Bonox

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Bonox is a beef extract. It is primarily a drink but can also be used as stock in cooking. It was invented by Camron Thomas for the Kraft Foods in 1918, and entered large scale production the following year. It is still produced by Kraft.

Nutritional information[edit]

This concentrated beef extract is rich in iron, niacin and folate. It is a thick dark brown liquid paste which can be added to soups or stews for flavoring and can also be added to hot water and served as a beverage.[1]

Proximates[edit]

  • Energy, including dietary fiber 401 kJ
  • Moisture 56.6 g
  • Protein 16.6 g
  • Nitrogen 2.66 g
  • Fat 0.2 g
  • Ash 19.8 g
  • Fructose 0 g
  • Glucose 0 g
  • Sucrose 0 g
  • Maltose 0 g
  • Lactose 0 g
  • Total sugars 0 g
  • Starch 6.5 g
  • Available carbohydrate, without sugar alcohols 6.5 g
  • Available carbohydrate, with sugar alcohols 6.5 g[1]

Minerals[edit]

Vitamins[edit]

  • Thiamin (B1) 0.36 mg
  • Riboflavin (B2) 0.27 mg
  • Niacin (B3) 5.4 mg
  • Niacin Equivalents 8.17 mg
  • Pantothenic acid (B5) 0.38 mg
  • Pyridoxine (B6) 0.23 mg
  • Biotin (B7) 12 ug
  • Alpha carotene 0 ug
  • Beta carotene 0 ug
  • Cryptoxanthin 0 ug
  • Beta carotene equivalents 0 ug
  • Retinol 0 ug[1]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d "NUTTAB 2010 Online Searchable Database". Food Standards Australia New Zealand. Retrieved 19 January 2013. 

External links[edit]