February 2008 lunar eclipse

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Total lunar eclipse
2008/2/21 [1]
Saros (member) 133 (26)
Recent <S <T < > T> S>
February 2008 total lunar eclipse John Buonomo.jpg
Telescopic view, greatest eclipse, from North Billerica, MA.
Lunar eclipse chart close-08feb20.png
The moon passes right to left through the earth's southern shadow
Gamma[1] -0.3993
Duration (hr:mn:sc)
Totality 0:50:58
Partial 3:26:08
Penumbral 5:42:18
Contacts
P1 0:34:59 UTC
U1 1:42:59 UTC
U2 3:00:34 UTC
Greatest 3:26:05 UTC
U3 3:51:32 UTC
U4 5:09:07 UTC
P4 6:17:16 UTC
Lunar eclipse chart-08feb21.png
At descending node in Leo

A total lunar eclipse occurred on the evening of Wednesday, February 20, and morning of Thursday, February 21, 2008. It was visible in the eastern evening sky on February 20 for all of North and South America, and on February 21 in the predawn western sky from most of Africa and Europe.

The total lunar eclipse was the first of the two lunar eclipses in 2008, with the second, the August 16, 2008 event being partial.[2] The next total lunar eclipse occurred on December 21, 2010.

Viewing[edit]

The eclipse was visible in the eastern evening sky on February 20 for all of North and South America, and on February 21 in the predawn western sky from most of Africa and Europe.

Lunar eclipse from moon-08feb21.png
These simulated views of the earth from the center of the moon during the lunar eclipse show where the eclipse is visible on earth.

The penumbral eclipse began at 00:35 UTC (February 21), and ended at 6:17. A partial eclipse existed from 1:43 until 3:00, followed by 51 minutes of totality (3:00 - 3:51), and then partial again from 3:51 until 5:09. (For local times, see Timing.)

It is possible to mistake the appearance of partial eclipse as the moon being in a different phase, but the shadow from the eclipse changes much more rapidly.[3]

The bright star Regulus of Leo and the planet Saturn were prominent very near the moon during the total eclipse portion. Shortly before the eclipse began, Regulus was occulted by the moon in parts of the far Southern Atlantic ocean and Antarctica.

Map[edit]

Visibility Lunar Eclipse 2008-02-21.png

Relation to other lunar eclipses[edit]

Lunar year series[edit]

Lunar eclipse series sets from 2006–2009
Descending node   Ascending node
Saros #
and photo
Date
Viewing
Type
Chart
Saros #
and photo
Date
Viewing
Type
Chart
113
Penumbral lunar eclipse 2006 March 14 Warrenton VA.jpg
2006 Mar 14
Lunar eclipse from moon-2006Mar14.png
penumbral
Lunar eclipse chart close-06mar14.png
118
Partial lunar eclipse Sept 7 2006-Mikelens.jpg
2006 Sep 7
Lunar eclipse from moon-2006Sep07.png
partial
Lunar eclipse chart close-2006Sep07.png
123
Red moon during lunar eclipse.jpg
2007 Mar 03
Lunar eclipse from moon-2007Mar03.png
total
Lunar eclipse chart close-07mar03.png
128
Lunar Eclipse.jpg
2007 Aug 28
Lunar eclipse from moon-2007Aug28.png
total
Lunar eclipse chart close-2007aug28.png
133
February 2008 total lunar eclipse John Buonomo.jpg
2008 Feb 21
Lunar eclipse from moon-2008Feb21.png
total
Lunar eclipse chart close-08feb20.png
138
20080816eclipsed2.jpg
2008 Aug 16
Lunar eclipse from moon-2008Aug16.png
partial
Lunar eclipse chart close-2008Aug16.png
143
Penumbral lunar eclipse Feb 9 2009 NavneethC.jpg
2009 Feb 9
Lunar eclipse from moon-2009Feb09.png
penumbral
Lunar eclipse chart close-09feb09.png
148
Penumbral lunar eclipse Aug 6 2009 John Walker.gif
2009 Aug 06
Lunar eclipse from moon-2009Aug06.png
penumbral
Lunar eclipse chart close-2009aug06.png
Last set 2005 Apr 24 Last set 2005 Oct 17
Next set 2009 Dec 31 Next set 2009 Jul 07


Saros series[edit]

This lunar eclipse is part of series 133 of the Saros cycle, which repeats every 18 years and 11 days. Series 133 runs from the year 1557 until 2819. The previous eclipse of this series occurred on February 9, 1990 and the next will occur on March 3, 2026.[4][5][6]

It is the 6th of 21 total lunar eclipses in series 133. The first was on December 28, 1917. The last (21st) will be on August 3, 2278. The longest two occurrences of this series (14th and 15th) will last for a total of 1 hour and 42 minutes [7] on May 18, 2152 and May 30, 2170.

Metonic cycle (19 years)[edit]

This is the fourth of five Metonic lunar eclipses.

The Metonic cycle repeats nearly exactly every 19 years and represents a Saros cycle plus one lunar year. Because it occurs on the same calendar date, the earth's shadow will in nearly the same location relative to the background stars.

Metonic lunar eclipse sets 1951–2027
Descending node   Ascending node
Saros Date Type Saros Date Type
103 1951 Feb 21 Penumbral 108 1951 Aug 17 Penumbral
Lunar eclipse chart-1951Feb21.png Lunar eclipse chart-1951Aug17.png
113 1970 Feb 21 Partial 118 1970 Aug 17 Partial
Lunar eclipse chart-1970Feb21.png Lunar eclipse chart-1970Aug17.png
123 1989 Feb 20 Total 128 1989 Aug 17 Total
Lunar eclipse chart-1989Feb20.png Lunar eclipse chart-1989Aug17.png
133 2008 Feb 21 Total 138 2008 Aug 16 Partial
Lunar eclipse chart-2008Feb21.png Lunar eclipse chart-08aug16.png
143 2027 Feb 20 Penumbral 148 2027 Aug 17 Penumbral
Lunar eclipse chart-2027Feb20.png Lunar eclipse chart-2027Aug17.png

Timing[edit]

The moon entered the penumbral shadow at 00:35 UTC, and the umbral shadow at 1:43. Totality lasted for 51 minutes, between 3:01 and 3:52. The moon left the umbra shadow at 5:09 and left the penumbra shadow at 6:17.[8]

Total Lunar Eclipse[9]
Event North and South America Europe and Africa
Evening of February 20, 2008 Morning of February 21, 2008
AKST
(-9h)
PST
(-8h)
MST
(-7h)
CST
(-6h)
EST
(-5h)
AST
(-4h)
GMT
(0h)
CET
(+1h)
EET
(+2h)
U1 Partial began 15:43 16:43 17:43 18:43 19:43 20:43 01:43 02:43 03:43
U2 Total began 17:01 18:01 19:01 20:01 21:01 22:01 03:01 04:01 05:01
Mid-eclipse 17:26 18:26 19:26 20:26 21:26 22:26 03:26 04:26 05:26
U3 Total ended 17:51 18:51 19:51 20:51 21:51 22:51 03:51 04:51 05:51
U4 Partial ended 20:09 21:09 22:09 23:09 00:09 01:09 05:09 06:09 07:09

Photo gallery[edit]

Composites[edit]

Composicao.jpg
Eclipse observed from Sandim, Vila Nova de Gaia, Portugal. Lat:41º02'22" N Lon:8º30'50" W.
Feb 20 2008 Lunar Eclipse Collage.jpg
Eclipse observed from Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada. Each image is roughly taken 5 minutes apart.
Lunar Eclipse 02-20-08.jpg
Images taken in 3-5 minute Intervals - from Bradley, Illinois.
Lunareclipse21feb08.jpg
Eclipse observed from Halton Hills, Ontario, Canada. From 01:47 to 03:15 UTC, each image is roughly taken 5min apart.
Christian Frausto Bernal - Eclipse Lunar - Febrero 2008 (by-sa).jpg
Lunar eclipse observed from Tepic, Nayarit, Mexico.
Lunar eclipse february 20-2008.jpg
Eclipse observed from Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada
Lunar Eclipse Composite Feb 20 2008.jpg
Lunar eclipse observed from Burlington, Ontario, Canada
Feb 20 08 Eclipse Merge.jpg
Observed from Baltimore, MD, USA from 2:30 to 3:01 UTC. Lunar north is near left.

North America[edit]

Canada[edit]

USA (west)[edit]

USA (east)[edit]

South America[edit]

Europe and Africa[edit]

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Gamma is the minimum distance of the Moon's shadow axis from Earth's centre in Earth radii at greatest eclipse.
  2. ^ sunearth.gsfc.nasa.gov
  3. ^ http://www.spaceweather.com/eclipses/20feb08e/John-Doukoumopoulos2.jpg
  4. ^ "Lunar Eclipses: 2001 to 2100". 2008. Archived from the original on 2008-01-29. Retrieved 2008-02-22. 
  5. ^ "Lunar Eclipses: 1901 to 2000". 2008. Archived from the original on 2008-01-28. Retrieved 2008-02-22. 
  6. ^ "Active Saros Cycles for the 20th and 21st Centuries". 2008. Retrieved 2008-02-22. 
  7. ^ "Hermit Eclipse: Saros Series 133". 2014. Retrieved 2014-05-27. 
  8. ^ "Total lunar eclipse of 2008 Feb 21". NASA. 2008-02-21.  Eclipse Predictions by Fred Espenak, NASA's GSFC
  9. ^ "NASA - Total Lunar Eclipse: February 20, 2008". 2008. Archived from the original on 2008-02-21. Retrieved 2008-02-22. 

External links[edit]