Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Dignity of the Human Being with regard to the Application of Biology and Medicine

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Convention on Human Rights and Biomedicine
Oviedo Convention
The Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Dignity of the Human Being with regard to the Application of Biology and Medicine
Signed 4 April 1997
Location Oviedo, Spain
Effective 1 December 1999
Condition 5 Ratifications including 4 Council of Europe Members
Ratifiers 29
Depositary Secretary General of the Council of Europe
Languages English and French

The Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Dignity of the Human Being with regard to the Application of Biology and Medicine, otherwise known as the Convention on Human Rights and Biomedicine, or the Oviedo Convention, after Oviedo, Spain, the place where it was first signed, is a 1997 treaty drafted by the Council of Europe regarding various aspects of bioethics including on informed consent and human genome. It entered into force on 1 December 1999.

Further reading[edit]

  • Roberto Andorno, "The Oviedo Convention: A European Legal Framework at the Intersection of Human Rights and Health Law", Journal of International Biotechnology Law, 2005, n° 2, p. 133-143.[1]

External links[edit]