Jeremy Goss

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Jeremy Goss
Personal information
Full name Jeremy Goss
Date of birth (1965-05-11) 11 May 1965 (age 49)
Place of birth Oekolia, Cyprus
Height 5 ft 11 in (1.80 m)
Playing position Midfielder
Youth career
Norwich City
Senior career*
Years Team Apps (Gls)
1983–1996 Norwich City 188 (14)
1996–1997 Hearts 10 (0)
1997–1998 Colchester United 0 (0)
1998–1999 King's Lynn 21 (0)
Total 198 (14)
National team
1991–1996 Wales 9 (0)
* Senior club appearances and goals counted for the domestic league only.
† Appearances (Goals).

Jeremy "Jerry" Goss (born 11 May 1965 in Oekolia, Cyprus) is a former Welsh international footballer. He is most noted for playing for Norwich City from 1984 to 1996. He came to prominence during their successful period in the mid-1990s. Goss played in the midfield, and was known for scoring spectacularly but not often, and was noted for his superior volleying skills and high level of stamina.

Early career[edit]

Goss attended Pent Valley Secondary School in Folkestone and represented Kent Schools at football. He also played for England Schools at under-18 level. He was a member of Norwich City's FA Youth Cup winning team in 1983. Of his early years at the club, he speaks of having to do the traditional apprentice roles, including getting the sandwiches for the senior players' lunch, adding that, "...if you got it wrong, you got a bollocking.."[1]

Goss, nicknamed "Gossa", a reference to Paul Gascoigne,[2] was mostly a squad or bench player up until the 1990–91 season where he became more regular in the starting lineup. His vastly improving form earned him a callup to the Welsh international team, and the start of the Premier League coincided with Goss's and Norwich's most productive period in the top flight in 1992–93. His stunning volleyed goal against Leeds United at Elland Road in the opening month of the 1993–94 season was voted "Goal of the month" on Match of the Day, and to this day he describes it as technically the best goal he ever scored.[3] Goss scored six league goals during Norwich's first European season.

Munich tie[edit]

Goss scored spectacularly, most notably in Norwich City's away win over Bayern Munich in the UEFA Cup, the first time notably that an English side had ever beaten Bayern at their home ground now frequently cited as Norwich's most famous win and goal- and again in the 1–1 return leg which put Norwich through. "There's no doubt Bayern assumed it would be easy."[4]

Later career[edit]

He also has the distinction of scoring the last goal in front of the terraced Spion Kop at Anfield. He was awarded a testimonial during the 1993–94 season, which fittingly became his most successful season with the club.

Goss remained a regular until Norwich were relegated from the Premiership in the 1994–95 season. Upon Martin O'Neill's appointment as Norwich manager in 1995–96, Goss was initially was dropped into the reserves as the new manager was looking to trim the "Premier League" wage bill. He was later recalled and scored a spectacular goal on his return against Derby County.

All told, Goss made 188 league appearances for Norwich, scoring 14 goals. After leaving Norwich in 1996, Goss had spells at Heart of Midlothian and Colchester United before signing for local non-league side King's Lynn. Goss retired from playing in 1999, and then worked for Norwich City as a community ambassador until January 2010, when the post was terminated; Goss declined an alternative role in the club's Football in the Community team.[5] In March 2010, Goss returned to Norwich City to assist reserve team manager Ian Crook.[6]

Moving on from his association with Norwich City football club, Goss continues to deliver his own; humorous after dinner speeches, student development and as a Leadership and Motivational programmes.

Gossy currently spends most of his time in support of the Norfolk and Norwich Association of the Blind (www.NNAB.org.uk), raising funds to provide the range of services to the Blind people of Norwich and Norfolk. This has recently culminated in the 1300 mile sponsored bicycle ride, retracing the 1993 Norwich City European Cup run from Norwich to Vitesse Arnham, to Bayern Munich, to Inter Milan. Followed extensively on Twitter #BacktoBayern and with a GPS tracking application on his site, affectionally named "Where's Gossy" (http://www.jeremygoss.co.uk/wheres-gossy/).

All this in support of raising funds for the Blind and through donations at http://uk.virginmoneygiving.com/fundraiser-web/fundraiser/showFundraiserProfilePage.action?userUrl=JeremyGoss

International career[edit]

Goss made his senior debut for Wales in a 1–0 friendly win over Iceland at Cardiff Arms Park. The last of his nine senior caps for Wales came five years later on 2 June 1996 in a 5–0 win in San Marino at the start of the 1998 World Cup qualifiers. Goss was also on the pitch for one of the most disappointing matches in the history of Welsh international football, on 17 November 1993, when a Paul Bodin penalty miss ended hopes of playing at the 1994 World Cup as Wales lost 2–1 to Romania in their final World Cup qualifying game at Cardiff Arms Park.[7]

Personal life[edit]

His wife Margaret gave birth to identical twins, three months premature:

"Within two hours of birth their weight had gone down to 2lb and it was touch and go. We lived in the hospital for six weeks and it was an emotional time when we took them home for the first time a few days before Christmas. Now they look like any normal seven-month old babies and for that we are very grateful."[4] Jacob and Joseph

Goss, whose father having served in the British Army, is also a member of the Forces2Canaries Supporters Group.[citation needed] In 2002, Norwich fans voted Goss into the club's Hall of Fame.[citation needed]

Goss worked with author Edward Couzens-Lake on his life story. Gossy: The Autobiography (Amberley Publishing) which was published in August 2014.[8]

Honours[edit]

  • FA Youth Cup winner 1983

External links[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Backpass" Magazine (by Edward Couzens-Lake) Autumn 2009 edition
  2. ^ Samuel, Martin (20 February 2008). "Why armchair fans can no longer be turned on by tales of the unexpected". The Times (London). Retrieved 20 June 2009. [dead link]
  3. ^ http://www.jeremygoss.co.uk/
  4. ^ a b Haylett, Trevor (23 May 1999). "Bavarian Goss finish still shines brightly". The Independent. Retrieved 13 November 2009. 
  5. ^ http://www.eveningnews24.co.uk/content/Sport/story.aspx?brand=ENOnline&category=Sport&tBrand=ENOnline&tCategory=Sport&itemid=NOED15%20Jan%202010%2011%3A13%3A39%3A473 End of an Era for City Legend
  6. ^ "Goss back to help with reserves". Norwich City F.C. 9 March 2010. Retrieved 9 March 2010. 
  7. ^ [1]
  8. ^ http://www.amazon.co.uk/Gossy-Autobiography-Jeremy-Goss/dp/1445619016