Deming Municipal Airport

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Deming Municipal Airport
Deming Army Airfield
Deming Municipal Airport - New Mexico.jpg
2006 USGS Orthophoto
IATA: DMNICAO: KDMNFAA LID: DMN
Summary
Airport type Public
Owner City of Deming
Serves Deming, New Mexico
Elevation AMSL 4,314 ft / 1,315 m
Coordinates 32°15′44″N 107°43′14″W / 32.26222°N 107.72056°W / 32.26222; -107.72056Coordinates: 32°15′44″N 107°43′14″W / 32.26222°N 107.72056°W / 32.26222; -107.72056
Map
DMN is located in New Mexico
DMN
DMN
Location
Runways
Direction Length Surface
ft m
8/26 6,627 2,020 Asphalt
4/22 5,675 1,730 Asphalt
Statistics (2008)
Aircraft operations 28,655
Based aircraft 17
Source: Federal Aviation Administration[1]

Deming Municipal Airport (IATA: DMNICAO: KDMNFAA LID: DMN) is a city-owned airport two miles southeast of Deming, in Luna County, New Mexico.[1]

Facilities[edit]

The airport covers 2,870 acres (1,160 ha) at an elevation of 4,314 feet (1,315 m). It has two asphalt runways: 8/26 is 6,627 by 75 feet (2,020 x 23 m) and 4/22 is 5,675 by 60 feet (1,730 x 18 m).[1]

In the year ending April 13, 2008 the airport had 28,655 aircraft operations, average 78 per day: 65% general aviation, 32% military and 3% air taxi. 17 aircraft were then based at this airport: 94% single-engine and 6% multi-engine.[1]

World War II[edit]

AAF Bombardier School patch, 1943

Activated 15 November 1942. Conducted bombardier training for USAAF Gulf Coast Training Center (later Central Flying Command). The first class of bombardiers graduated on 6 March. In the next three years an estimated 12,000 cadets passed through the Deming Qin school. The bombardier trainer used was the Beech AT-11 Kansan.

Assigned to Second Air Force 16th Bombardment Training Wing on 31 December 1944. Conducted B-29 Superfortress group bombardment training until the end of World War II, when the training program at Deming wound down and was inactivated 18 December 1945. Airfield was closed on 31 January 1946. Eventually discharged to the War Assets Administration (WAA) and sold.

Airline flights (Frontier DC-3s) ended in 1953.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

 This article incorporates public domain material from websites or documents of the Air Force Historical Research Agency.

  • Shaw, Frederick J. (2004), Locating Air Force Base Sites History’s Legacy, Air Force History and Museums Program, United States Air Force, Washington DC, 2004.
  • Manning, Thomas A. (2005), History of Air Education and Training Command, 1942–2002. Office of History and Research, Headquarters, AETC, Randolph AFB, Texas ASIN: B000NYX3PC
  1. ^ a b c d FAA Airport Master Record for DMN (Form 5010 PDF), effective 2009-07-02.

External links[edit]