Jennifer Haigh

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Jennifer Haigh
Born 1968
Pennsylvania, United States
Occupation Author
Nationality American
Genres Literary Fiction
Notable work(s) Mrs. Kimble, Baker Towers, The Condition, Faith

Jennifer Haigh is an American novelist and short story writer.

She was born in 1968 in Barnesboro, a Western Pennsylvania coal town 85 miles northeast of Pittsburgh in Cambria County. She attended Dickinson College in Carlisle, Pennsylvania and earned a Master of Fine Arts degree from the Iowa Writers' Workshop in 2002. Her fiction has been published in Granta, Ploughshares, The Virginia Quarterly Review, Good Housekeeping, and many other publications. As of January 2014, Haigh lives in Boston.

Awards and honors[edit]

Bibliography[edit]

Her debut novel Mrs. Kimble—telling the story of a mysterious con man named Ken Kimble through the eyes of his three wives – (2003) won the PEN/Hemingway Award for outstanding debut fiction.

Her next novel, Baker Towers (2005), depicts the rise and fall of a western Pennsylvania coal town in the years following World War II. It was a New York Times bestseller and won the 2006 PEN/L.L. Winship award for best book by a New England writer.

Her third novel, The Condition, was published by HarperCollins in July 2008. It traces the dissolution of a proper New England family when their only daughter is diagnosed with Turner's Syndrome, a chromosomal abnormality that keeps her from going through puberty.

Her novel, Faith (2011), tells the story of a suburban Boston priest accused of molesting a boy in his parish.

Her short story, "Paramour", published in the Winter 2011–12 issue of Ploughshares, was selected for inclusion in the Best American Short Stories anthology in 2012.[1]

In 2013, her short story collection News From Heaven revisited the town of Bakerton, Pennsylvania, and features encore appearances by several characters from the Baker Towers.

Novels[edit]

  • Mrs Kimble (2003)
  • Baker Towers (2005)
  • The condition (2008)
  • Faith (2011)

Short fiction[edit]

  • Jennifer Haigh (Autumn 2008). "Broken star". Granta 103: 92–114. 

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Ploughshares Awards". 2012. Retrieved May 28, 2012. 

External links[edit]