Car dealership

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Typical car dealership (in this case a Jeep dealer) selling used cars outside, new cars in the showroom, as well as a vehicle entrance to the parts and service area in the back of the building.
Service and repair entrance
Auto dealer's service and repair facility

A car dealership or vehicle local distribution is a business that sells new or used cars at the retail level, based on a dealership contract with an automaker or its sales subsidiary. It employs automobile salespeople to sell their automotive vehicles. It may also provide maintenance services for cars, and employ automotive technicians to stock and sell spare automobile parts and process warranty claims. In 2013, the U.S. new car dealers market was close to $715 billion and the used car dealers industry almost $89 billion.[1]

Modern Car Dealerships[edit]

Car dealerships were traditionally large lots located out of town or on the edge of town centres and which relied on the skills of sales staff to sell vehicles. However, that model has begun to change and a number of automotive manufacturers have shifted the focus of their franchised retailers on to branding and technology. BMW has moved to create a standard look for its dealerships around the world and to introduce ‘product geniuses’ to liaise with customers.,,[2][3][4] Audi has experimented with a hi-tech showroom that allows customers to configure and experience cars on 1:1 scale digital screens,[5][6] while Mercedes-Benz has opened city centre brand stores to showcase its vehicles[7] and Tesla has opened city centre galleries where prospective customers can view cars that can only be ordered online.,[8][9]

Auto Transport[edit]

Auto Transport is used to move the vehicles from the factory to the dealerships. This includes country to country shipping as well as state to state shipping. Auto shipping and transport was largely a commercial activity conducted by dealers, manufacturers and brokers until the last ten to fifteen years. The explosion of Internet use has allowed this niche service to grow and reach the general consumer marketplace. This car shipping industry has grown explosively since the advent of the Internet. People are now able to purchase cars from anywhere in the world and have them shipped to their doorstep.

See also[edit]

Organisations[edit]

References[edit]

  • Genat, Robert (2004). The American Car Dealership. Motorbooks International. ISBN 9780760319345. 

External links[edit]