Boundary Dam Power Station

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Boundary Dam Power Station
SaskPower Boundary Dam GS.jpg
Boundary Dam Power Station is located in Saskatchewan
Boundary Dam Power Station
Location of Boundary Dam Power Station
Country Canada
Location Estevan No. 5, near Estevan, Saskatchewan
Coordinates 49°5′47″N 103°1′49″W / 49.09639°N 103.03028°W / 49.09639; -103.03028Coordinates: 49°5′47″N 103°1′49″W / 49.09639°N 103.03028°W / 49.09639; -103.03028
Status Active
Commission date 1959
Owner(s) SaskPower
Power generation
Primary fuel Coal (lignite)
Nameplate capacity 813 megawatts

Boundary Dam Power Station is the largest coal fired station owned by SaskPower, located near Estevan, Saskatchewan, Canada.

Description[edit]

The Boundary Dam Power Station consists of:[1]

  • two 62 net MW units (commissioned in 1959)
  • two 139 net MW units (commissioned in 1970)
  • one 139 net MW unit (commissioned in 1973)
  • one 273 net MW unit (commissioned in 1978)

The boilers are supplied by Babcock and Wilcox and Combustion Engineering while the turbines/generator are supplied by General Electric and Hitatchi.[2] There is also Boundary Dam (Saskatchewan) (constructed in 1957) located next to the station. It is an earth fill dam, which created the Boundary Reservoir on Long Creek (Saskatchewan) a few kilometres west of the river's mouth on the Souris River. The station uses water from the reservoir for coolant, which is why Boundary Reservoir is the only body of water in Saskatchewan that doesn't freeze over during the winter months and why it's also the only body of water in Saskatchewan that supports largemouth bass. The lake's fish species include walleye, yellow perch, northern pike, burbot, largemouth bass, smallmouth bass and white sucker.

Carbon Capture and Storage Demonstration Project[edit]

The Boundary Dam Integrated Carbon Capture and Storage Demonstration Project is a $1.4 billion project to retrofit the coal-fired unit 3 with carbon capture and an enhanced oil recovery system.[3] The project when complete is expected to result in 1 million tonnes/year reduction in CO2 emissions. It will also reduce the output of Unit 3 from 139 MW to 110 MW.[4] The project anticipates completion in 2015.[5] The Canadian federal government paid $240 million towards the project.[6]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

External links[edit]