Canadian Historical Association

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Canadian Historical Association
Abbreviation CHA
Formation 1922
Type Organizations based in Canada
Legal status
active
Purpose advocate and public voice, educator and network promoting historical research and scholarship.
Headquarters Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
Region served
Canada
Official language
English, French
president
Mary Lynn Stewart of Simon Fraser University
Affiliations CFHSS
Website http://www.cha-shc.ca/ www.cha-shc.ca/

The Canadian Historical Association (CHA) (French Société historique du Canada (SHC)) is a Canadian organization founded in 1922 for the purposes of promoting historical research and scholarship. Marius Barbeau, the anthropologist, was its founding Secretary. It publishes the Journal of the CHA, The CHA Bulletin and a well-respected series of booklets featuring concise treatments of particular aspects of Canadian history.

Other activities include lobbying government agencies, libraries, and archives on matters related to document preservation and availability. The current president of the CHA is Mary Lynn Stewart of Simon Fraser University.

Activities[edit]

A subcommittee of the CHA, the Canadian Committee on Labour History, publishes the journal Labour/Le Travail. It holds an annual conference together with other scholarly groups as part of the Congress of the Canadian Federation for the Humanities and Social Sciences (the "Learneds").

Other subcommittees include:

Prizes[edit]

As part of its mandate to promote and recognise excellence in historical research, the Canadian Historical Association:

  • The François-Xavier Garneau Medal, awarded every five years honours an outstanding Canadian contribution to historical research. Winners were: Louise Dechêne (1980), Michael Bliss (1985), John M. Beattie (1990), Joy Parr (1995), Gérard Bouchard (2000), Timothy Brook (2005), John C. Weaver (2010)[1]
  • The Sir John A. Macdonald Prize, an annual prize for non-fiction work of Canadian history judged to have made the most significant contribution to an understanding of the Canadian past
  • The Wallace K. Ferguson Prize, an annual prize for an outstanding scholarly book in a field of history other than Canadian history
  • Clio Prizes, given for meritorious publications or for exceptional contributions by individuals or organizations to regional history
  • The Albert B. Corey Prize, an award once every 2 years jointly with the American Historical Association, for best book dealing with the history of Canadian-American relations or the history of both countries.
  • Other prizes include: The John Bullen Prize, The CHA Journal Prize, The Canadian Aboriginal History Book Prize, The Hilda Neatby Prize, Political History Prize - Best Book, Political History Prize - Best Article, Public History Prize, The Eugene Forsey Prize, The Neil Sutherland Article Prize and Best article on the History of Sexuality.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

External links[edit]