Brian Scalabrine

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Brian Scalabrine
Scal Media Day.png
Scalabrine with the Celtics
Personal information
Born (1978-03-18) March 18, 1978 (age 36)
Long Beach, California
Nationality American
Listed height 6 ft 9 in (2.06 m)
Listed weight 235 lb (107 kg)
Career information
High school Enumclaw (Enumclaw, Washington)
College Highline College (1996–1998)
USC (1998–2001)
NBA draft 2001 / Round: 2 / Pick: 34th overall
Selected by the New Jersey Nets
Pro career 2001–2012
Position Forward
Number 21, 44, 24
Career history
As player:
20012005 New Jersey Nets
20052010 Boston Celtics
20102012 Chicago Bulls
2011 Benetton Treviso
As coach:
20132014 Golden State Warriors (assistant)
Career highlights and awards
Stats at Basketball-Reference.com

Brian David Scalabrine (born March 18, 1978) is a former American basketball player who is currently a television analyst for the Boston Celtics of the National Basketball Association (NBA). Raised in Enumclaw, Washington, Scalabrine attended the University of Southern California after transferring from Highline College. As a member of the USC Trojans men's basketball team, Scalabrine was the top average scorer and a leader in field goals and rebounds. He also played at the center position in college.

The New Jersey Nets selected him in the second round of the 2001 NBA Draft. The Nets made the 2002 NBA Finals during his rookie season, and Scalabrine played four seasons with the team. In 2005, he signed with the Boston Celtics and won a championship with the team in 2008. The Celtics also appeared in the 2010 NBA Finals. Scalabrine signed with the Chicago Bulls the following season, and played with them until 2012. Throughout his NBA career, Scalabrine served as a backup power forward.

In 2012, Scalabrine turned down a chance to become an assistant coach with the Bulls to pursue opportunities in broadcasting. In 2013, Mark Jackson announced that Scalabrine would join his Golden State Warriors coaching staff. In 2014, Scalabrine took a job as an analyst for Celtics games on local Boston broadcasts.[1]

Early life and college

Born in Long Beach, California, Scalabrine was one of four children in his family and graduated from Enumclaw High School at Enumclaw, Washington in 1996.[2][3] He is of Italian ancestry.[4] He enrolled at Highline College in 1996, played his first year with its basketball team the Thunderbirds, and redshirted his second year. As a freshman at Highline, Scalabrine averaged 16.3 points, 9.6 rebounds, 2.9 assists and 1.2 steals per game. Scalabrine recorded seventeen double-doubles, and led the team in rebounds, blocks, and free throw percentage (75%). The Thunderbirds went 31-1 in the 1996–97 season and won the state junior college championship. Scalabrine was a Northern Division All-Star in 1997 as well as part of the All-Northwest Athletic Association of Community Colleges Championship Tournament Team.[3]

In 1998, he transferred to the University of Southern California (USC). In his first year with the USC Trojans men's basketball team, he was the only player to start all 28 games. He led the Trojans in scoring (14.6 points), rebounding (6.4), and field goals (53.1%). In scoring, blocked shots, and field goals, he was also the only Pac-10 conference player among the top 10 players in those areas. His best game performance was against American University on December 21, 1998: 26 points, seven rebounds, and two blocks.[5] On February 13, 1999, he scored 22 points including an important three-pointer in overtime; the unranked USC won an upset victory over number-six Stanford 86-82 in overtime.[6] He was the 1999 Pac-10 Newcomer of the Year and earned an All-Pac-10 honorable mention.[3]

During his second season with USC, Scalabrine was named to the All-Pac-10 first team and the National Association of Basketball Coaches All-District 15 first team. He also earned a Sporting News All-American honorable mention. Again, he finished as USC's top scorer (17.8 ppg) and field goal shooter (53.1%) and was also the second-best Pac-10 scorer. He also made 40.3% of attempted three-pointers. Against the Oregon Ducks, Scalabrine scored 29 points and made 10 rebounds.[3]

USC advanced to the NCAA tournament in 2001, Scalabrine's senior season. In the Elite Eight round, USC lost to Duke 79-69; Scalabrine scored 13 points.[7] Scalabrine graduated with a degree in history.[2][3]

Career

New Jersey Nets

Because he injured his fifth metatarsal bone during workouts in late September 2001, Scalabrine missed the first ten days of New Jersey Nets training camp.[8] During the second quarter of the final 2001–02 preseason game, which took place against the Detroit Pistons on October 26, 2001, Scalabrine again injured his right foot.[9] He made his NBA debut on January 31, 2002, when the Nets played against the Milwaukee Bucks.[2] As a rookie, Scalabrine averaged 2.1 points, 1.8 rebounds, and 0.8 assists per game.[10] He played in six playoff games his debut season and averaged 0.3 points and 0.5 rebounds.[2] The Nets were the Eastern Conference Champions of the 2001–02 season and lost the 2002 NBA Finals to the Los Angeles Lakers in four games. In a triple-overtime victory over the Detroit Pistons in Game 5 of the 2004 Eastern Conference Semifinal series, Scalabrine scored a career high 17 points.[11] He surpassed that high with 29 points on January 26, 2005 against the Golden State Warriors.[2] On April 15, 2005, he played a career high 45 minutes.[12]

During his time with the Nets, Scalabrine gained the nickname "Veal", a play on words based on the dish veal scaloppini.[13]

Boston Celtics

On August 2, 2005, Scalabrine signed a five-year contract with the Boston Celtics.[14] A month earlier, he and the team agreed on terms that the contract be worth $15 million over the five years.[15]

In 48 games during the 2007–08 season, Scalabrine started in nine and played on average 10.7 minutes. He averaged 1.8 points and 1.6 rebounds per game. On April 16, 2008, in the final game of the regular season, Scalabrine tied a season-high with six rebounds and played 29 minutes. He did not make an appearance in the NBA playoffs.[2] In the 2008 Finals, the Celtics defeated the Lakers in six games.

Chicago Bulls

Scalabrine warms up before Game 5 of the 2011 Eastern Conference Finals.

On September 21, 2010, Scalabrine agreed to a non-guaranteed contract with the Chicago Bulls.[16] The Bulls visited the Boston Celtics on November 5, 2010, and in double overtime the Bulls won 110-105. Scalabrine played only three minutes that game.[17] He played 18 games with the Bulls and averaged 1.1 points and 0.4 rebounds per game.[12]

Italy

On September 22, 2011, during the 2011 NBA lockout, Scalabrine signed with the Italian team Benetton Treviso.[18] He left the team in December 2011 to pursue opportunities in the NBA after the lockout had ended.[19]

Return to Chicago

On December 12, 2011, Scalabrine re-signed with the Bulls.[20]

Later work

In September 2012, Scalabrine announced that he had turned down an opportunity to become an assistant coach with the Bulls so that he could join Comcast SportsNet New England as a commentator. Scalabrine described the job as "a trial run", and said there was a "small possibility" he would resume his playing career overseas in 2013.[21]

In July 2013, Golden State Warriors coach Mark Jackson announced via Twitter that Scalabrine was joining his coaching staff.[22] In 2014, Scalabrine wrote an essay to Boston to state his 'homecoming' to become Comcast SportsNet announcer.[23]

In August, 2014, Scalabrine took a job as an analyst for Celtics games on local Boston broadcasts. He announced his intention to return to Boston by spoofing a famous Sports Illustrated cover story about LeBron James's return to Cleveland.[1]

Personal life

Scalabrine married Kristen Couch in 2003; their wedding ceremony was held in Hawaii.[2] They have two children.[24] He is also a member of the sports philanthropy organization Athletes for Hope.[25]

Fan support

Despite his limited playing time, Scalabrine became a popular player. Bulls fans referred to him as "The White Mamba," a play on Kobe Bryant's nickname of "The Black Mamba."[26][27][28]

NBA career statistics

Legend
  GP Games played   GS  Games started  MPG  Minutes per game
 FG%  Field goal percentage  3P%  3-point field goal percentage  FT%  Free throw percentage
 RPG  Rebounds per game  APG  Assists per game  SPG  Steals per game
 BPG  Blocks per game  PPG  Points per game  Bold  Career high

Regular season

Year Team GP GS MPG FG% 3P% FT% RPG APG SPG BPG PPG
2001–02 New Jersey 28 0 10.4 .343 .300 .733 1.8 .8 .3 .1 2.1
2002–03 New Jersey 59 7 12.3 .402 .359 .833 2.4 .8 .3 .3 3.1
2003–04 New Jersey 69 2 13.4 .394 .244 .829 2.5 .9 .3 .2 3.5
2004–05 New Jersey 54 14 21.6 .398 .324 .768 4.5 1.6 .6 .3 6.3
2005–06 Boston 71 1 13.2 .383 .356 .722 1.6 .7 .3 .3 2.9
2006–07 Boston 54 17 19.0 .403 .400 .783 1.9 1.1 .4 .3 4.0
2007–08 Boston 48 9 10.7 .389 .326 .750 1.6 .8 .2 .2 1.8
2008–09 Boston 39 8 12.9 .421 .393 .889 1.3 .5 .2 .3 3.5
2009–10 Boston 52 3 9.1 .341 .327 .667 .9 .5 .2 .1 1.5
2010–11 Chicago 18 0 4.9 .526 .000 .000 .4 .3 .2 .2 1.1
2011–12 Chicago 28 0 4.4 .467 .143 .500 .8 .5 .2 .2 1.1
Career 520 61 13.0 .390 .344 .783 2.0 .8 .3 .2 3.1

Playoffs

Year Team GP GS MPG FG% 3P% FT% RPG APG SPG BPG PPG
2002 New Jersey 6 0 2.3 .333 .000 .000 .5 .0 .0 .2 .3
2003 New Jersey 7 0 2.9 .500 .000 .000 .6 .0 .0 .0 .6
2004 New Jersey 9 0 8.1 .647 .833 .500 1.3 .1 .3 .0 3.3
2005 New Jersey 4 3 15.3 .182 .250 1.000 1.8 .5 .3 .5 2.3
2009 Boston 12 0 20.5 .423 .448 1.000 2.2 1.0 .2 .4 5.1
2010 Boston 1 0 1.0 .000 .000 .000 .0 .0 .0 .0 .0
Career 39 3 10.6 .437 .463 .786 1.3 .4 .2 .2 2.7

See also

References

  1. ^ a b Moore, Matt. "Brian Scalabrine is 'coming home'". CBS Sports.com. CBS Interactive. Retrieved 6 August 2014. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f g "Brian Scalabrine bio". NBA. Archived from the original on December 2, 2010. 
  3. ^ a b c d e "Brian Scalabrine". USC Trojans. 2001. Retrieved July 31, 2011. 
  4. ^ Kirkpatrick, Curry (March 23, 2001), "Treat me like a fool ...", ESPN the Magazine 
  5. ^ "1998-99 Southern California Trojans Schedule and Results". sports-reference.com. Retrieved July 31, 2011. 
  6. ^ "Stanford and U.C.L.A. Are Beaten". The New York Times. February 14, 1999. Retrieved August 1, 2011. 
  7. ^ "Duke 79, USC 69". CNNSI.com. March 24, 2001. Retrieved July 31, 2011. 
  8. ^ Robbins, Liz (October 3, 2001). "Kidd Is Named Captain Before Nets Open Camp". The New York Times. Retrieved August 1, 2011. 
  9. ^ Robbins, Liz (October 27, 2001). "A Healthy Nets Team Is Too Much to Wish For". The New York Times. Retrieved August 1, 2011. 
  10. ^ "Brian Scalabrine Stats". 
  11. ^ "Nets need three overtimes to beat Pistons". The Boston Globe. Associated Press. May 15, 2004. Retrieved July 31, 2011. 
  12. ^ a b "Brian Scalabrine Career State and Totals". NBA. Retrieved July 31, 2011. 
  13. ^ Stein, Marc (February 6, 2004). "Favorites of the fans". espn.com. Retrieved January 13, 2012. 
  14. ^ "Scalabrine signs with Celtics". USA Today. Associated Press. August 2, 2005. Retrieved July 31, 2011. 
  15. ^ Springer, Shira (July 8, 2005). "Celtics agree with free agent Scalabrine". The Boston Globe. Archived from the original on June 11, 2009. 
  16. ^ Wojnarowski, Adrian (September 21, 2010). "Bulls invite Scalabrine to training camp". Yahoo! Sports. Retrieved July 31, 2011. 
  17. ^ Forsberg, Chris (November 6, 2010). "Celtics sing praises of Brian Scalabrine". ESPN. Retrieved July 31, 2011. 
  18. ^ (Italian) MOTIEJUNAS IN PRESTITO AL PROKOM, SCALABRINE E' NEL ROSTER ATTIVO COME 'USA'
  19. ^ La Benetton Treviso saluta Scalabrine.
  20. ^ http://www.nba.com/bulls/news/bulls-re-sign-forward-brian-scalabrine.html
  21. ^ Brian Scalabrine says he's likely retiring
  22. ^ Mark Jackson tweet, July 8, 2013
  23. ^ Newport, Kyle (Aug 4, 2014). "Brian Scalabrine Announces His Return to Boston Celtics in 'Coming Home' Essay". Bleacher Report. Retrieved Aug 5, 2014. 
  24. ^ Johnson, K.C. (May 1, 2011). "Scalabrine's wife nixes Thibodeau impersonation". Chicago Tribune. Retrieved July 31, 2011. 
  25. ^ "Brian Scalabrine". Athletes for Hope. Retrieved July 31, 2011. 
  26. ^ "Return of the 'White Mamba': Bulls re-sign Scalabrine". CSN Chicago. 2011. Retrieved January 14, 2012. 
  27. ^ Friedell, Nick (January 19, 2012). "White Mamba: Fan fave on, off the court". ESPN. Retrieved January 24, 2011. 
  28. ^ http://bleacherreport.com/articles/1047970-the-white-mamba-what-makes-people-love-brian-scalabrine

External links