Wicked Twister

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Wicked Twister
Wicked twister1 CP.JPG
Cedar Point
Coordinates 41°28′55.25″N 82°40′47.50″W / 41.4820139°N 82.6798611°W / 41.4820139; -82.6798611Coordinates: 41°28′55.25″N 82°40′47.50″W / 41.4820139°N 82.6798611°W / 41.4820139; -82.6798611
Status Operating
Soft opening date May 2, 2002
Opening date May 5, 2002
Cost $9,000,000 USD
Replaced Aquarium
General statistics
Type Steel – Inverted – Launched
Manufacturer Intamin
Designer Werner Stengel
Model Twisted Impulse Coaster
Lift/launch system LIM Launch track
Height 215 ft (66 m)
Drop 206 ft (63 m)
Length 675 ft (206 m)
Speed 72 mph (116 km/h)
Inversions 0
Duration 0:40
Max vertical angle 90°
Capacity 1,000 riders per hour
Acceleration 0.4
G-force 2.1
Height restriction 52–78 in (132–198 cm)
Trains Single train with 8 cars. Riders are arranged 2 across in 2 rows for a total of 32 riders per train.
Wicked Twister at RCDB
Pictures of Wicked Twister at RCDB

Wicked Twister is a second generation steel Inverted Impulse roller coaster at Cedar Point in Sandusky, Ohio. As of 2014, it is the tallest and fastest inverted roller coaster in the world.

History[edit]

Construction on Wicked Twister started on October 15, 2001 when the Stadium Games, formerly the Aquarium, were razed.[1] Wicked Twister was officially announced about a month later on November 20.[2] The first pieces of steel were erected on December 15 and the first piece of track was installed four days later. The first test run occurred on April 2, 2002.[3]

Wicked Twister's media day was held on May 2, 2002[1] then it opened to the public on May 5.[4] Additional supports were added to the ride's structure for the 2003 season. Two yellow supports were added to each spike to connect the track to the top of the main support structure.[5]

Ride experience[edit]

Layout[edit]

Train being launched

At the beginning of the ride, the linear induction motors propel the train forward out of the station during its first launch at 50 mph (80 km/h), which carries the train approximately halfway up the front tower. After coming to a stop, the train falls and enters the LIM section again, where the train is accelerated during its second launch to 63 mph (101 km/h) in the backward direction so that the train climbs half way up the rear tower. The train then stops and drops forward before re-entering the LIM section where additional thrust is added as the train gains to 69 mph (111 km/h) during its third launch, causing the train to reach its highest point on the front tower. Stopping and reversing, the train drops and re-enters the LIM section where the LIM launches the train for the fourth time, making the train reach a maximum speed of 72 mph (116 km/h) to travel a maximum of 206 ft (63 m) up the rear tower. With the one more final pass forward through the LIM section, the train goes up the front spike once more before the train reverses. As it travels back toward the station, the brakes are applied and it stops within the station platform.[4][6][7] Unlike other Inverted roller coasters, there is no floor in the loading station that drops out underneath the train. Riders must climb into their seats when loading.

Wicked Twister cars toward top of one of the spiral towers

Details[edit]

Wicked Twister consists of two 215 feet (66 m) tall spikes. Both ends of the towers (track) are designed with 450-degree vertical twists which is the main difference between Wicked Twister and other Inverted Impulse roller coasters. Between the towers, a horizontal track section incorporates the load and unload area as well as the linear induction motor propulsion system. The ride was built directly on the Cedar Point Beach with its entrance plaza being in the former Aquaraium location. The track is painted yellow with teal supports.[4]

The ride features one train that consists of eight cars. Riders are arranged two across in two rows for a total of 32 riders.[4] Wicked Twister's theme song is "The Winner" by the Crystal Method.

Safety systems[edit]

Wicked Twister has many additional safety systems installed because it passes the station multiple times, and at high speeds. The first of these systems is a "light curtain", named for the nature in which it operates. Two emitters and two receivers are placed on each side of the ride station. Each emitter sends a thick, invisible beam of light towards the receiver on the other side. If at any time this beam is broken during ride operation, it will automatically emergency stop. Another safety system is installed under the station, attached to the automatic platform gates. If an individual places too much downward vertical force, or shakes the gates, the ride emergency stops. Yet another safety system is located on all other gates on the ride, including entrance and exit. The gates are electromagnetically sealed while the ride is in progress, to ensure guests do not enter. After the 2009 season yet another safety system was installed on the train that wirelessly communicates with the light curtain mentioned above that can stop the train anywhere on the launch/brake section of the track when the light is broken.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "PointBuzz history". PointBuzz. Retrieved October 22, 2012. 
  2. ^ "Wicked Twister Press Release". November 20, 2002. Retrieved October 22, 2012. 
  3. ^ Hyde, Andrew. "Wicked Twister construction timeline". Experience the Point. Retrieved October 22, 2012. 
  4. ^ a b c d Marden, Duane. "Wicked Twister  (Cedar Point)". Roller Coaster DataBase. Retrieved October 22, 2012. 
  5. ^ "New support pictures". Magnumforcexl200. April 26, 2003. Retrieved October 22, 2012. 
  6. ^ "Wicked Twister". AmericaCoasters.com. Retrieved June 24, 2012. 
  7. ^ "Wicked Twister POV". Sharp Productions. August 3, 2010. Retrieved October 25, 2012. 

External links[edit]

Preceded by
Alpengeist
World's tallest inverted roller coaster
May 2002–present
Succeeded by
Current record holder
Preceded by
Volcano, The Blast Coaster
World's fastest inverted roller coaster
May 2002–present
Succeeded by
Current record holder