Kevin Cahoon

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Kevin Cahoon is an American actor/singer/songwriter, born in Houston, Texas.

Child performer[edit]

Cahoon began his performing career at the age of 5 as 'The World's Youngest Rodeo Clown', performing throughout the Texas and Oklahoma Rodeo Circuits, including many consecutive seasons at The Houston Livestock Show and Rodeo at Houston's Astrodome and The Texas State High School Finals Rodeo, resulting in a Letter of Citation from then Texas Governor Bill Clements.

At 10, Cahoon began his acting career in his hometown of Houston, performing at such theaters as: Theatre Under the Stars, Stages, The Main Street Theatre, and The Houston Grand Opera. Notable productions include: the Anthony Newley/Leslie Bricusse musical "Chaplin", "Mame" opposite Marilyn Maye, and the controversial production of Charles Durang's "Sister Mary Ignatius Explains It All For You" at the then Tower Theatre.

Cahoon apprenticed with TUTS' Humphrey's School of Musical Theatre, appeared in numerous commercials, and performed at the opening ceremonies of Houston's Wortham Center for the Performing Arts.

He is featured in the book, "Theatre Under the Stars: Stars In Your Eyes"

At 13, Cahoon won The Teen Male Vocalist Grand Championship on television's 'Star Search'. And went on to tour that summer in "The Stars of Star Search"

Education[edit]

Cahoon majored in Acting at Houston's High School For The Performing and Visual Arts. He then went on to receive a BFA from New York University's Tisch School of the Arts at Circle In The Square.

Theatre[edit]

After graduation Cahoon made his Broadway debut in The Who's Tommy. On Broadway he has created the roles of Ed the Hyena in The Lion King directed by Julie Taymor, George in The Wedding Singer, The Childcatcher in Chitty Chitty Bang Bang, as well as the revival of The Rocky Horror Show.

He left his role in The Lion King to perform the 8th show of the week for John Cameron Mitchell in the title role of Hedwig in Hedwig and The Angry Inch at The Jane Street Theater Off-Broadway, eventually taking over the role and starring as 'Hedwig' in Boston, The Edinburgh Festival in Scotland, and an extended eight month run at The Victoria Theatre in San Francisco. Kevin is also featured in the documentary film Whether You Like It Or Not: The True Story of Hedwig.

Off-Broadway, Kevin originated the role of Phil D'Armano in Andrew Lippa's The Wild Party at The Manhattan Theatre Club. He also starred opposite Matthew Broderick in the Roundabout Theatre Company's revival of 'The Foreigner' for which he received a Lucille Lortel Award nomination for Outstanding Featured Actor. Other off-Broadway credits include The Shaggs: Philosophy of the World at Playwright's Horizon and the revival of Paula Vogel's "How I Learned to Drive" at Second Stage.

For New York's City Center Encores! Series,he was seen as Woof in Hair and Peter in Babes in Arms and has performed regionally at The Berkshire Theatre Festival, NY Stage and Film, The Guthrie Theatre, and The Williamstown Theatre Festival. Other productions include the role of Hans Christian Andersen in the American premiere of Stephen Schwartz's My Fairytale for California's PCPA, "The Imaginary Invalid" at Bard Summerscape alongside Peter Dinklage, "Minsky's" at L.A.'s Ahmanson Theatre, and the all-male production of "A Funny Thing Happened On The Way To The Forum" directed by Jessica Stone.

Kevin is featured in the Original Cast Recordings of: "The Lion King", "The Rocky Horror Show", "The Wild Party", "Babes In Arms", "The Wedding Singer", and the soon to be released, "The Shaggs: Philosophy Of The World".

He also appeared on the 1998, 2000, and 2006 Tony Awards.

Television and Film[edit]

On television Kevin has portrayed Ross Rothman on Six Degrees (ABC) and Kermit Jones on The Royale (AMC). He has also guest starred on The Mentalist (CBS), CSI (CBS), Modern Family (ABC), Franklin and Bash (TNT), NCIS (CBS), Canterbury's Law (FOX), Hope and Faith (ABC), Ed (NBC), Law and Order (NBC) and Law and Order: Criminal Intent (NBC). On film he can be seen in Disney's Mars Needs Moms, Woody Allen's The Curse of the Jade Scorpion, Paul Reiser's The Thing About My Folks, Adrienne Shelley's Sudden Manhattan, Michael Knowle's One Night, and W.E. directed by Madonna. He also was featured in the Woody Allen short, Sounds From A Town I Love, which was created for VH-1's "The Concert for NYC" after September 11, 2001.

Directing[edit]

As a director Kevin has directed the productions of Seussical, Hairspray, Grease, and Annie for The Bay Area Houston Ballet and Theatre. For his work at BAHBT, Cahoon received the Jete Society Honor in 2011. Cahoon directed the premiere production of Grifftopia starring and created by Griffin Newman and the debut productions of Tastiskank, created by Kate Reinders and Sarah Litzsinger, which went on to win the Aspen Comedy Festival, both for the Ars Nova Theatre in NYC.

Music[edit]

With his New York-based band Kevin Cahoon and Ghetto Cowboy, Cahoon has played packed shows at many New York venues including CBGB's, Don Hill's, Ars Nova, Joe's Pub, and Irving Plaza. He has shared the bill with such artists as Tom Waits, Elvis Costello, and Justin Bond. Cahoon is also featured in the documentary film 'Squeezebox' about NYC's downtown music scene.  Kevin Cahoon and Ghetto Cowboy's debut album Doll received The Out Music Award for Outstanding Debut Recording, received a Citation of Merit from Billboard Magazine's World Songwriters Awards, received the Pabst Blue Ribbon Live & Local Award for New York City, and its title song is the lead track for the feature film Ready, OK!. Kevin Cahoon and Ghetto Cowboy are a constant presence on Sirius Radio's OutQ, charting in the top 10, and on LOGO's NewNowNext.

Press[edit]

Cahoon has been both profiled and mentioned in media sources across the world. Notable media outlets include: The New York Times, Time Out New York, Paper Magazine, Gotham Magazine's 'It List', San Francisco Chronicle, The Houston Chronicle, and The Scotsman in Edinburgh.

References[edit]

External links[edit]