Centerburg, Ohio

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Centerburg, Ohio
Village
Nickname(s): The Heart of Ohio
Location of Centerburg, Ohio
Location of Centerburg, Ohio
Coordinates: 40°18′16″N 82°41′44″W / 40.30444°N 82.69556°W / 40.30444; -82.69556Coordinates: 40°18′16″N 82°41′44″W / 40.30444°N 82.69556°W / 40.30444; -82.69556
Country United States
State Ohio
County Knox
Government
 • Mayor Diana Stockmaster
Area[1]
 • Total 0.90 sq mi (2.33 km2)
 • Land 0.90 sq mi (2.33 km2)
 • Water 0 sq mi (0 km2)
Elevation [2] 1,220 ft (372 m)
Population (2010)[3]
 • Total 1,773
 • Estimate (2012[4]) 1,861
 • Density 1,970.0/sq mi (760.6/km2)
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) EDT (UTC-4)
ZIP code 43011
Area code(s) 740
FIPS code 39-13036[5]
GNIS feature ID 1060936[2]
Website http://www.centerburgoh.org/

Centerburg is a village in Knox County, Ohio, United States, along the North Fork of the Licking River. As of the 2010 census, the village population was 1,773.

Geography[edit]

Centerburg is located at 40°18′16″N 82°41′44″W / 40.304377°N 82.695580°W / 40.304377; -82.695580.[6]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the village has a total area of 0.90 square miles (2.33 km2), all of it land.[1]

Although Centerburg lies near the geographic center of the state, hence the name, the actual center of the state is located about 25 miles north-northeast of Columbus, in Delaware County.[7]

Demographics[edit]

2010 census[edit]

As of the census[3] of 2010, there were 1,773 people, 622 households, and 431 families residing in the village. The population density was 1,970.0 inhabitants per square mile (760.6 /km2). There were 679 housing units at an average density of 754.4 per square mile (291.3 /km2). The racial makeup of the village was 96.9% White, 1.2% African American, 0.1% Native American, 0.3% Asian, 0.1% from other races, and 1.4% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.2% of the population.

There were 622 households of which 42.6% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 46.9% were married couples living together, 16.7% had a female householder with no husband present, 5.6% had a male householder with no wife present, and 30.7% were non-families. 26.4% of all households were made up of individuals and 12.1% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.63 and the average family size was 3.19.

The median age in the village was 36.2 years. 28.5% of residents were under the age of 18; 8.5% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 26% were from 25 to 44; 22.6% were from 45 to 64; and 14.3% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the village was 47.3% male and 52.7% female.

2000 census[edit]

As of the census[5] of 2000, there were 1,432 people, 504 households, and 363 families residing in the village. The population density was 2,228.5 people per square mile (863.9/km2). There were 537 housing units at an average density of 835.7 per square mile (324.0/km2). The racial makeup of the village was 97.91% White, 0.49% African American, 0.35% Native American, 0.28% Asian, 0.07% from other races, and 0.91% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.07% of the population.

There were 504 households out of which 42.7% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 57.1% were married couples living together, 11.5% had a female householder with no husband present, and 27.8% were non-families. 25.6% of all households were made up of individuals and 11.7% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.63 and the average family size was 3.16.

In the village the population was spread out with 29.3% under the age of 18, 6.6% from 18 to 24, 30.4% from 25 to 44, 17.6% from 45 to 64, and 16.0% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 35 years. For every 100 females there were 100.0 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 90.2 males.

The median income for a household in the village was $39,750, and the median income for a family was $46,250. Males had a median income of $34,097 versus $27,353 for females. The per capita income for the village was $16,764. About 3.6% of families and 5.6% of the population were below the poverty line, including 5.7% of those under age 18 and 6.3% of those age 65 or over.

About[edit]

State Route 3, US Route 36, and State Route 314 all run near or through Centerburg.

During the days of early Ohio history, it served as a stagecoach stop, then later a railroad town. The Toledo and Ohio Central (T&OC, later known as the New York Central Railroad Eastern Branch), and the Cleveland, Akron, and Columbus (CA&C), later known as the Pennsylvania Railroad Akron Secondary, used Centerburg as a rural stop during the peak of passenger train travel in the US.

The Centerburg Local Schools have recently gone through a major makeover in the facilities. A new high school/junior high school campus was opened in 2003. The existing elementary campus also went through renovations. The mayor's office and council currently use the recently renovated Masonic Temple as city hall. In addition, the Centerburg Public Library is one of the oldest independent libraries in Central Ohio.

The Old Time Farming Festival, the Centerburg USA 4th of July Festival, and the nearby Hartford Fair are major events for people in the area.

The village and Hilliar Township is protected by the Knox County Sheriff's Department for law enforcement. The Central Ohio Joint Fire District takes care of fire and rescue duties with Hilliar, Liberty, Milford townships in Knox County; as well as South Bloomfield township in Morrow County and mutual aid to other parts of Central Ohio.

Notable residents[edit]

Publicity and media[edit]

Centerburg is also the name for Robert McCloskey's fictional hero Homer Price's hometown, but there appear to be few similarities between the actual town and McCloskey's storied version.

Centerburg was featured in part in the documentary ...So Goes the Nation, representing rural Ohio (and in turn rural America) during the 2004 presidential election.

In 2009, the Centerburg Local School Board voted to cancel that year's graduation ceremony in response to a cheating scandal,[8] even though only one person out of the entire 97-student graduating class was ever proven guilty of cheating. Parents and students responded with a protest at the high school which was ultimately televised and broadcast nationally in the United States. Ultimately, the parents and the Centerburg community came together and held a graduation ceremony for the graduating class at Hillar Park. Television stations in nearby Columbus covered the unofficial graduation ceremony held at Hillar Park. Footage of the protest and ceremony were also broadcast nationally on CNN. Despite voting to cancel the official graduation ceremony, every Centerburg school board member who was up for re-election in 2009 was re-elected, despite none receiving more than 30% of the total vote.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files 2010". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2013-01-06. 
  2. ^ a b "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  3. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2013-01-06. 
  4. ^ "Population Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2013-06-17. 
  5. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  6. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  7. ^ Science In Your Backyard: Ohio, USGS, 2008-07-08. Accessed 2008-11-19.
  8. ^ http://www2.nbc4i.com/news/2009/jun/07/seniors_hold_graduation_after_board_cancels_ceremo-ar-14107/