Hadera Market bombing

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Hadera Market bombing
Part of the Second Intifada militancy campaign
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The attack site
Location Hadera's open-air market, Hadera, Israel
Coordinates 32°26′08″N 34°55′14.66″E / 32.43556°N 34.9207389°E / 32.43556; 34.9207389
Date October 26, 2005
Attack type
suicide bombing
Deaths 7 Israeli civilians (+ 1 bomber)
Non-fatal injuries
55 Israeli civilians
Perpetrators Islamic Jihad organization claimed responsibility

The Hadera Market bombing was a suicide bombing which occurred on October 26, 2005 at the entrance to the main fruit and vegetable open-air market in Hadera. The site of the attack was chosen in order to cause maximum number of casualties. Seven people were killed in the attack,[1][2] and 55 were injured, of them five in severe condition.[3]

The Islamic Jihad claimed responsibility for the attack.[4]

The attack[edit]

On Wednesday, October 26, 2005, during the afternoon hours, a Palestinian suicide bomber who wore an explosive belt hidden underneath his clothes approached the open market place in the small Israeli coastal town of Hadera. The market place was busy with shoppers in advance of a Jewish Holiday, with many stocking up for the weekend. The suicide bomber detonated the explosive device at the market. The blast killed seven civilians[1][2] and injured 55 people, of them five in severe condition.[3]

Two Palestinian Islamist militant group Islamic Jihad claimed responsibility for the attack and stated that the attack was carried out by a 20-year-old Palestinian named Hassan Abu Zeid who originated from the Palestinian town Qabatiya in the West Bank.[5]

Fatalities[edit]

  • Ya'akov Rahmani, 68, of Hadera[10]
  • Genia Poleis, 66, of Hadera[11]
  • Larissa Grishchenko, 39, of Hadera[1][2][12] – died 4 years later of her injury

The perpetrators[edit]

The Islamist militant organization Palestinian Islamic Jihad claimed responsibility, and stated that the attack was carried out in revenge for the Israeli targeted killing of the Islamic Jihad commander Luay Saadi. Abu-Muaman the Organization's leader stated in the press that "This attack is merely a preliminary response by the Palestinian rebellious groups, and harder retaliation is on its way."

Official reactions[edit]

Involved parties

 Israel:

  • An Israeli government spokesman called on the Palestinian Authority to increase its efforts to "disarm and dismantle the terror organization."[13]
  • Mark Regev, a spokesperson for the Israeli foreign ministry responded that "Abbas says the right thing... But if we have a criticism it's that he talks the right talk, we're waiting for him to follow through on these commitments. Now there have been some steps taken but we really need to see a serious disarming of these extremist groups."

 Palestinian territories:

  • Palestinian National Authority - Palestinian Authority Chairman Mahmoud Abbas condemned the attack, saying: "It harms Palestinian interests and could widen the cycle of violence, chaos, extremism and bloodshed.".[14]
  • Palestinian negotiator Saeb Erekat denounced the attack and stated that he hoped the peace between the two sides would not be damaged.
  • Khader Habib, a spokesperson for the Islamic Jihad stated that "The Islamic Jihad movement was committed to the truce, and is still committed to the truce, but this truce should be mutual. We cannot tolerate a one-sided truce."
International

 United States: White House spokesman Scott McClellan condemned the attack and called on the Palestinian leadership to crack down on the Palestinian militants.[14]

External links[edit]

References[edit]