Construction worker

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Construction worker
An American carpenter wearing overalls, boots, and a hard hat bores a hole with a hand drill.
A Carpentrycarpenter, working on the construction of Douglas Dam in the United States, bores a hole with a hand drill. (June 1942)
Occupation
Occupation type
Vocation
Activity sectors
Construction
Description
Related jobs
Labourer; see Construction trades

A construction worker is a tradesman, laborer (by tradition considered an unskilled tradesman), or professional employed in the physical construction of the built environment and its infrastructure.

Duties[edit]

(by Emmanuel Evilafo) The term construction worker describes an abstract concept and is a meta-category for all those involved in construction; those performing the actual work.

The physical construction worker does not actually exist, all construction workers associate themselves with some subcategory of worker.

Construction workers - as anyone in an occupation that involves possible head strikes, heatstroke, frostbite, other weather elements, or hazardous contaminants - should always wear protective hard hats, giving birth to the descriptive term "hard hat worker".[1] Some managers of small construction organizations or those that employ undocumented migrant workers avoid the expense of hardhats and other safety equipment and practices that may slow production or require larger crews. For this reason hardhats are associated with those workers involved in commercial, large scale, and government jobs.

Construction workers work under the construction foreman.

While most construction workers learn on the job as an informal apprentice to an experienced tradesman, formal apprenticeship programs are common, particularly in developed countries with trade unions.

Trades[edit]

The division of labor of construction encompasses a diverse range of skilled and manual labor.

Among the most common construction trades are those of carpenter, electrician, heavy equipment operator, ironworker, laborer, mason, plasterer, plumber, pipefitter, sheet metal worker, steel fixer (also known as a "rodbuster"), and welder.

Controversy[edit]

In 2008, a Human Rights Watch report described unsafe and unfair working conditions and failure on the part of the Chinese government to enforce labor standards in the construction industry.[2] The International Labor Organization (ILO) estimated that, at the end of 2006, 90% of the 40 million construction workers in China were migrant workers. Many of the migrant workers turned to construction work after their farming communities collapsed into poverty.[2]

In the United States, illegal immigrant labor is prevalent in the construction industry. Because of the questionable legal status of these workers, employers often have the ability to commit crimes such as wage theft and violation of workplace standards without fear of facing consequences.[3]

Images[edit]

"Lunch atop a Skyscraper", 1932. Attributed to Charles C. Ebbets
Ironworkers erecting the steel frame of a new building at the Massachusetts General Hospital in the United States 
A steel fixer wears protective gloves while handling a coil of rebar, which will be embedded in a reinforced concrete column to strengthen it 
Workers wearing reflective vests, hard hats, and other protective clothing at a work site in New York City 

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ hardhat - definition and meaning
  2. ^ a b Richardson, Sophie, ed. (12 March 2008). One Year of My Blood: Exploitation of Migrant Construction Workers in Beijing (Technical report). Human Rights Watch. Retrieved 12 February 2013. 
  3. ^ "Construction Booming In Texas, But Many Workers Pay Dearly". National Public Radio (NPR). 2013. 

4. Jump up ^ "Evilafo Emmanuel

External links[edit]