Bombora

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
For other uses, see Bombora (disambiguation).

Bombora is an indigenous Australian term for an area of large sea waves breaking over a shallow area such as a submerged rock shelf, reef, or sand bank that is located some distance from the shoreline and beach surf break. In slang it is also called a bommie.[1]

As the wave passes over the shallow area its shape is raised and steepened, creating a localised wave formation.[2] The size and shape of bombora waves makes them attractive to surfers willing to take the risk of riding what is generally considered a hazardous pursuit.

These formations can pose a significant danger even in good weather as a bombora may not be identifiable because it may not always have breaking waves.[3]

The term Bombora was given wide circulation by the airing on ABC TV in 2009 of a documentary titled Bombora - The Story of Australian Surfing, which received a nomination for the 2010 Logie Awards in Australia.[4][5] The documentary explored historical dimensions of the relationship between surf culture and Australian cultural identity.[6][7]

Bombora was also the title of a popular music instrumental released in 1963 by Australian surf rock band The Atlantics.

Well known instances[edit]

  • Dobroyd Bombora - in Sydney Harbour
  • Jibbon Bombora - at Bundeena in the south of Sydney[8]
  • Outer Bombora - at Yallingup
  • "The Bommie" - on the northern side of The Penguin's Head, Culburra Beach, NSW.

A bombora is also a term used for a sketchy surf spot where waves seem to break on the outside. For an example, see "Cow Bommie," a tow-in surf spot near Margaret River, in Western Australia. [1]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Collins Dictionary. Example, "Manly itself has [...] the offshore Queenscliff “Bommie” (bombora), joy for big wave riders.", Australia's 8 greatest surf spots, Australian Geographic.
  2. ^ Bird, Eric (2008). Coastal geomorphology: an introduction. John Wiley and Sons. p. 17. ISBN 0-470-51730-1. 
  3. ^ "Boating Handbook: Safe Operation" (pdf). NSW Maritime. Retrieved 2009-06-18. [dead link]
  4. ^ "Bombora". Screen Australia. Retrieved 6 February 2014. 
  5. ^ "Bombora - The History of Australian Surfing". ABC Commercial. Retrieved 6 February 2014. 
  6. ^ http://www.screenaustralia.gov.au/showcases/bombora/Bombora%20TNotes.pdf
  7. ^ http://www.screenaustralia.gov.au/showcases/bombora/Bombora_Press_Kit.pdf
  8. ^ Arjun Ramachandran (2008-08-25). "One dead as boat hit by wave". Sydney Morning Herald. Retrieved 2009-06-18.