Dingbat

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This article is about the typesetter's ornament. For other uses, see Dingbat (disambiguation).
Poem typeset with generous use of decorative dingbats around the edges 1880s. Dingbats are not part of the text.

A dingbat is an ornament, character or spacer used in typesetting, sometimes more formally known as a printer's ornament or printer's character. The term continues to be used in the computer industry to describe fonts that have symbols and shapes in the positions designated for alphabetical or numeric characters.

Examples of characters included in Unicode (ITC Zapf Dingbats series 100 and others):

 
 

The advent of Unicode and the universal character set it provides allowed commonly used dingbats to be given their own character codes. Although fonts claiming Unicode coverage will contain glyphs for dingbats in addition to alphabetic characters, fonts that have dingbats in place of alphabetic characters continue to be popular, primarily for ease of input. Such fonts are also sometimes known as pi fonts.[1]

Some of the dingbat symbols have been used as signature marks, used in bookbinding to order sections.

Unicode[edit]

Dingbats
Range U+2700..U+27BF
(192 code points)
Plane BMP
Scripts Common
Assigned 192 code points
Unused 0 reserved code points
Source standard(s) ITC Zapf Dingbats series 100
Unicode version history
1.0.0 160 (+160)
3.2 174 (+14)
5.2 175 (+1)
6.0 191 (+16)
7.0 192 (+1)
Note: [2][3]

The Dingbats block (U+2700–U+27BF) was added to the Unicode Standard in June, 1993, with the release of version 1.1. This code block contains decorative character variants, and other marks of emphasis and non-textual symbolism. Most of its characters were taken from Zapf Dingbats.

Dingbats[1]
Official Unicode Consortium code chart (PDF)
  0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 A B C D E F
U+270x
U+271x
U+272x
U+273x
U+274x
U+275x
U+276x
U+277x
U+278x
U+279x
U+27Ax
U+27Bx
Notes
1.^ As of Unicode version 7.0
Ornamental Dingbats
Range U+1F650..U+1F67F
(48 code points)
Plane SMP
Scripts Common
Symbol sets Leaf ornaments, ornamental punctuation
Assigned 48 code points
Unused 0 reserved code points
Source standard(s) dingbat fonts Webdings, Wingdings, and Wingdings 2
Unicode version history
7.0 48 (+48)
Note: [4]

The Ornamental Dingbats block (U+1F650–U+1F67F) was added to the Unicode Standard in June 2014 with the release of version 7.0. This code block contains ornamental leaves, punctuation, and ampersands, quilt squares, and checkerboard patterns. It is a subset of dingbat fonts Webdings, Wingdings, and Wingdings 2.[5]

Ornamental Dingbats[1]
Official Unicode Consortium code chart (PDF)
  0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 A B C D E F
U+1F65x 🙐 🙑 🙒 🙓 🙔 🙕 🙖 🙗 🙘 🙙 🙚 🙛 🙜 🙝 🙞 🙟
U+1F66x 🙠 🙡 🙢 🙣 🙤 🙥 🙦 🙧 🙨 🙩 🙪 🙫 🙬 🙭 🙮 🙯
U+1F67x 🙰 🙱 🙲 🙳 🙴 🙵 🙶 🙷 🙸 🙹 🙺 🙻 🙼 🙽 🙾 🙿
Notes
1.^ As of Unicode version 7.0
Further information: Unicode symbols

See also[edit]

Dingbat fonts[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ https://www.adobe.com/type/browser/pdfs/PiFontInfo.pdf
  2. ^ "Unicode character database". The Unicode Standard. Retrieved 22 March 2013. 
  3. ^ The Unicode Standard Version 1.0, Volume 1. Addison-Wesley Publishing Company, Inc. 1990, 1991. ISBN 0-201-56788-1. 
  4. ^ "Unicode character database". The Unicode Standard. Retrieved 2 July 2014. 
  5. ^ "N4115: Proposal to add Wingdings and Webdings Symbols". Retrieved 2 July 2014. 

External links[edit]