Herb Cain

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For the former San Francisco Chronicle columnist, see Herb Caen. For the U.S. presidential candidate, see Herman Cain.
Herb Cain
Born (1912-12-24)December 24, 1912
Newmarket, ON, CAN
Died February 23, 1982(1982-02-23) (aged 69)
Newmarket, ON, CAN
Height 5 ft 11 in (180 cm)
Weight 165 lb (75 kg; 11 st 11 lb)
Position Left Wing
Shot Left
Played for Montreal Maroons
Montreal Canadiens
Boston Bruins
Playing career 1933–1950

Herbert James Cain (December 24, 1912 in Newmarket, Ontario - February 23, 1982 in Newmarket, Ontario) was a Canadian professional ice hockey left winger who played 13 seasons in the National Hockey League for the Montreal Maroons, Montreal Canadiens, and Boston Bruins.

Early life[edit]

Herbert Cain was born in Newmarket, Ontario to John (Jack) and Elizabeth "Eliza" Cain (née Currier). He played junior hockey for the Newmarket Redmen and the Hamilton Tigers of the OHA.

Playing career[edit]

Cain's NHL career started when he joined the Montreal Maroons of the NHL in the 1933–34 season. He split that season between the Maroons and the Hamilton Tigers of the OHA. In 1934–35 Cain briefly played for the Windsor Bulldogs of the IHL. With the exception of a one game stint with the Hershey Bears in 1940–41, he would remain in the NHL for the next 11 seasons.

As a member of the Montreal Maroons, Cain played on a line with Gus Marker and Bob Gracie. They were dubbed the "Green Line" and their combined offensive prowess led Montreal to their second Stanley Cup Championship in 1934–35. Cain was dealt to the Montreal Canadiens in the fall of 1938. After one season in Montreal, he was traded to the Boston Bruins for Charlie Sands and Ray Getliffe.

Cain had his most productive years years in Boston. Playing on a line with future Hall of Fame inductee Bill Cowley, he helped the Bruins win the Stanley Cup in 1940–41. Cain went on to win the NHL scoring title in 1943–44 with 82 points. His total set a record for points in a season which stood until Gordie Howe scored 86 in 1950–51. Despite criticism that the war-depleted league had led to a freak season - his mark was more than double his previous season high - Cain was selected as a Second Team All-Star at left wing and was runner up to Clint Smith of the Chicago Black Hawks for the Lady Byng Trophy.

The following season, he scored 32 goals for Boston, but fell well short of his previous point mark, and in the season thereafter (in which players serving in the military returned to the NHL) his totals plummeted further. In 1946–47 Cain was sent to the Hershey Bears of the American Hockey League and he went on to help the Bears win the first Calder Cup, the first in franchise history. Cain ended his professional career in 1949–50 as a member of the Hershey Bears.

Cain remains the only eligible former NHL scoring champion not inducted into the Hockey Hall of Fame. He was the last active player in the NHL to have ever played for the Montreal Maroons.

In total, Cain played 571 NHL regular season games.

Cain's older brother Jack Cain played professional hockey in the AHL for the New Haven Eagles and the Hershey Bears. His cousin Jim "Dutch" Cain also played in the NHL.

Awards & achievements[edit]

Records[edit]

1943–44 - Set NHL record for most points in a season with 82

Career statistics[edit]

    Regular season   Playoffs
Season Team League GP G A Pts PIM GP G A Pts PIM
1932–33 Hamilton Tigers OHASr 0 14 5 19 0
1933–34 Montreal Maroons NHL 31 4 5 9 14 4 0 0 0 0
1933–34 Hamilton Tigers OHASr
1934–35 Montreal Maroons NHL 44 20 7 27 13 7 1 0 1 2
1935–36 Montreal Maroons NHL 47 5 13 18 16 3 0 1 1 0
1936–37 Montreal Maroons NHL 43 13 17 30 18 5 1 1 2 0
1937–38 Montreal Maroons NHL 47 11 19 30 10
1938–39 Montreal Canadiens NHL 45 13 14 27 26 3 0 0 0 2
1939–40 Boston Bruins NHL 48 21 10 31 30 6 1 3 4 2
1940–41 Hershey Bears AHL 1 1 0 1 0
1940–41 Boston Bruins NHL 40 8 10 18 6 11 3 2 5 5
1941–42 Boston Bruins NHL 35 8 10 18 2 5 1 0 1 0
1942–43 Boston Bruins NHL 45 18 18 36 19 7 4 2 6 0
1943–44 Boston Bruins NHL 48 36 46 82 4
1944–45 Boston Bruins NHL 50 32 13 45 16 7 5 2 7 0
1945–46 Boston Bruins NHL 48 17 12 29 4 9 0 2 2 2
1946–47 Hershey Bears AHL 59 36 30 66 19
1947–48 Hershey Bears AHL 49 19 19 38 25
1948–49 Hershey Bears AHL 49 25 35 60 10 11 4 6 10 6
1949–50 Hershey Bears AHL 41 12 14 26 8
NHL Totals 571 206 194 400 178 67 16 13 29 13

External links[edit]

See also[edit]

Preceded by
Doug Bentley
NHL Scoring Champion
1944
Succeeded by
Elmer Lach