Jean-Louis Debré

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Jean-Louis Debré
Jldebre2012.jpg
Jean-Louis Debré in 2012
President of the Constitutional Council of France
Incumbent
Assumed office
5 March 2007
President Jacques Chirac,
Nicolas Sarkozy,
François Hollande
Appointed by Jacques Chirac
Preceded by Pierre Mazeaud
President of the National Assembly
In office
25 June 2002 – 2 March 2007
President Jacques Chirac
Preceded by Raymond Forni
Succeeded by Patrick Ollier
French Interior Minister
In office
18 May 1995 – 4 June 1997
President Jacques Chirac
Prime Minister Alain Juppé
Preceded by Charles Pasqua
Succeeded by Jean-Pierre Chevènement
Member of the French National Assembly
for Eure (1st constituency)
In office
1 June 1997 – 5 March 2007
Preceded by Françoise Charpentier
Succeeded by Françoise Charpentier
In office
2 April 1986 – 18 June 1995
Succeeded by Françoise Charpentier
Mayor of Évreux
In office
18 March 2001 – 12 March 2007
Preceded by Roland Plaisance
Succeeded by Jean-Pierre Nicolas
Personal details
Born (1944-09-30) 30 September 1944 (age 69)
Toulouse, France
Nationality French
Political party UMP
Spouse(s) Anne-Marie Debré (d. 2007)
Children Charles
Guillaume
Marie-Victoire
Alma mater École nationale de la magistrature
Institut d'Études Politiques de Paris
Website Website

Jean-Louis Debré (born 30 September 1944)[1] is a conservative French political figure. He was President of the National Assembly of France from 2002 to 2007 and has been President of the Constitutional Council since 2007.

Biography[edit]

Debré was born in Toulouse.[1] The son of former Prime Minister Michel Debré and the brother of politician Bernard Debré, he was member of the Neo-Gaullist party Rally for the Republic (RPR) then of the Union for a Popular Movement (UMP).

Jean-Louis Debré, outside of politics, is a career judge.[2]

Debré was first elected to the National Assembly in the 1986 parliamentary election; he was re-elected in 1988, 1993, 1997, and 2002 as a deputy from the first constituency of Eure.[1] He was Minister of the Interior in Alain Juppé's governments (1995–1997), and has been criticized for having allowed the armed Corsican clandestine press conference, and was responsible for the controversial evacuation of Saint-Bernard church in Paris, which was occupied by illegal immigrants (so called sans-papiers) on hunger strikes.

He was elected as Mayor of Evreux in 2001, serving in that post until 2007.

He was leader of the RPR group in the National Assembly from 1997 to 2002 and then President of the National Assembly from 2002 to 2007. Faithful to President Chirac, he frequently criticized UMP leader Nicolas Sarkozy. He resigned as President of the National Assembly three months before the end of his tenure after he was appointed as President of the Constitutional Council by Chirac on 22 February 2007.[3] He replaced Pierre Mazeaud in the latter position.

Political career[edit]

President of the Constitutional Council of France : Since 2007.

Governmental function

Minister of Interior : 1995–1997.

Electoral mandates

National Assembly of France

President of the National Assembly of France : 2002–2007 (Resignation, became President of the Constitutional Council of France in 2007).

President of the Rally for the Republic Group in the National Assembly : 1997–2002. Elected in 1997.

Member of the National Assembly of France for Eure (1st constituency) : 1986–1995 (Became minister in 1995) / 1997–2007 (Resignation became President of the Constitutional Council of France in 2007). Elected in 1986, reelected in 1988, 1993, 1997, 2002.

General Council

Vice-president of the General Council of Eure : 1998–2001 (Resignation).

General councillor of Eure : 1992–2001 (Resignation). Reelected in 1998.

Municipal Council

Mayor of Evreux : 2001–2007 (Resignation).

Municipal councillor of Evreux : 1989–1995 / 2001–2007 (Resignation).

Deputy-mayor of Paris : 1995–1997 (Resignation).

Councillor of Paris : 1995–1997 (Resignation).

Agglomeration community Council

President of the Agglomeration community of Évreux : 2001–2007. (Resignation).

Member of the Agglomeration community of Évreux : 2001–2007. (Resignation).

Political functions

Spokesman of the Rally for the Republic : 1993–1995.

Bibliography[edit]

  • Le Pouvoir Politique (co-author, 1976)
  • Le Gaullisme (co-author, 1977)
  • La Justice au XIXe Siècle, les Magistrats (1980)
  • Les Républiques des Avocats (1984)
  • Le Curieux (1986)
  • En mon for intérieur (1997)
  • Pièges (1998)
  • Le Gaullisme n'est pas une Nostalgie (1999)
  • Quand les Brochets font Courir les Carpes (2008)
  • Les oubliés de la République (2008)

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c CV at National Assembly website.
  2. ^ Decree of the President of the Republic putting Jean-Louis Debré on leave from his judgeship in order to be member of the National Assembly.
  3. ^ L'Express.fr, 23 February 2007; Decision of the President of the Republic of 23 February 2007 appointing Jean-Louis Debré as president of the Constitutional council.
Political offices
Preceded by
Charles Pasqua
Minister of the Interior
1995–1997
Succeeded by
Jean-Pierre Chevènement
Preceded by
Raymond Forni
President of the National Assembly
2002–2007
Succeeded by
Patrick Ollier
Preceded by
Pierre Mazeaud
President of the Constitutional Council
2007–present
Incumbent