E. 1999 Eternal

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E. 1999 Eternal
Studio album by Bone Thugs-n-Harmony
Released July 25, 1995
Recorded August 1994 – May 1995
Trax Recording Studios
Los Angeles,CA, U.S.
Genre Midwest Hip Hop, G-funk, gangsta rap,
Length 57:18 (clean version)
68:06 (explicit version)
71:52 (re-release)
Label Ruthless, Relativity
Producer

Eazy-E (exec.)

DJ U-Neek (exec.)
Bone Thugs-n-Harmony chronology
Creepin on ah Come Up
(1994)
E. 1999 Eternal
(1995)
The Art of War
(1997)
Singles from E. 1999 Eternal
  1. "1st of tha Month"
    Released: June 15, 1995
  2. "East 1999"
    Released: November 21, 1995
  3. "Tha Crossroads"
    Released: February 1, 1996

E. 1999 Eternal is the second studio album by American hip hop group Bone Thugs-N-Harmony, released July 25, 1995, on Ruthless Records. The album was released four months after the death of rapper Eazy-E, the group's mentor and the executive producer of the album. Both the album and single "Tha Crossroads" are dedicated to him. Following up on the surprise success of their breakthrough single "Thuggish Ruggish Bone", it became a popular album and received positive reviews from music critics, earning praise for the group's melodic rapping style. The album title is a portmanteau of the then-future year 1999 and Cleveland's eastside neighborhood centering around East 99th Street and St. Clair Avenue where the group is based from.

E. 1999 Eternal became the group's best-selling album, with over five million copies sold in the United States and ten million worldwide. It topped the US Billboard 200 for two consecutive weeks. The album was nominated for the inaugural Grammy Award for Best Rap Album, ultimately losing to Naughty by Nature's Poverty's Paradise at the 1996 Grammy Awards.[1]

Reception[edit]

Professional ratings
Review scores
Source Rating
Allmusic 4.5/5 stars[2]
Robert Christgau (C)[3]
Entertainment Weekly (B-)[4]
Los Angeles Times 3.5/4 stars[5]
NME (7/10)[6]
Q 5/5 stars[6]
Rolling Stone 3/5 stars[7]
The Rolling Stone Album Guide 4/5 stars[8]
Stylus Magazine (favorable)[9]
Vibe (favorable)[10]
RapReviews 10/10 stars[11]

Critical reviews of E. 1999 Eternal. Jason Birchmeier of Allmusic described it as "an impressive debut full-length that dismisses any notion that the group was merely a one-hit wonder" and claims that it "maintains a consistent tone, one that's menacing and somber, produced entirely by DJ U-Neek, a Los Angeles-based producer who frames the songs with dark, smoked-out G-funk beats and synth melodies.The Source hailed it The Top 100 Rap Albums of 1990s which was met with a 4 1/2 mic rating"[2]


Track listing[edit]

No. Title Writer(s) Producer(s) Length
1. "Da Introduction"  
U-Neek 4:28
2. "East 1999"  
  • Bone
  • U-Neek
  • Tony-C
  • U-Neek
  • Tony-C[a]
4:24
3. ""Eternal""  
  • Bone
  • U-Neek
  • Tony-C
  • U-Neek
  • Tony-C[a]
  • Kenny McCloud[a]
4:06
4. "Crept and We Came"  
  • Bone
  • U-Neek
  • U-Neek
  • Tony-C[a]
5:06
5. "Down '71 (The Getaway)"  
  • Bone
  • U-Neek
  • Tony-C
U-Neek 4:52
6. "Mr. Bill Collector"  
  • Bone
  • U-Neek
  • Tony-C
  • U-Neek
  • Tony-C[a]
5:04
7. "Budsmokers Only"  
  • Bone
  • U-Neek
  • Tony-C
U-Neek 3:34
8. "Tha Crossroads"  
  • Bone
  • U-Neek
  • Tony-C
  • U-Neek
  • Tony-C[a]
3:44
9. "Me Killa"  
  • Bone
  • U-Neek
  • U-Neek
  • McCloud[a]
0:58
10. "Land of tha Heartless"  
  • Bone
  • U-Neek
  • McCloud
  • U-Neek
  • Bone[a]
3:08
11. "No Shorts, No Losses"  
  • Bone
  • U-Neek
  • McCloud
  • U-Neek
  • Bone[a]
4:54
12. "1st of Tha Month"  
U-Neek 5:15
13. "Buddah Lovaz"  
  • Bone
  • U-Neek
  • Tony-C
  • U-Neek
  • Tony-C[a]
4:43
14. "Die Die Die"  
  • Bone
  • U-Neek
U-Neek 2:51
15. "Mr. Ouija 2"  
  • Bone
  • U-Neek
  • U-Neek
  • Bone[a]
1:19
16. "Mo' Murda"  
  • Bone
  • U-Neek
  • Tony-C
  • U-Neek
  • Tony-C[a]
5:47
17. "Shotz to Tha Double Glock"  
  • U-Neek
  • McCloud[a]
4:44
Notes
Sample credits

Personnel[edit]

  • Eric "Eazy-E" Wright - Executive Producer, Album Concept
  • D.J. U-Neek - Producer, Recording
  • Layzie Bone - Producer
  • Anne Catalino - Engineer
  • Aaron Connor - Engineer and Recording
  • Don Cunningham - Design and Art Direction
  • Tony Cowan - Recording
  • Madeleine Smith - Sample Clearance

Appearances[edit]

Chart history[edit]

Album[edit]

Chart positions from Billboard magazine (North America)

Year Chart positions
Billboard 200 Top R&B/Hip Hop Albums
1995 1 1

Singles[edit]

Year Song Chart positions
Billboard Hot 100 Hot R&B/Hip-Hop Singles & Tracks Hot Rap Singles Hot Dance Music/Maxi-Singles Sales
1995 1st of tha Month 14 12 4 13
East 1999 62 39 8
1996 Tha Crossroads 1 1 1 21

End of decade charts[edit]

Chart (1990–1999) Position
U.S. Billboard 200[12] 54
Preceded by
Dreaming of You by Selena
Billboard 200 number-one album
August 12–19, 1995
Succeeded by
Cracked Rear View by Hootie & the Blowfish

Accolades[edit]

Publication Country Accolade Year Rank
About.com United States Best Rap Albums of 1995[13] 2008 6

References[edit]

  1. ^ Grammy Best Rap Albums Winners. About.com. Retrieved on 2010-08-17.
  2. ^ a b "E. 1999 Eternal". Allmusic. Retrieved 2012-02-14. 
  3. ^ "CG: Bone Thugs-N-Harmony". Robert Christgau. Retrieved 2012-02-14. 
  4. ^ David Browne (1995-08-04). "E. 1999 Eternal Review | Music Reviews and News". EW.com. Retrieved 2012-02-14. 
  5. ^ "Album Reviews : BONE THUGS-N-HARMONY *** 1/2, "E.1999 Eternal" Relativity - Los Angeles Times". Articles.latimes.com. 1995-07-22. Retrieved 2012-02-14. 
  6. ^ a b "Bone Thugs-N-Harmony - E 1999 Eternal CD Album". Cduniverse.com. 1998-11-24. Retrieved 2012-06-27. 
  7. ^ S.H. Fernando Jr. (1995-11-02). "Bone Thugs-N-Harmony: E. 1999 Eternal : Music Reviews". Rolling Stone. Archived from the original on 2007-05-06. Retrieved 2012-06-25 Crtiical response. 
  8. ^ The new Rolling Stone album guide - Nathan Brackett, Christian David Hoard - Google Books. Books.google.com. Retrieved 2012-02-14. 
  9. ^ "Bone Thugs-N-Harmony - E.1999 Eternal - On Second Thought". Stylus Magazine. Retrieved 2012-02-14. 
  10. ^ Vibe - Google Books. Books.google.com. Retrieved 2012-02-14. 
  11. ^ http://www.rapreviews.com/archive/BTTL_e1999eternal.html
  12. ^ Geoff Mayfield (December 25, 1999). 1999 The Year in Music Totally '90s: Diary of a Decade - The listing of Top Pop Albums of the '90s & Hot 100 Singles of the '90s. Billboard. Retrieved October 15, 2010. 
  13. ^ Adaso, Henry. Best Rap Albums of 1995. About.com. Retrieved 2010-05-10.

External links[edit]