Earl Watson

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Earl Watson
Earl Watson Bulls vs Pacers December 2009.jpg
Austin Toros
Assistant coach
Personal information
Born (1979-06-12) June 12, 1979 (age 35)
Kansas City, Kansas
Nationality American
Listed height 6 ft 1 in (1.85 m)
Listed weight 199 lb (90 kg)
Career information
High school Washington (Kansas City, Kansas)
College UCLA (19972001)
NBA draft 2001 / Round: 2 / Pick: 39th overall
Selected by the Seattle SuperSonics
Pro career 2001–2014
Position Point guard
Coaching career 2014–present
Career history
As player:
2001–2002 Seattle SuperSonics
20022005 Memphis Grizzlies
2005–2006 Denver Nuggets
20062009 Seattle SuperSonics / Oklahoma City Thunder
2009–2010 Indiana Pacers
20102013 Utah Jazz
2013–2014 Portland Trail Blazers
As coach:
2014–present Austin Toros (assistant)
Career highlights and awards
Stats at Basketball-Reference.com

Earl Joseph Watson, Jr. (born June 12, 1979)[1] is an American former professional basketball player in the National Basketball Association (NBA) who is currently an assistant coach with the Austin Toros of the NBA Development League (D-League). He played college basketball for the UCLA Bruins, where he was a four-year starter. Watson was drafted by the Seattle SuperSonics in the second round of the 2001 NBA Draft with the 39th overall selection. He played 13 years in the NBA with seven teams before becoming a coach in 2014.

High school and college career[edit]

Watson is a graduate of Washington High School in Kansas City, Kansas. In his senior year of high school he averaged 23.4 points, 8.3 assists and 14 rebounds per game.[2]

Watson was a starter in college at UCLA, at one point playing alongside future NBA All-Star Baron Davis. They were the first two freshmen to start at UCLA since the 1979 season. A four-year starter, Watson started the most consecutive games in the history of UCLA basketball.[2] He was named All-Pac-10 First Team his senior year in 2001.

Professional career[edit]

Watson was selected in the second round (39th overall) by the SuperSonics in the 2001 NBA draft. In the 2007–08 NBA season, Watson averaged 10.7 points and 6.8 assists with the Sonics. On February 6, 2008, Watson recorded his first-ever triple-double in a game against the Sacramento Kings. Watson logged 23 points, 10 rebounds and 10 assists in 32 minutes.[3] It was Seattle's first triple-double since Ray Allen registered one on January 28, 2004, against the Los Angeles Lakers.[3]

On July 17, 2009, Watson was waived by the Thunder.[4] He signed a one-year deal with the Indiana Pacers on July 28, 2009.[5]

He signed with the Utah Jazz on September 26, 2010.[6]

On July 10, 2013, he signed with the Portland Trail Blazers.[7]

Coaching career[edit]

On October 2, 2014, Watson was hired as an assistant coach by the Austin Toros of the NBA D-League, effectively ending his 13-year playing career.[8]

NBA career statistics[edit]

Legend
  GP Games played   GS  Games started  MPG  Minutes per game
 FG%  Field goal percentage  3P%  3-point field goal percentage  FT%  Free throw percentage
 RPG  Rebounds per game  APG  Assists per game  SPG  Steals per game
 BPG  Blocks per game  PPG  Points per game  Bold  Career high

Regular season[edit]

Year Team GP GS MPG FG% 3P% FT% RPG APG SPG BPG PPG
2001–02 Seattle 64 0 15.1 .453 .364 .639 1.3 2.0 .9 .1 3.6
2002–03 Memphis 79 2 17.3 .435 .341 .721 2.1 2.8 1.1 .2 5.5
2003–04 Memphis 81 14 20.6 .371 .245 .652 2.2 5.0 1.1 .2 5.7
2004–05 Memphis 80 14 22.6 .426 .319 .659 2.1 4.5 1.0 .2 7.7
2005–06 Denver 46 10 21.2 .429 .395 .627 1.9 3.5 .8 .2 7.5
2005–06 Seattle 24 0 25.1 .432 .420 .731 3.0 5.4 1.3 .1 11.5
2006–07 Seattle 77 25 27.9 .383 .329 .735 2.4 5.7 1.3 .3 9.4
2007–08 Seattle 78 73 29.1 .454 .371 .766 2.9 6.8 .9 .1 10.7
2008–09 Oklahoma City 68 18 26.1 .384 .235 .755 2.7 5.8 .7 .2 6.6
2009–10 Indiana 79 52 29.4 .426 .288 .710 3.0 5.1 1.3 .2 7.8
2010–11 Utah 80 13 19.6 .410 .336 .671 2.3 3.5 .8 .2 4.3
2011–12 Utah 50 2 20.7 .338 .192 .674 2.4 4.3 1.1 .4 3.0
2012–13 Utah 48 4 17.3 .308 .179 .680 1.8 4.0 .8 .2 2.0
2013–14 Portland 24 0 6.7 .273 .286 1.000 .6 1.2 .2 .0 0.5
Career 878 227 22.2 .411 .324 .703 2.3 4.4 1.0 .2 6.4

Playoffs[edit]

Year Team GP GS MPG FG% 3P% FT% RPG APG SPG BPG PPG
2004 Memphis 4 0 15.5 .533 .000 1.000 2.3 1.8 1.3 .0 4.8
2005 Memphis 4 0 18.5 .333 .111 1.000 2.5 3.8 .8 .3 4.8
2014 Portland 4 0 3.5 .000 .000 .000 .3 .3 .0 .0 0.0
Career 12 0 12.5 .400 .077 1.000 1.7 1.9 .7 .1 3.2

Personal[edit]

Watson's father, Earl, is African American and his mother, Estella, is Mexican American. Because his maternal grandparents were born in Mexico, Watson is eligible to play for the Mexico national basketball team.[9][10] Watson has four brothers and one sister.[1] Watson founded the organization "Emagine" to impact the youth of his hometown Kansas City, Kansas.[11]

Watson has a daughter, Isabella.[12] He was formerly married to actress Jennifer Freeman.[13]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Earl Watson Stats, Video, Bio, Profile". NBA.com. Retrieved September 20, 2013. 
  2. ^ a b Player Bio: Earl Watson
  3. ^ a b "Watson gets first career triple-double to help Sonics finish off Kings". ESPN.com. February 6, 2008. Retrieved September 20, 2013. 
  4. ^ "Oklahoma City Thunder waive Earl Watson". InsideHoops.com. July 17, 2009. Retrieved September 20, 2013. 
  5. ^ "Indiana Pacers sign Earl Watson". InsideHoops.com. July 28, 2009. Retrieved September 20, 2013. 
  6. ^ "Utah Jazz Signs Guard Earl Watson". NBA.com. September 26, 2010. Retrieved September 20, 2013. 
  7. ^ TRAIL BLAZERS SIGN EARL WATSON
  8. ^ "Austin Toros Announce Coaching Staff Additions". NBA.com. October 2, 2014. Archived from the original on October 14, 2014. 
  9. ^ Chris Perkins. "NBA Extra". Palm Beach Post. January 15, 2006. 7B.
  10. ^ Garcia, Marlen (June 14, 2007). "Richardson exporting his deep basketball knowledge". USAToday.com. Retrieved May 1, 2010. 
  11. ^ Spotlight. Vol. 13, No. 3, April 2007[dead link]
  12. ^ "2012-13 Utah Jazz media guide". p. 71. Retrieved May 20, 2013. 
  13. ^ "About". jenniferfreeman.com. Retrieved May 20, 2013. 

External links[edit]