Health shake

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A health shake is a blended drink intended to be, or marketed as being, healthful for one to consume. They are a more nutrient rich relative of the Milkshake.[citation needed] Slim-Fast is a prominent example, marketed as a weight loss aid. Bodybuilders sometimes drink a protein shake to help build and repair muscles. Some health shakes are intended as a meal replacement, often as a supposedly healthier alternative to traditional sugar- and fat-laden breakfasts. However, some health shakes have a greater amount of calories than a plate of pancakes or a cheese omelet.[1] Athletes in training, however, may require more calories and nutrients in their diet than less active people.

Any number of ingredients may be put into a health shake, including superfoods, bee pollen, peanut butter, coconut oil, bean powder, clover sprouts, etc. Health shakes can be quite similar to smoothies, although they are not necessarily chilled and tend to not contain large quantities of fruit.

Green smoothie[edit]

Green smoothie preparation

Green smoothies are a type of health shake or smoothie, made by blending green raw leafy vegetables, such as spinach, kale, swiss chard, collard greens, celery, parsley or broccoli with fruit such as oranges, kiwis, apples, mangoes, pears, and bananas, some of which may be frozen, and water or ice.[2] To balance flavor and nutrition the typical ratio in a green smoothie is about 60% fruit to 40% leafy greens.[3][4][5]

Companies have begun producing green smoothies or green juice drinks; these products may be pasteurized. At least one blender company has ads which specifically target the intention of producing green smoothies with the blender once purchased, which offers a booklet of green smoothie recipes.[6]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Silver Diner Health Shake, TheDailyPlate 
  2. ^ Caldwell, Kim (2009) How Green Smoothies Saved My Life: A Guide for Using Green Smoothies, Uplifted Thinking, and Live Food to Enhance Your Life, p.12. ISBN 0-615-30290-4.
  3. ^ Boutenko, Victoria "Ode to a Green Smoothie", first published 2005 newsletter, RawFamily.com. Reprinted in Kyssa, Natasha (2009). The SimplyRaw Living Foods Detox Manual, beginning p.29. ISBN 1-55152-250-0.
  4. ^ Zavasta, Tonya (2009), "Smooth Moves: Enjoy the Benefit of Green Smoothies and Puddings", Raw Food and Hot Yoga, p. 39, ISBN 0-9742434-9-3, "A green smoothie...is a mixture of about 60 percent fruit and 40 percent leafy greens blended together in a delicious, nourishing beverage." 
  5. ^ Smith Jones, Susan (2008). Health Bliss, p.179. ISBN 1-4019-1241-9. "...about 50-60 percent fruit and 40-50 percent greens."
  6. ^ (Nov 2008 - Jan 2009). Organic Gardening, p.44. Vol. 56, No. 1. ISSN 1536-108X.

Further reading[edit]

External links[edit]