John D. W. Corley

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John D. W. Corley
General John Corley, official Air Force photo.jpg
General John D.W. Corley
Born 1951 (age 62–63)
Allegiance United States United States
Service/branch  United States Air Force
Years of service 1973–2009
Rank US-O10 insignia.svg General
Commands held Air Combat Command
Vice Chief of Staff, USAF
355th Wing
33d Operations Group
8th Fighter Squadron
Awards Air Force Distinguished Service Medal (3)
Defense Superior Service Medal
Legion of Merit
Bronze Star
Defense Meritorious Service Medal

John Donald Wesley Corley (born 1951) is a retired four-star general in the United States Air Force. He previously served as the commander of Air Combat Command from October 2007 to September 10, 2009 and as the 32nd Vice Chief of Staff of the Air Force from September 2005 to September 2007. He retired from the Air Force on November 1, 2009.

General Corley is responsible for organizing, training, equipping and maintaining combat-ready forces for rapid deployment and employment while ensuring strategic air defense forces are ready to meet the challenges of peacetime air sovereignty and wartime defense. ACC operates more than 1,200 aircraft, 27 wings, 17 bases and more than 200 operating locations worldwide with 105,000 active-duty and civilian personnel. When mobilized, the Air National Guard and Air Force Reserve contribute more than 900 aircraft and 56,000 people to Air Combat Command.

As the Combat Air Forces lead agent, ACC develops strategy, doctrine, concepts, tactics and procedures for air and space power employment. The command provides conventional, nuclear and information warfare forces to all unified commands to ensure air, space and information superiority for warfighters and national decision-makers. ACC can also be called upon to assist national agencies with intelligence, surveillance and crisis response capabilities.

Prior to his current assignment General Corley was Vice Chief of Staff, Headquarters U.S. Air Force, Washington, D.C. As Vice Chief, he presided over the Air Staff and served as a member of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Requirements Oversight Council.

General Corley entered the Air Force after graduating from the United States Air Force Academy in 1973. He earned his wings at Reese Air Force Base, Texas, in 1974. His aviation career includes more than 3,000 flying hours with combat experience. He has commanded at the squadron, group and wing levels. His staff positions comprise a mix of operational and joint duties in Tactical Air Command, Headquarters U.S. Air Force and the Joint Staff.

As Combined Air Operations Center Director during Operation Enduring Freedom, the general orchestrated more than 11,000 combat missions striking more than 4,700 targets, including 250 attacks against the Al Qaida and Taliban leadership. He directed the safe recovery of isolated personnel during the largest combat search and rescue mission in 50 years and was awarded the Bronze Star Medal.

Education[edit]

Assignment[edit]

  • October 1973 – November 1974, student, undergraduate pilot training, Reese AFB, Texas
  • December 1974 – December 1978, T-38 instructor pilot and flight examiner, 64th Flying Training Wing, Reese AFB, Texas
  • January 1979 – July 1982, F-15 instructor pilot and flight examiner, 49th Tactical Fighter Wing, Holloman AFB, New Mexico
  • August 1982 – July 1985, F-5 instructor pilot and flight commander, C Flight, 26th Aggressor Squadron, Clark Air Base, Philippines
  • August 1985 – August 1986, student, College of Naval Command and Staff, Newport, Rhode Island
  • September 1986 – May 1988, chief analyst, Advanced Tactical Fighter, Air Force Center for Studies and Analysis, Headquarters U.S. Air Force, Washington, D.C.
  • June 1988 – March 1990, chief analyst, Commander's Action Group, Tactical Air Command, Langley AFB, Virginia
  • April 1990 – April 1991, operations officer, 7th Fighter Squadron, Holloman AFB, New Mexico
  • May 1991 – July 1992, Commander, 8th Fighter Squadron, Holloman AFB, New Mexico
  • August 1992 – July 1993, student, Army War College, Carlisle Barracks, Pennsylvania
  • August 1993 – July 1995, Deputy Commander, later, Commander, 33rd Operations Group, Eglin AFB, Florida
  • August 1995 – June 1997, Chief, Western Hemisphere Division, Directorate of Strategic Plans and Policy, J-5, the Joint Staff, Washington, D.C.
  • June 1997 – May 1999, Commander, 355th Wing, Davis-Monthan AFB, Arizona
  • June 1999 – September 2000, Director of Studies and Analysis, Headquarters U.S. Air Forces in Europe, Ramstein AB, Germany
  • September 2000 – March 2003, Director of Global Power Programs, Assistant Secretary of the Air Force for Acquisition, Headquarters U.S. Air Force, Washington, D.C.
  • March 2003 – August 2005, Principal Deputy, Assistant Secretary of the Air Force for Acquisition, and Military Director, U.S. Air Force Scientific Advisory Board, Headquarters U.S. Air Force, Washington, D.C.
  • September 2005 – September 2007, Vice Chief of Staff, Headquarters U.S. Air Force, Washington, D.C.
  • October 2007 – September 2009, Commander, Air Combat Command, Langley AFB, Va., and Air Component Commander for U.S. Joint Forces Command

Flight Information[edit]

Awards and decorations[edit]

COMMAND PILOT WINGS.png Command Air Force Pilot Badge
US Army Airborne basic parachutist badge.gif Parachutist Badge
Joint Chiefs of Staff seal.svg Joint Chiefs of Staff Badge
Headquarters US Air Force Badge.png Headquarters Air Force Badge
Air Force Distinguished Service Medal
Defense Superior Service Medal
Width-44 crimson ribbon with a pair of width-2 white stripes on the edges Legion of Merit
Width-44 scarlet ribbon with width-4 ultramarine blue stripe at center, surrounded by width-1 white stripes. Width-1 white stripes are at the edges. Bronze Star Medal
Defense Meritorious Service Medal
Bronze oak leaf cluster
Bronze oak leaf cluster
Bronze oak leaf cluster
Bronze oak leaf cluster
Width-44 crimson ribbon with two width-8 white stripes at distance 4 from the edges.
Meritorious Service Medal with four bronze oak leaf clusters
Bronze oak leaf cluster
Aerial Achievement Medal with bronze oak leaf cluster
Joint Service Commendation Medal
Bronze oak leaf cluster
Bronze oak leaf cluster
Air Force Commendation Medal with two bronze oak leaf clusters
Bronze oak leaf cluster
Joint Meritorious Unit Award with bronze oak leaf cluster
Bronze oak leaf cluster
Bronze oak leaf cluster
Air Force Outstanding Unit Award with two bronze oak leaf clusters
Bronze oak leaf cluster
Air Force Organizational Excellence Award with bronze oak leaf cluster
Combat Readiness Medal
Bronze star
Bronze star
Width=44 scarlet ribbon with a central width-4 golden yellow stripe, flanked by pairs of width-1 scarlet, white, Old Glory blue, and white stripes
National Defense Service Medal with two bronze service stars
Bronze star
Width-44 ribbon with the following stripes, arranged symmetrically from the edges to the center: width-2 black, width-4 chamois, width-2 Old Glory blue, width-2 white, width-2 Old Glory red, width-6 chamouis, width-3 myrtle green up to a central width-2 black stripe
Southwest Asia Service Medal with bronze service star
Bronze star
Kosovo Campaign Medal with bronze service star
Global War on Terrorism Expeditionary Medal
Global War on Terrorism Service Medal
Air Force Overseas Long Tour Service Ribbon
Silver oak leaf cluster
Bronze oak leaf cluster
Bronze oak leaf cluster
Bronze oak leaf cluster
Air Force Longevity Service Award with silver and three bronze oak leaf clusters
Bronze star
Small Arms Expert Marksmanship Ribbon with bronze service star
Air Force Training Ribbon
Gold star
Inter-American Defense Board Medal with gold award star
Kuwait Liberation Medal (Kuwait)

Effective dates of promotion[edit]

Promotions
Insignia Rank Date
US-O10 insignia.svg General November 1, 2005
US-O9 insignia.svg Lieutenant General  May 1, 2003
US-O8 insignia.svg Major General April 1, 2002
US-O7 insignia.svg Brigadier General August 1, 1999
US-O6 insignia.svg Colonel February 1, 1994
US-O5 insignia.svg Lieutenant Colonel September 1, 1989
US-O4 insignia.svg Major May 24, 1986
US-O3 insignia.svg Captain June 6, 1977
US-O2 insignia.svg First Lieutenant June 6, 1975
US-O1 insignia.svg Second Lieutenant June 6, 1973

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  • [1] Official Biography

 This article incorporates public domain material from the United States Government document "http://www.af.mil/bios/bio.asp?bioID=5080".

Military offices
Preceded by
Gen. T. Michael Moseley
Vice Chief of Staff of the United States Air Force
2005 - 2007
Succeeded by
Gen. Duncan J. McNabb
Preceded by
Gen. Ronald Keys
Commander, Air Combat Command
2007 - 2009
Succeeded by
Gen. William M. Fraser III