First Presbyterian Church and Lewis Pintard House

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
First Presbyterian Church and
Lewis Pintard House
First Presbyterian Church and Lewis Pintard House, Pintard Ave. New Rochelle ,(French church).JPG
Side of the First Presbyterian Church
First Presbyterian Church and Lewis Pintard House is located in New York
First Presbyterian Church and Lewis Pintard House
Location Pintard Ave., New Rochelle, New York
Coordinates 40°54′16″N 73°47′7″W / 40.90444°N 73.78528°W / 40.90444; -73.78528Coordinates: 40°54′16″N 73°47′7″W / 40.90444°N 73.78528°W / 40.90444; -73.78528
Area 3 acres (12,000 m2)[1]
Built 1710
Architect John Russell Pope
Architectural style Colonial Revival
Governing body Private
NRHP Reference # 79001648
Added to NRHP September 07, 1979[2]

The First Presbyterian Church and Lewis Pintard House is a pair of adjacent historic buildings in downtown New Rochelle, New York, USA. The church and its adjoining manse, the Pintard House, are on a 3-acre (1.2 ha) lot.[1][3] It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1979.[2]

The First Presbyterian Church had its origins as the French Church formed by New Rochelle's early Huguenot settlers. The church is a Colonial revival structure with granite quoins, designed by John Russell Pope, architect of the Jefferson Memorial. Completed in 1929, it replaced the congregation’s first church, which had been destroyed by fire.[1]

Adjacent to the church building is the Pintard House, one of New Rochelle’s oldest remaining houses. It was constructed in part by Alexander Allaire sometime before 1710. In 1765 it became the home of a prominent New York City merchant named Pierre Vallade who came to New Rochelle on his retirement. After Vallade died in 1770, his widow married Lewis Pintard, whose name came to be associated with the house. Pintard was a local merchant and Revolutionary War patriot who was appointed by the Continental Congress to provide assistance to American prisoners held in the City of New York during British control. The Pintard House was moved to its current location in 1928.[1][3][4]

Lewis Pintard House

References