HMS Thrush (1889)

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HMS Thrush.jpg
HMS Thrush, First Class gunboat by W. Fred Mitchell
Career (UK) Royal Navy Ensign
Name: HMS Thrush
Builder: Scotts, Greenock
Cost: £39,000[1]
Yard number: 262[1]
Launched: 22 June 1889
Fate: Coastguard 1906
Cable ship 1915
Salvage vessel 1916
Wrecked on 11 April 1917
General characteristics [1]
Class & type: Redbreast-class first-class gunvessel
Displacement: 805 tons
Length: 165 ft 0 in (50.3 m) pp
Beam: 31 ft 0 in (9.4 m)
Draught: 11 ft 0 in (3.35 m) min, 13 ft 9 in (4.19 m) max
Installed power: 1,200 ihp (890 kW)
Propulsion:
  • Triple expansion steam engine
  • 2 × boilers
  • Single screw
Sail plan: Barquentine-rigged
Speed: 13 kn (24 km/h)
Range: 2,500 nmi (4,600 km) at 10 kn (19 km/h)[1]
Complement: 76
Armament:
  • 6 × 4-inch/25-pounder QF guns
  • 2 × 3-pounder QF guns
  • 2 × machine guns

HMS Thrush was a Redbreast-class[1] composite gunboat,[2] the third ship of the name to serve in the Royal Navy.

Design[edit]

The Redbreast-class were designed by Sir William Henry White, the Royal Navy Director of Naval Construction in 1888.[1]

Construction[edit]

Thrush was launched on 22 June 1889 at Greenock.[3] Her triple-expansion reciprocating steam engine was built by the Greenock Foundry, and developed 1,200 indicated horsepower (890 kW), sufficient to propel her at 13 kn (24 km/h) through her single screw.

Career[edit]

Her first station was the North America and West Indies Station based in Halifax where, in 1891, she was commanded by HRH Prince George, later to become King George V of the United Kingdom.[2] In 1896 Thrush, along with Sparrow, played a part in the 40 minute Anglo-Zanzibar War.[4] She was also on active service during the Second Boer War between October 1899 and June 1902 where she was commanded by Lieutenant W H D'Oyly.[5]

From 1906 Thrush worked for HM Coastguard before becoming a cable ship in 1915.[3] She then became a salvage ship in 1916 before being wrecked off Glenarm in Northern Ireland on 11 April 1917.[3]

References[edit]

Bibliography[edit]