Cornetfish

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Cornetfish
Temporal range: 33–0Ma

Early Oligocene to Present[1]
Bluespotted cornetfish, Fistularia commersonii
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Actinopterygii
Order: Syngnathiformes
Family: Fistulariidae
Blainville, 1818
Genus: Fistularia
Linnaeus, 1758
Species

See text.

The cornetfishes are a small family, the Fistulariidae, of extremely elongated fishes in the order Syngnathiformes. The family consists of just a single genus, Fistularia, with four species, found worldwide in tropical and subtropical marine environments.

Ranging up to 200 cm (6.6 ft) in length, cornetfishes are as thin and elongated as many eels, but are distinguished by very long snouts, distinct dorsal and anal fins, and forked caudal fins whose center rays form a lengthy filament. The lateral line is well-developed and extends onto the caudal filament.[2]

They generally live in coastal waters or on coral reefs, where they feed on small fishes, crustaceans, and other invertebrates.[2]

Cornetfish are of minor interest for fishing, and can be found in local markets within their range.

Species[edit]

Currently, four recognized species are placed in this genus:[3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Sepkoski, Jack (2002). "A compendium of fossil marine animal genera". Bulletins of American Paleontology 364: p.560. Retrieved 2007-12-25. 
  2. ^ a b Orr, J.W. & Pietsch, T.W. (1998). Paxton, J.R. & Eschmeyer, W.N., ed. Encyclopedia of Fishes. San Diego: Academic Press. pp. 170–171. ISBN 0-12-547665-5. 
  3. ^ Froese, Rainer, and Daniel Pauly, eds. (2012). Species of Fistularia in FishBase. October 2012 version.

External links[edit]