KDUN

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For the organization known as KDUN (for its German name "Komitee für eine demokratische UNO"), see Committee for a Democratic UN.
KDUN
KDUN-AM logo.png
City of license Reedsport, Oregon
Broadcast area Reedsport, Florence, Coos Bay, Eugene, Roseburg, Grants Pass, Bandon, North Bend
Branding K-dune
Frequency 1030 kHz
First air date June 2, 1961
Format Oldies
Power 50,000 watts (day)
630 watts (night)
Class B
Facility ID 33779
Transmitter coordinates 43°44′17″N 124°04′30″W / 43.73806°N 124.07500°W / 43.73806; -124.07500
Callsign meaning "Dune"
Former callsigns KRAF (1961-1970)[1]
KDUN (1970-1997)
KLLU (1997-2002)[2]
Former frequencies 1470 kHz (1961-1998)
Owner Post Rock Communications, LLC
(Post Rock Communications, LLC)
Sister stations KZFX 93.7 FM Ridgecrest, California
Website [1]

KDUN (1030 AM, "K-dune") is a radio station licensed to serve Reedsport, Oregon, USA. The station, which began broadcasting in June 1961, is currently owned by Post Rock Communications, LLC.

KDUN broadcasts an oldies music format.[3]

History[edit]

Launch as KRAF[edit]

Oregon Coast Broadcasters was granted the initial construction permit by the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) in 1960 for a new daytime-only AM station, assigned call letters KRAF, broadcasting with 5,000 watts of power on a frequency of 1470 kHz.[4] KRAF began regular broadcasting on June 2, 1961, with Walter J. Kraus as the president and owner of Oregon Coast Broadcasters and Gless Connoy as the station's general manager.[5] The KRAF callsign represented the "Reedsport and Florence" coverage area of the station.[6] The station was marketed with the slogan, "Listening is heavenly on 1470".[6]

In 1966, Gless Connoy purchased the station outright from Kraus.[7] Wayne A. Moreland bought KRAF from the Connoy family on July 1, 1968.[8]

Becoming KDUN[edit]

Moreland's ownership of KRAF would prove short-lived as Steve and Jerome Kenagy's Communications Broadcasting, Inc., acquired the station on September 1, 1970.[1] The new owners implemented a "middle of the road" music format and had the FCC change the station's call letters to KDUN.[1] The Kenagy brothers shifted ownership of KDUN in March 1972 to a new company named KDUN Radio, Inc.[9] The brothers maintained the "middle of the road" music format through the rest of the 1970s.[9]

Move to 1030[edit]

In March 1982, the station applied to the FCC for authorization to change their broadcast frequency from 1470 kHz to 1030 kHz, increase daytime signal power to 10,000 watts, and make some technical changes in their antenna system.[10] The FCC finally granted the station a construction permit to make these changes on May 7, 1987.[10] KDUN began broadcasting at the lower frequency and higher power in February 1998 and received their license to cover the upgrades on April 18, 1998.[11]

In April 1982, the Kenagy brothers applied to the FCC to transfer ownership of KDUN Radio, Inc., to their now-larger software company, Custom Business System, Inc. The transfer was approved by the FCC on April 23, 1982.[12] In November 1985, CBSI announced that it was selling KDUN Radio, Inc., to Lyle and Eleanor A. Irons so that it could focus on the traffic and billing business.[13] The deal was approved by the FCC on February 11, 1986, and the transaction was consummated on April 23, 1986.[14]

The KLLU years[edit]

After a quarter-century of continuous corporate ownership, KDUN Radio, Inc., reached an agreement in June 1997 to sell this station to Shae Partners, LLC. The deal was approved by the FCC on August 5, 1997, and the transaction was consummated on September 15, 1997.[15] The station's callsign was changed to KLLU on November 21, 1997.[2]

In July 1999, Shae Partners, LLC, reached an agreement to sell this station to the F & L Broadcast Development Corporation for $200,000.[16] The deal was approved by the FCC on August 24, 1999, and the transaction was consummated on August 29, 1999.[17] Less than two weeks later, in early September 1999, F & L Broadcast Development Corporation reached an agreement to sell this station to Pamplin Communications Corporation subsidiary Pamplin Broadcasting-Oregon, Inc., for $350,000.[18] The deal was approved by the FCC on October 29, 1999, and the transaction was consummated on November 1, 1999.[19]

Back to KDUN[edit]

The station was granted a new construction permit in August 2000, this time to increase the daytime signal to 50,000 watts and the nighttime signal to 630 watts.[20] KLLU began broadcasting at the higher power in March 2001 and the station received its license to cover the changes on June 18, 2001.[21] The station was reassigned its heritage KDUN call letters by the Federal Communications Commission on September 25, 2002.[2]

In January 2006, Pamplin Broadcasting-Oregon, Inc., CEO Robert Boisseau Pamplin Jr. reached an agreement to sell this station to Bill Schweitzer, doing business as WKS Broadcasting, Inc., for a cash price of $220,000.[22][23] The deal was approved by the FCC on June 5, 2006, and the transaction was consummated on August 29, 2006.[24] At the time of the sale, KDUN was broadcasting a country music format.[22]

KDUN went temporarily silent on November 27, 2007, when the station's owners were unable to pay their electricity bill due to "financial problems with its operations".[25] According to their April 2008 filing with the FCC, new owners for KDUN were being sought.[25]

KDUN today[edit]

In May 2008, WKS Broadcasting, Inc., reached an agreement to sell this station to Sand & Sea Broadcasting, LLC.[26] The deal was approved by the FCC on June 23, 2008, and the transaction was consummated on August 6, 2008. On September 1, 2013, KDUN was sold to Post Rock Communications, LLC. The current format is Oldies AC

Former on-air staff[edit]

Delilah Rene, a native of Reedsport, Oregon, and host of a nationally syndicated American radio show featuring song requests and dedications, got her first job in radio at KDUN in the mid-1970s after winning a speech contest.[27][28][29] While still attending junior high school, she reported local news and sports as the host of "Delilah, On the Warpath".[27][28] In 2007, Rene was a finalist for the Radio & Records Industry Achievement Award as Syndicated Personality/Show of the Year.[30]

Traffic and billing software[edit]

In 1975, KDUN's owners were frustrated by the volume of paperwork then required for scheduling advertising, billing advertisers, and producing each day's commercial lineup, they purchased a Wang Laboratories minicomputer and, along with engineer Wes Lockard, invented software to handle these traffic and billing tasks.[31] As the brothers took on these tasks for other stations in the area, they realized that a market for computerized traffic and billing existed and, in 1978, they founded Custom Business Systems, Inc.[31] At its peak in the mid-1990s, CBSI software was in use by roughly one-third of the commercial radio stations in the United States and by broadcasters in 24 other countries.[31] In 1999, it was described as the "world's largest supplier of business software for the radio broadcast industry".[13] CBSI and the Kenagy brothers sold their interest in KDUN in 1985. CBSI itself is now a part of Marketron Broadcast Solutions.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "Directory of AM and FM Radio Stations in the U.S.". Broadcasting Yearbook 1971. Washington, D.C.: Broadcasting Publications, Inc. 1971. p. B-172. 
  2. ^ a b c "Call Sign History". FCC Media Bureau CDBS Public Access Database. 
  3. ^ "Station Information Profile". Arbitron. 
  4. ^ "Directory of AM and FM Radio stations in the U.S.". 1961-1962 Broadcasting Yearbook. Washington, D.C.: Broadcasting Publications, Inc. 1962. p. B-138. 
  5. ^ "Directory of AM and FM Radio stations in the U.S.". 1963 Broadcasting Yearbook. Washington, D.C.: Broadcasting Publications, Inc. 1963. p. B-151. 
  6. ^ a b "Radio KRAF letterhead" (gif). Retrieved April 4, 2009. 
  7. ^ "Directory of AM and FM Radio stations in the U.S.". 1967 Broadcasting Yearbook. Washington, D.C.: Broadcasting Publications, Inc. 1967. p. B-133. 
  8. ^ "The Facilities of Radio". Broadcasting Yearbook 1969. Washington, D.C.: Broadcasting Publications, Inc. 1969. p. B-140. 
  9. ^ a b "Directory of Radio Stations in the United States and Canada". Broadcasting Yearbook 1979. Washington, D.C.: Broadcasting Publications, Inc. 1979. p. C-182. 
  10. ^ a b "Application Search Details (BP-19820305AV)". FCC Media Bureau. May 7, 1987. 
  11. ^ web Application Search Details (BL-19880222AD), FCC Media Bureau, April 18, 1988 
  12. ^ "Application Search Details (BTC-19820402GW)". FCC Media Bureau. April 23, 1982. 
  13. ^ a b Kelly, Clint (Spring 1999). "A Matter of Honor". Response: The Seattle Pacific University Magazine. 
  14. ^ "Application Search Details ()". FCC Media Bureau. April 23, 1986. 
  15. ^ "Application Search Details (BAL-19970620EA)". FCC Media Bureau. September 15, 1997. 
  16. ^ "Changing Hands - 1999-07-26". Broadcasting & Cable. July 26, 1999. 
  17. ^ "Application Search Details (BAL-19990709GH)". FCC Media Bureau. August 29, 1999. 
  18. ^ "Changing Hands - 1999-11-15". Broadcasting & Cable. November 15, 1999. 
  19. ^ "Application Search Details (BAL-19990910GE)". FCC Media Bureau. November 1, 1999. 
  20. ^ "Application Search Details (BP-19991222ABG)". FCC Media Bureau. August 4, 2000. 
  21. ^ "Application Search Details (BL-20010312AAR)". FCC Media Bureau. June 18, 2001. 
  22. ^ a b "Deals - 2006-05-06". Broadcasting & Cable. May 6, 2006. 
  23. ^ Brown, Michael D. (February 2006). "PDX Radio Waves". Water Cooled (Society of Broadcast Engineers - Chapter 124). Back in Oregon, the flooded-and-still-silent remains of KDUN 1030 Reedsport have been sold by Pamplin Broadcasting to WKS Broadcasting of Palo Alto, CA, for $220k. The station ran at 50 kW days, 630 Watts nights, ND 
  24. ^ "Application Search Details (BAL-20060123AEY)". FCC Media Bureau. August 29, 2006. 
  25. ^ a b "Notification of Suspension of Operations / Request for Silent STA (BLSTA-20080414AAB)". Federal Communications Commission. April 11, 2008. 
  26. ^ "Deals - 2008-05-24". Broadcasting & Cable. May 24, 2008. 
  27. ^ a b Bearden, Michelle (October 8, 2006). "Smooth Radio; The Voice, Musings of Delilah Are Perfect Relaxer for Her Legion of Fans". Winston-Salem Journal. By her pre-teens, she had parlayed that gift into a show called 'Delilah, On the Warpath', reporting news and sports on KDUN-AM, a small station in her hometown of Reedsport, Ore. 
  28. ^ a b "Delilah". Premiere Radio Networks. Retrieved April 4, 2009. 
  29. ^ Henry, Chris (February 28, 2008). "Yes, That Delilah Lives in South Kitsap". Kitsap Sun. She got her start in radio in junior high, thanks to a speech contest judged by two guys who owned the station in Reedsport. Delilah, then Delilah Luke, reported on school sports and news for "KSUN 1470, the voice of the Oregon dunes, 5000 watts of crystal clear air power!" 
  30. ^ "2007 Industry Achievement Awards". Radio and Records. September 28, 2007. 
  31. ^ a b c Kidd, Joe (May 3, 1995). "Oregon Software Firm Revolutionizes Talk-Radio Scheduling, Billing". Eugene Register-Guard. 

External links[edit]