Glasgow Warriors

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Glasgow Warriors
Glasgow warriors badge.png
Full name Glasgow Warriors
Founded 1996; 18 years ago (1996)
Location Glasgow, Scotland
Ground(s) Scotstoun Stadium (Capacity: 10,000)
Chairman Charles Shaw
Coach(es) Gregor Townsend
Captain(s) Alastair Kellock
Most caps Graeme Morrison (175)
Top scorer Dan Parks (1105)
Most tries DTH van der Merwe (31)
League(s) Guinnes Pro12
2013–14 2nd (playoff finalist)
Team kit
2nd kit
Official website
www.glasgowwarriors.org
Rugby current event.svg Current season

Glasgow Warriors, formerly Glasgow Rugby, is one of the two professional rugby teams from Scotland. The team plays in the Guinness Pro12 and the EPCR European club tournaments along with its oldest rivals, Edinburgh Rugby. The Glasgow Warriors team plays its home games at Scotstoun Stadium[1][2]

History[edit]

Glasgow Rugby was created to compete in the Heineken Cup, because the SRU did not think that Scottish club sides would be able to compete against the best teams from France and England.[3] Glasgow, however, did not compete in the Heineken Cup until the 1997–98 season.

Because of the SRU's high debt, partly as a result of the redevelopment of Murrayfield there was a recognised need for further reorganisation. After two seasons, Glasgow merged with the Caledonia Reds to form a team that would be known as Glasgow Caledonians.[4]

Concerns about attendances at games became a concern again at the time of the 1999 World Cup, by which time a Welsh/Scottish League had been announced. In essence, this would be the Welsh First Division augmented by the two Scottish sides.[5]

The Celtic League began in the autumn of 2001; Glasgow reached the semi-finals of the inaugural competition, but struggled thereafter. From the 2002–03 season the 'Caledonian' label was dropped at the start of the 2002–03 season, with the team name becoming Glasgow Rugby.[6] Starting with the 2005–06 season, the team was again rebranded, this time as the Glasgow Warriors.[3]

The forced merger came just after Glasgow had shown some signs of progress by qualifying for the Heineken Cup quarter-final play-offs, in which they suffered their heaviest defeat (90–19) to Leicester Tigers.[7] The intention was that the combined strength of the new teams would build on such modest progress and initially some very successful results were achieved, including a 1999 win against Leicester (30–17), but overall the team lacked consistency.

In 2004/5 Glasgow had been fifth, the best placing of the three Scottish teams that existed at that time.[8]

In the summer of 2012 Glasgow Warriors moved from Firhill to Scotstoun, which had previously been the club's training base.[9]

Season 2006/07[edit]

Magners

League

Played Won Lost Drawn Points

For

Points

Against

Points

Difference

Tries

For

Tries

Against

Try

Bonus

Losing

Bonus

Points
7th 20 11 0 9 434 419 +15 42 49 3 2 49

After impressive preseason displays, Glasgow Warriors played its first game in the new Celtic League against Newport Gwent Dragons, losing 23–24 after a last minute penalty.[10]

Glasgow then did not lose another home game until Ulster came to Hughenden in January 2007.[11] Glasgow drew away to English side Saracens in the European Challenge Cup, en route to a quarter-final berth, but was drawn against Saracens and lost 23–19 at Vicarage Road.

The Warriors defeated both Scottish rivals just a week apart Edinburgh [12] and Border Reivers,[13] and at the start of April, title hopefuls Leinster arrived at Hughenden. Glasgow won the game 26–20,[14] before following it up with a good away win against Irish side Connacht.[15] The next game saw Glasgow travel to Ravenhill to face Ulster, one of only 2 sides to beat them at Hughenden, and the team stunned the home crowd by winning the game.[16]

Then it was the turn of Welsh side, the Neath-Swansea Ospreys (a side that would win the title at Netherdale the following week) to travel to Hughenden. The Ospreys crossed the Glasgow try-line within 45 seconds, and crossed twice more to take a (26–9) lead just minutes from half-time, before Glasgow's Dan Parks converted his own try to take it to 26–16 at half time. In the second half, Parks kicked another penalty before setting up Graeme Morrison for a try, which he converted to level the scores. Parks kicked a penalty from just shy of the half way line to take a 3 point lead and the Ospreys couldn't find a way out of their own half for the remaining 20 minutes.[17]

The Warriors failed to make it 5 in a row the following week, but coach Sean Lineen was happy with his team's performance over the season nonetheless.

Season 2007/08[edit]

Magners

League

Played Won Lost Drawn Points

For

Points

Against

Points

Difference

Tries

For

Tries

Against

Try

Bonus

Losing

Bonus

Points
5th 18 10 1 7 340 349 -9 31 38 1 3 46

Season 2008/09[edit]

Magners

League

Played Won Lost Drawn Points

For

Points

Against

Points

Difference

Tries

For

Tries

Against

Try

Bonus

Losing

Bonus

Points
7th 18 7 0 11 349 375 -26 36 41 4 5 37

Season 2009/10[edit]

Magners

Playoff

Played Won Lost Drawn Points

For

Points

Against

Points

Difference

Tries

For

Tries

Against

Try

Bonus

Losing

Bonus

Points
SF 18 11 2 5 390 321 +69 31 24 2 1 51

Season 2010/11[edit]

Pro12

Playoff

Played Won Lost Drawn Points

For

Points

Against

Points

Difference

Tries

For

Tries

Against

Try

Bonus

Losing

Bonus

Points
DNQ 22 6 1 15 401 543 -142 33 48 1 6 33

Season 2011/12[edit]

Pro12

Playoff

Played Won Lost Drawn Points

For

Points

Against

Points

Difference

Tries

For

Tries

Against

Try

Bonus

Losing

Bonus

Points
SF 22 13 4 5 445 321 +124 34 23 2 3 64

Season 2012/13[edit]

Pro12

Playoff

Played Won Lost Drawn Points

For

Points

Against

Points

Difference

Tries

For

Tries

Against

Try

Bonus

Losing

Bonus

Points
SF 22 16 6 0 541 324 +217 66 30 9 3 76

Season 2013/14[edit]

Pro12

Playoff

Played Won Drawn Lost Points

For

Points

Against

Points

Difference

Tries

For

Tries

Against

Try

Bonus

Losing

Bonus

Points
2nd 22 18 4 0 484 309 +175 53 22 4 3 79

Honours[edit]

Current standings[edit]

Pro12 Table watch · edit · discuss
Team Played Won Drawn Lost Points For Points Against Points Difference Tries For Tries Against Try Bonus Losing Bonus Points
1 Ireland Munster 9 7 0 2 217 133 +84 22 9 2 2 32
2 Wales Ospreys 9 7 0 2 237 138 +99 22 10 2 1 31
3 Scotland Glasgow Warriors 9 7 0 2 221 161 +60 23 11 3 0 31
4 Ireland Ulster 9 6 1 2 224 119 +105 24 9 3 2 31
5 Ireland Leinster 9 5 1 3 226 148 +78 25 16 4 2 28
6 Ireland Connacht 9 6 1 2 162 139 +23 17 13 1 0 27
7 Wales Scarlets 9 4 2 3 194 160 +34 20 16 2 1 23
8 Scotland Edinburgh 9 3 1 5 130 213 −83 12 27 0 1 15
9 Wales Cardiff Blues 9 2 1 6 197 253 −56 20 24 2 1 13
10 Italy Zebre 9 2 0 7 108 227 −119 10 24 0 1 9
11 Wales Newport Gwent Dragons 9 1 0 8 128 211 −83 8 23 1 3 8
12 Italy Benetton Treviso 9 0 1 8 125 267 −142 13 34 1 1 4

If teams are level at any stage, tiebreakers are applied in the following order:[18]

  1. number of matches won;
  2. the difference between points for and points against;
  3. the number of tries scored;
  4. the most points scored;
  5. the difference between tries for and tries against;
  6. the fewest number of red cards received;
  7. the fewest number of yellow cards received.

Green background (rows 1 to 4) are play-off places, and earn a place in the European Rugby Champions Cup.
Blue background indicates teams outside the play-off places, that earn a place in the European Rugby Champions Cup. The top team from each country will qualify.
Yellow background indicates the team that advances to a play-off semi-final against the seventh placed side from the Aviva Premiership, or the 2014–15 European Rugby Challenge Cup winners if they have not already qualified for the competition.[19]
Plain background indicates teams that earn a place in the European Rugby Challenge Cup.

Current squad[edit]

For player movements leading up to the 2014–15 season, see List of 2014–15 Pro12 transfers#Glasgow Warriors.

2014-15 Note: Flags indicate national union as has been defined under WR eligibility rules. Players may hold more than one non-WR nationality.

Player Position Union
Fraser Brown Hooker Scotland Scotland
Kevin Bryce Hooker Scotland Scotland
Dougie Hall Hooker Scotland Scotland
Pat MacArthur Hooker Scotland Scotland
Alex Allan Prop Scotland Scotland
Michael Cusack Prop England England
Ryan Grant Prop Scotland Scotland
George Hunter Prop Scotland Scotland
Rossouw de Klerk Prop South Africa South Africa
Euan Murray Prop Scotland Scotland
Gordon Reid Prop Scotland Scotland
Jon Welsh Prop Scotland Scotland
Jerry Yanuyanutawa Prop Fiji Fiji
Jonny Gray Lock Scotland Scotland
Alastair Kellock (c) Lock Scotland Scotland
Leone Nakarawa Lock Fiji Fiji
Tom Ryder Lock Scotland Scotland
Tim Swinson Lock Scotland Scotland
Adam Ashe Flanker Scotland Scotland
Will Bordill Flanker Scotland Scotland
James Eddie Flanker Scotland Scotland
Chris Fusaro Flanker Scotland Scotland
Rob Harley Flanker Scotland Scotland
Tyrone Holmes Flanker Scotland Scotland
Andy Redmayne Flanker Scotland Scotland
Josh Strauss Number 8 South Africa South Africa
Ryan Wilson Number 8 Scotland Scotland
Player Position Union
Nikola Matawalu Scrum-half Fiji Fiji
Murray McConnell Scrum-half Scotland Scotland
Henry Pyrgos Scrum-half Scotland Scotland
Fraser Lyle Fly-half Scotland Scotland
Finn Russell Fly-half Scotland Scotland
Duncan Weir Fly-half Scotland Scotland
Mark Bennett Centre Scotland Scotland
James Downey Centre Ireland Ireland
Alex Dunbar Centre Scotland Scotland
Peter Horne Centre Scotland Scotland
Richie Vernon Centre Scotland Scotland
Rory Hughes Wing Scotland Scotland
Lee Jones Wing Scotland Scotland
Sean Lamont Wing Scotland Scotland
Sean Maitland Wing Scotland Scotland
D.T.H. van der Merwe Wing Canada Canada
Tommy Seymour Wing Scotland Scotland
Connor Braid Fullback Canada Canada
Stuart Hogg Fullback Scotland Scotland
Peter Murchie Fullback Scotland Scotland

Elite Development Players[edit]

Coaches[edit]

Notable former players[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "New signing Byron looks to lord it at Scotstoun". Now Rugby. 2012-04-19. Retrieved 2012-10-25. 
  2. ^ "Scottish rugby chiefs eye up Scotstoun Stadium for Tonga friendly". Daily Record. 2012-05-16. Retrieved 2012-10-25. 
  3. ^ a b rugby.visitscotland.com. "Glasgow Warriors trivia". VisitScotland.com. Retrieved 2009-09-14. 
  4. ^ Neil Drysdale (2008-10-26). "Caledonia Reds history". The Sunday Times (London). Retrieved 2009-09-14. 
  5. ^ "Celtic League history". 188RugbyUnion. 2009-05-20. Retrieved 2009-09-14. 
  6. ^ "Scottish clubs renamed". BBC Sport. 2001-08-08. Retrieved 2009-09-14. 
  7. ^ Tony Wallace (1997-11-02). "Leicester 90 – Glasgow 19". The Independent (London). Retrieved 2009-09-14. 
  8. ^ "2004/05 Celtic League". Magners League. Retrieved 2009-09-14. 
  9. ^ "Glasgow set up Leinster tie". Irish Independent. 2012-05-05. 
  10. ^ "Sep 2006 Glasgow v Dragons match report". Magners League. 2006-09-01. Retrieved 2009-09-14. 
  11. ^ "Jan 2007 Glasgow v Ulster match report". Magners League. 2007-01-06. Retrieved 2009-09-14. 
  12. ^ "Dec 2006 Glasgow v Edinburgh match report". Magners League. 2006-12-22. Retrieved 2009-09-14. 
  13. ^ "Dec 2006 Borders v Glasgow match report". Magners League. 2006-12-29. Retrieved 2009-09-14. 
  14. ^ "Apr 2007 Glasgow v Leinster match report". Magners League. 2007-04-06. Retrieved 2009-09-14. 
  15. ^ "Apr 2007 Connacht v Glasgow match report". Magners League. 2007-04-14. Retrieved 2009-09-14. 
  16. ^ "Apr 2007 Ulster v Glasgow match report". Magners League. 2007-04-27. Retrieved 2009-09-14. 
  17. ^ "May 2007 Glasgow v Ospreys match report". Magners League. 2007-05-04. Retrieved 2009-09-14. 
  18. ^ Competition Rule 3.5 "Summary of Key Rules". Pro12. Retrieved 13 November 2013. 
  19. ^ "Future of European Rugby resolved" (Press release). RFU. 10 April 2014. Retrieved 11 June 2014. 

External links[edit]