CFBDSIR 1458+10

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Coordinates: Sky map 14h 58m 29.0s, +10° 13′ 43″

CFBDSIR J145829+101343
Brown Dwarf Binary CFBDSIR 1458+10.tif
CFBDSIR 1458+10
Observation data
Epoch J2000      Equinox J2000
Constellation Boötes
Right ascension 14h 58m 29.0s
Declination 10° 13′ 43″
Characteristics
Whole system (MKO filter system)
Apparent magnitude (Y) 20.58 ± 0.21[1]
Apparent magnitude (J) 19.67 ± 0.02[2][1]
Apparent magnitude (H) 20.06 ± 0.10[2][1]
Apparent magnitude (K) 20.50 ± 0.24[1]
Component A (MKO filter system)
Spectral type T9[1]
Apparent magnitude (Y) 20.81 ± 0.21[1]
Apparent magnitude (J) 19.83 ± 0.02[1]
Apparent magnitude (H) 20.18 ± 0.10[1]
Apparent magnitude (K) 20.63 ± 0.24[1]
Component B (MKO filter system)
Spectral type Y0[1]
Apparent magnitude (Y) 22.36 ± 0.24[1]
Apparent magnitude (J) 21.85 ± 0.06[1]
Apparent magnitude (H) 22.51 ± 0.16[1]
Apparent magnitude (K) 22.83 ± 0.30[1]
Astrometry
Proper motion (μ) RA: 174.0 ± 2.0[3] mas/yr
Dec.: −381.8 ± 2.7[3] mas/yr
Parallax (π) 31.3 ± 2.5[3] mas
Distance 104 ± 8 ly
(32 ± 3 pc)
Orbit[4]
Primary A
Companion B
Period (P) 20+17
−6
—35+28
−10
yr
Details
Component A
Mass (11.1 ± 0.7)—(36 ± 4)[4] MJup
Luminosity (bolometric) 10−5.72 ± 0.13[1] L
Surface gravity (log g) (4.37 ± 0.03)—(5.06 ± 0.07)[4] cgs
Temperature (479 ± 20)—(605 ± 55)[4] K
Component B
Mass 6—15[4] MJup
Luminosity (bolometric) 10−6.53 ± 0.13[1] L
Surface gravity (log g) (4.10 ± 0.10)—(4.69 ± 0.03)[4] cgs
Temperature 370 ± 40[4] K
Position (relative to A)
Component B
Epoch of observation UT 2012 April 13
Angular distance 127.2 ± 1.4 mas [1]
Position angle 318.1 ± 1.1° [1]
Observed separation
(projected)
4.06 AU [1][3]
Other designations
CFBDSIR J1458+1013
CFBDS 1458
CFBDS J145829+101343
WISEPA J145829.35+101341.8[2]
WISE J145829.40+101341.7[5]
Database references
SIMBAD data
Extrasolar Planets
Encyclopaedia
data

CFBDSIR J145829+101343 (designation abbreviated to CFBDSIR 1458+10, or CFBDSIR J1458+1013) is a binary system of two orbiting each other brown dwarfs of spectral classes T9 + Y0,[1] located in constellation Boötes about 104 light-years away from Earth.[3]

The smaller companion, CFBDSIR 1458+10B, has a surface temperature of approx 370 K (≈100 °C),[6][7] and used to be known as the coolest known brown dwarf until the discovery of WISE 1828+2650 in August 2011.[8]

Discovery[edit]

CFBDSIR 1458+10 A was discovered in 2010 by Delorme et al. from the Canada-France Brown Dwarf Survey using the facilities MegaCam and WIRCam mounted on the 3.6 m Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope, located on Mauna Kea Observatory, Hawai'i. Image in z` band was taken on 2004 July 15 with MegaCam, and image in J band was taken on 2007 April 1 with WIRCam. In 2009 they made follow-up photometry, using the SOFI near infrared camera at the ESO 3.5 m New Technology Telescope (NTT) at the La Silla Observatory, Chile. In 2010 Delorme et al. published a paper in Astronomy and Astrophysics where they reported the identifiсation of 55 T-dwarfs candidates, six of which were photometrically confirmed as T-dwarfs, including 3 ultracool brown dwarfs (later than T7 dwarfs and possible Y dwarfs), including CFBDSIR 1458+10.[9][note 1]

Discovery of B[edit]

CFBDSIR 1458+10 B was discovered in 2011 by Liu et al. with laser guide star (LGS) adaptive optics (AO) system of the 10 m Keck II Telescope on Mauna Kea, Hawai'i, using infra-red camera NIRC2 (the observations were made on 2010 May 22 and 2010 July 8 (UT)). In 2011 Liu et al. published a paper in The Astrophysical Journal where they presented discovery of CFBDSIR 1458+10 system component B (the only discovery presented in the article). Also they presented a near-infrared (J-band) trigonometric parallax of the system, measured using WIRCam on the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT), Mauna Kea, in seven epochs during the 2009—2010; and spectroscopy with the X-Shooter spectrograph at the European Southern Observatory's Very Large Telescope (VLT) Unit Telescope 2 (UT2) in Chile (the observations have been performed from May 5 to July 9, 2010), that allowed to calculate the temperature (and other physical parameters) of the two brown dwarfs.[6][4]

2012 Keck LGS-AO imaging[edit]

In 2012 CFBDSIR 1458+10 system was observed by Liu et al. with laser guide star (LGS) adaptive optics (AO) system of the 10 m Keck II Telescope on Mauna Kea, Hawai'i, using infra-red camera NIRC2 (the observations were made on 2012 April 13 (UT)). In 2012 Liu et al. published a paper in The Astrophysical Journal where they presented results of observations with Keck II LGS-AO of three brown dwarf binary systems, binarity of the two of which was first presented in this paper, and binarity of the other one, CFBDSIR 1458+10, was known before.[1]

Distance[edit]

Trigonometric parallax of CFBDSIR 1458+10, measured under The Hawaii Infrared Parallax Program by Dupuy & Liu in 2012, is 31.3 ± 2.5 mas, corresponding to a distance 31.9+2.8
−2.4
pc, or 104.2+9.0
−7.7
ly.[3]

CFBDSIR 1458+10 distance estimates

Source Parallax, mas Distance, pc Distance, ly Ref.
Delorme et al. (2010) ~23 ~75 [9]
Liu et al. (2011) 43.3 ± 4.5 23.1 ± 2.4 75.3 ± 7.8 [4]
Dupuy & Liu (2012)
(preprint version 1)
34.0 ± 2.6 29.4+2.4
−2.1
95.9+7.9
−6.7
[10]
Dupuy & Liu (2012) 31.3 ± 2.5 31.9+2.8
−2.4
104.2+9.0
−7.7
[3]

Non-trigonometric distance estimates are marked in italic. The best estimate is marked in bold.

Space motion[edit]

CFBDSIR 1458+10 has proper motion of about 420 milliarcseconds per year.[3]

CFBDSIR 1458+10 proper motion estimates

Source μ,
mas/yr
P. A.,
°
μRA,
mas/yr
μDEC,
mas/yr
Ref.
Delorme et al. (2010) 444 ± 16 157.5 ± 2.1 170 ± 16 -410 ± 16 [9][4]
Liu et al. (2011) 432 ± 6 154.2 ± 0.7 188 –389 [4]
Dupuy & Liu (2012)
(preprint version 1)
418.1 ± 3.2 155.4 ± 0.4 174.3 ± 3.0 –380.0 ± 3.2 [10]
Dupuy & Liu (2012) 419.6 ± 2.6 155.50 ± 0.28 174.0 ± 2.0 −381.8 ± 2.7 [3]

The most accurate estimates are marked in bold.

Physical properties[edit]

Using three models, Liu et al. calculated physical properties of CFBDSIR 1458+10 components.[4]

From Lyon/COND models and Lbol:

Component and
assumed age
Mass,
MJup
Teff,
K
log g,
cm/s2
P,
yr
A (for 1 Gyr) 12.1 ± 1.9 556 ± 48 4.45 ± 0.07
B (for 1 Gyr) 5.8 ± 1.3 360 ± 40 4.10 ± 0.10 35+28
−10
A (for 5 Gyr) 31 ± 4 605 ± 55 5.00 ± 0.08
B (for 5 Gyr) 14 ± 3 380 ± 50 4.58 ± 0.11 22+18
−6

From Burrows et al. (1997) models and Lbol):

Component and
assumed age
Mass,
MJup
Teff,
K
log g,
cm/s2
P,
yr
A (for 1 Gyr) 13 ± 2 550 ± 50 4.47 ± 0.07
B (for 1 Gyr) 6.8 ± 1.5 350 ± 40 4.14 ± 0.10 33+27
−7
A (for 5 Gyr) 36 ± 4 600 ± 60 5.06 ± 0.07
B (for 5 Gyr) 17 ± 4 380 ± 50 4.65 ± 0.12 20+17
−6

From Burrows et al. (2003) models and M(J):

Component and
assumed age
Mass,
MJup
Teff,
K
log g,
cm/s2
P,
yr
A (for 1 Gyr) 11.1 ± 0.7 479 ± 20 4.37 ± 0.03
B (for 1 Gyr) 7.6 ± 0.6 386 ± 15 4.19 ± 0.04 34+28
−10
A (for 5 Gyr) >25 >483 >4.85
B (for 5 Gyr) 18.8 ± 1.3 407 ± 15 4.69 ± 0.03 <22

The adopted surface temperature of B is 370 ± 40 K, and adopted mass is 6-15 MJup.[4]

Luminosity[edit]

At the time of its discovery, CFBDSIR 1458+10 B was the least luminous brown dwarf known.[4]

CFBDSIR 1458+10 bolometric luminosity estimates

Source Lbol/L (A) Lbol/L (B) Ref.
Liu et al. (2011) 10−6.02 ± 0.14
((1.1 ± 0.4) × 10−6)
10−6.74 ± 0.19
((2.0 ± 0.9) × 10−7)
[4]
Liu et al. (2012) 10−5.72 ± 0.13 10−6.53 ± 0.13 [1]

B's spectral class[edit]

In Liu et al. (2011) CFBDSIR 1458+10 B was assigned to the spectral class >T10,[4] it was proposed that CFBDSIR 1458+10 B may be a member of the Y spectral class of brown dwarfs.[9][4][11] In 2012 Liu et al. assigned it a spectral class Y0.[1]

Water clouds[edit]

Due to the low surface temperature for a brown dwarf, CFBDSIR 1458+10 B may be able to form water clouds in its upper atmosphere.[7]

See also[edit]

The other two brown dwarf binary systems, observed by Liu et al. with Keck II LGS-AO in 2012:[1]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ The other two ultracool brown dwarfs are CFBDSIR221903.07+002417.92 and CFBDSIR221505.06+003053.11. Three earlier type confirmed T dwarfs, as well as 49 unconfirmed candidates, are not listed in the article. (However, it is mentioned, that two of three earlier type confirmed T dwarfs are re-idenifications of already spectroscopically confirmed CFBDS brown dwarfs).

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x Liu, Michael C.; Dupuy, Trent J.; Bowler, Brendan P.; Leggett, S. K.; Best, William M. J. (2012). "Two Extraordinary Substellar Binaries at the T/Y Transition and the Y-band Fluxes of the Coolest Brown Dwarfs". The Astrophysical Journal 758 (1): 57. arXiv:1206.4044. Bibcode:2012ApJ...758...57L. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/758/1/57.  edit
  2. ^ a b c Kirkpatrick, J. Davy; Cushing, Michael C.; Gelino, Christopher R.; Griffith, Roger L.; Skrutskie, Michael F.; Marsh, Kenneth A.; Wright, Edward L.; Mainzer, A.; Eisenhardt, Peter R.; McLean, Ian S.; Thompson, Maggie A.; Bauer, James M.; Benford, Dominic J.; Bridge, Carrie R.; Lake, Sean E.; Petty, Sara M.; Stanford, S. A.; Tsai, Chao-Wei; Bailey, Vanessa; Beichman, Charles A.; Bloom, Joshua S.; Bochanski, John J.; Burgasser, Adam J.; Capak, Peter L.; Cruz, Kelle L.; Hinz, Philip M.; Kartaltepe, Jeyhan S.; Knox, Russell P.; Manohar, Swarnima; Masters, Daniel; Morales-Calderon, Maria; Prato, Lisa A.; Rodigas, Timothy J.; Salvato, Mara; Schurr, Steven D.; Scoville, Nicholas Z.; Simcoe, Robert A.; Stapelfeldt, Karl R.; Stern, Daniel; Stock, Nathan D.; Vacca, William D. (2011). "The First Hundred Brown Dwarfs Discovered by the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE)". The Astrophysical Journal Supplement 197 (2): 19. arXiv:1108.4677v1. Bibcode:2011ApJS..197...19K. doi:10.1088/0067-0049/197/2/19.  edit
  3. ^ a b c d e f g h i Dupuy, Trent J.; Liu, Michael C. (2012). "The Hawaii Infrared Parallax Program. I. Ultracool Binaries and the L/T Transition". The Astrophysical Journal Supplement 201 (2): 19. arXiv:1201.2465. Bibcode:2012ApJS..201...19D. doi:10.1088/0067-0049/201/2/19. 
  4. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q Liu, Michael C.; Delorme, Philippe; Dupuy, Trent J.; Bowler, Brendan P.; Albert, Loic; Artigau, Etienne; Reylé, Celine; Forveille, Thierry; Delfosse, Xavier (2011). "CFBDSIR J1458+1013B: A Very Cold (>T10) Brown Dwarf in a Binary System". The Astrophysical Journal 740 (2): 108. arXiv:1103.0014. Bibcode:2011ApJ...740..108L. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/740/2/108.  edit
  5. ^ Kirkpatrick, J. D.; Gelino, C. R.; Cushing, M. C.; Mace, G. N.; Griffith, R. L.; Skrutskie, M. F.; Marsh, K. A.; Wright, E. L.; Eisenhardt, P. R.; McLean, I. S.; Mainzer, A. K.; Burgasser, A. J.; Tinney, C. G.; Parker, S.; Salter, G. (2012). "Further Defining Spectral Type "Y" and Exploring the Low-mass End of the Field Brown Dwarf Mass Function". The Astrophysical Journal 753 (2): 156. arXiv:1205.2122. Bibcode:2012ApJ...753..156K. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/753/2/156.  edit
  6. ^ a b European Southern Observatory. "A Very Cool Pair of Brown Dwarfs", 23 March 2011
  7. ^ a b Space.com "Coldest Known Star Is a Real Misfit", 23 March 2011
  8. ^ Space.com "Y dwarf star? Because they're cool, that's Y!", 26 August 2011
  9. ^ a b c d Delorme, P.; Albert, L.; Forveille, T.; Artigau, E.; Delfosse, X.; Reylé, C.; Willott, C. J.; Bertin, E.; Wilkins, S. M.; Allard, F.; Arzoumanian, D. (2010). "Extending the Canada-France brown dwarfs survey to the near-infrared: first ultracool brown dwarfs from CFBDSIR". Astronomy and Astrophysics 518: A39. arXiv:1004.3876. Bibcode:2010A&A...518A..39D. doi:10.1051/0004-6361/201014277.  edit
  10. ^ a b Dupuy, Trent J.; Liu, Michael C. (2012). "The Hawaii Infrared Parallax Program. I. Ultracool Binaries and the L/T Transition". v1. arXiv:1201.2465 [astro-ph.SR]. 
  11. ^ Paul Gilster "Brown Dwarfs and Planets: A Blurry Boundary", Tau Zero Foundation, 23 March 2011

External links[edit]