Blue Streak (Cedar Point)

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Blue Streak
Blue streak1 CP.JPG
Initial drop on Blue Streak
Cedar Point
Coordinates 41°28′47.50″N 82°40′57.50″W / 41.4798611°N 82.6826389°W / 41.4798611; -82.6826389Coordinates: 41°28′47.50″N 82°40′57.50″W / 41.4798611°N 82.6826389°W / 41.4798611; -82.6826389
Status Operating
Opening date May 23, 1964 (1964-05-23)
Cost $200,000
General statistics
Type Wood
Manufacturer Philadelphia Toboggan Coasters
Designer Frank F. Hoover & John C. Allen
Track layout Out and Back roller coaster
Lift/launch system Chain
Height 78 ft (24 m)
Drop 72 ft (22 m)
Length 2,558 ft (780 m)
Speed 40 mph (64 km/h)
Inversions 0
Duration 1:45
Max vertical angle 45°
Capacity 1,400 riders per hour
Height restriction 48 in (122 cm)
Trains 2 trains with 4 cars. Riders are arranged 2 across in 3 rows for a total of 24 riders per train.
Fast Lane available
Blue Streak at RCDB
Pictures of Blue Streak at RCDB

Blue Streak is a wooden roller coaster located at Cedar Point in Sandusky, Ohio. Built by Philadelphia Toboggan Company, Blue Streak opened to the public on May 23, 1964, and is the park's oldest roller coaster. In 2013, it was ranked 27th among the world's top wooden roller coasters by Amusement Today.

History[edit]

Blue Streak logo on station
Blue Streak turnaround from the parking lot.

Cedar Point was without a roller coaster for more than a decade following its removal of Cyclone in 1951.[1] Blue Streak, which opened on May 23, 1964, was the first roller coaster to be added back to the park. The attraction's success led to a rebirth of roller coasters at Cedar Point, including Cedar Creek Mine Ride (1969), Corkscrew (1976), Gemini (1978) and Jr. Gemini (1979).[1]

Blue Streak features a traditional "out-and-back" layout designed and built by Philadelphia Toboggan Company. It was named after the athletic teams at the local Sandusky High School who were known as "The Blue Streaks".[2] Cedar Point invested $200,000 to construct the wooden roller coaster, and it remains a favorite at the park and within annual roller coaster polls.[3] In Amusement Today's 2013 Golden Ticket Awards, Blue Streak was ranked 27th among wooden roller coasters worldwide.[4]

Ride experience[edit]

After a 78-foot climb (24 m) up its lift hill, the train descends 72 feet (22 m) at a 45-degree angle reaching a top speed of 40 miles per hour (64 km/h). Riders then enter a series of two short hills which provide the ride's maximum airtime followed by a larger, third hill that slows the train slightly. After the next drop, the train climbs into a 180-degree turn that sends riders over a short hill followed by three medium-sized hills on its way back. The ride ends on the track's final brake run before returning to the station.[5]

ACE Coaster Classic award[edit]

Blue Streak was awarded the status of ACE Coaster Classic, which honors wooden roller coasters that maintain a traditional ride experience. The status was later rescinded, however, as a result of changes made later to the roller coaster – divided seats, individual lap bars, and seat belts.[6]

Rankings[edit]

Golden Ticket Awards: Top wood Roller Coasters
Year 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013
Ranking 48[7] 34 (tie)[8] 35 (tie)[9] 42[10] 38[11] 38[12] 48[13] 41[14] 47 (tie)[15] 47[16] 49[17] 38[18] 27[19]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Samuelson, Dale; Yegoiants, Wendy (2001). The American Amusement Park (in English). St. Paul, MN: MBI Publishing Company. p. 130. ISBN 978-0760309810. 
  2. ^ "Blue Streak — Point Place". Retrieved July 1, 2012. 
  3. ^ Cedar Point to hear band of 3,500 The Toledo Blade, May 19, 1964
  4. ^ Baldwin, Tim (2013). "Amusement Today — Golden Ticket Winners 2013" (PDF). Amusement Today. Retrieved April 29, 2014. ,
  5. ^ "Blue Streak On-Ride POV". Cedar Point. October 16, 2012. Retrieved August 19, 2013. 
  6. ^ "ACE Coaster Classic". American Coaster Enthusiasts. Retrieved August 26, 2012. 
  7. ^ "Top 25 wood roller coasters" (PDF). Amusement Today: 6B. August 2001. Retrieved September 8,. 
  8. ^ "Top 25 wood roller coasters" (PDF). Amusement Today: 6B. September 2002. Retrieved September 8,. 
  9. ^ "Top 50 wood roller coasters" (PDF). Amusement Today: 10–11B. September 2003. Retrieved September 8,. 
  10. ^ "Top 50 wood roller coasters" (PDF). Amusement Today: 14–15B. September 2004. Archived from the original on April 3, 2007. Retrieved September 8,. 
  11. ^ "Top 50 wood roller coasters" (PDF). Amusement Today: 22–23B. September 2005. Retrieved September 8,. 
  12. ^ "Top 50 wood roller coasters" (PDF). Amusement Today: 30–31B. September 2006. Retrieved September 8,. 
  13. ^ "Top 50 wood roller coasters" (PDF). Amusement Today 11 (6.2): 42–43. September 2007. Retrieved September 8,. 
  14. ^ "Top 50 wood roller coasters" (PDF). Amusement Today 12 (6.2): 42–43. September 2008. Retrieved September 8,. 
  15. ^ "Top 50 wood roller coasters" (PDF). Amusement Today 13 (6.2): 38–39. September 2009. Retrieved September 8,. 
  16. ^ "Top 50 wood roller coasters" (PDF). Amusement Today 14 (6.2): 38–39. September 2010. Retrieved September 8,. 
  17. ^ "Top 50 wood roller coasters" (PDF). Amusement Today 15 (6.2): 46–47. September 2011. Retrieved September 8,. 
  18. ^ "Top 50 wood roller coasters" (PDF). Amusement Today 16 (6.2): 46–47. September 2012. Retrieved September 8,. 
  19. ^ "2013 Top 50 wood Roller Coasters" (PDF). Amusement Today 17 (6.2): 40–41. September 2013. Archived from the original on October 19, 2013. Retrieved September 8,. 

External links[edit]