Khalden training camp

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

The Khalden training camp (also transliterated as khaldan) was one of the hundreds of al-Qaeda training camps in Afghanistan. They were established and run by members of al-Qaeda during the Taliban rule (1996–2001).[1] Having attended one of these camps has triggered suspicion on many of the detainees in the War on Terror. The Khalden training camp was led by Ibn al-Shaykh al-Libi, who was captured in late 2001.[2]

Ahmed Ressam, the Millennium Bomber, said he attended the camp using the alias "Nabil", beginning in April 1998 for five to six months.[3][4] He said Khalden Camp then generally hosted 50–100 trainees at any time, and he trained there in light weapons, handguns, small machine guns, rocket-propelled grenade launchers (RPGs), explosives (including TNT, C4 plastic explosives, and black plastic explosives), poisons (including cyanide), poison gas, sabotage, target selection, urban warfare, tactics (including assassinations), and security.[3][4][5] Trainees were from Jordan, Algeria, Yemen, Saudi Arabia, Chechnya, Turkey, Sweden, Germany, and France.[3] During the time he was there, he met Zacarias Moussaoui.[4][5]

During the early years of the War in Afghanistan, the Bush administration described the Khalden Camp as an al-Qaeda training facility, an assertion used as evidence of an alleged connection to al-Qaeda for Abu Zubaydah and more than 50 other men held as enemy combatants at the Guantanamo Bay detention camp.[6] Since 2006, however, this allegation has been contested by the 9/11 Commission Report, Brynjar Lia, head of the international terrorism and global jihadism at the Norwegian Defence Research Establishment; and unclassified records from the detainees' tribunal reviews (CSRT)s at Guantanamo.[6][7][8][9][10]

Zubaydah testified in his Combatant Status Review Tribunal (CSRT) that the Khalden Camp was at such odds with al-Qaeda and bin Laden that it was closed by the Taliban in 2001, at al-Qaeda's request.[6] This account was corroborated by two other detainees, Noor Uthman Muhammed, alleged by the U.S. Government to have been the emir, or leader, of the Khalden Camp; and Khalid Sulayman Jaydh Al Hubayshi, a close friend of Zubaydah.[7][8] In addition, Muhamed's charge sheet refers to the closing of the Khalden camp at the request of terrorist leaders.[11]

Brynjar Lia wrote in his 2008 book that an ideological conflict, between the leaders of the Khalden Camp and the Taliban and al-Qaeda, led to the closing of the Khalden Camp.[10] Zubaydah, Khalid Sulayman Jaydh Al Hubayshi, and Noor Uthman Muhammed confirmed this divide in their CSRT testimony.[6][7][8] Of the 57 detainees the U.S. Government claims are associated with the Khalden Camp, 27 have been released, including Zubaydah's friend Al Hubayshi.[12]


Individuals alleged to have attended the Khalden training camp[edit]

Abdullah Khadr[13]
  • Says he only attended two weeks, when he was 13 years old
Abdurahman Khadr[14][15]
  • Attended when he was 11 years old, says there was "a lot of mental training".[16]
Ahmed Ajaj[17]
Ahmed Ressam[18]
  • LAX "millennium bomber". Admitted attending the camp beginning in April 1998 for five to six months, and says that he met Zacarias Moussaoui there.
Feroz Abbasi[19]
  • released in the UK
Gouled Hassan Dourad[20]
Ibrahim Elgabrowny[17]
Mahmoud Abouhalima[17]
  • participated in 1993 World Trade Center bombing
Majed Moqed[21]
  • 9-11 hijacker
Mohamed Rashid al-Owhali[19][22]
  • attended in 1997
  • participated in the bombings of US embassies in Africa
Mokhtar Belmokhtar[23]
  • Algerian terrorist, kidnapper, smuggler, and weapons dealer sentenced to death in absentia in his home country twice
  • Now heads the Al-Mulatahemeen ("Masked") Brigade (also known as the al-Mua'qi'oon Biddam ("Those who Sign with Blood") Brigade), which took hundreds of people hostage in the In Aménas hostage crisis in January 2013
Mushabib al-Hamlan[24][25]
  • Friend of the 9-11 hijackers.
  • Trained with 9-11 hijackers.
Omar al-Faruq[19]
  • trained in the early 1990s
  • a southeast Asian lieutenant
Rafiq Bin Bashir Bin Jalud Al Hami[26]
Ramzi Yousef[17]
  • participated in 1993 World Trade Center bombing
Richard Reid[19]
  • shoe bomber
Saajid Badat[19]
  • tried to be a shoe bomber
Satam al-Suqami[27]
  • 9-11 hijacker
Zacarias Moussaoui[28]
Mohammed Abd Al Al Qadir[29]
Khalid Sulaymanjaydh Al Habayshi[30]
Noor Uthman Muhammaed[31]
Riyad Bil Mohammed Tahir Nasseri[32]
Abdullah Ali Al Utaybi[33]
  • One of the allegations against Abdullah Ali Al Utaybi was: "Detainee may have trained at the al Qaida Khaldan Camp [sic]."
Ridah Bin Saleh Al Yazidi[34]
  • One of the factors favoring Ridah Bin Saleh Al Yazidi's continued detention was: "The detainee said he was provided with a letter of introduction for admission to the Khalden Training Camp. The detainee traveled to Afghanistan using a forged passport. The detainee traveled to Khost, Afghanistan via Switzerland, Islamabad, Pakistan and Jalalabad, Afghanistan."
Hisham Sliti[35]
Ahmed Hassan Jamil Suleyman[36]
  • One of the factors favoring Ahmed Hassan Jamil Suleyman's continued detention was: "The detainee was at Khalden Camp between May 1994 and 1999."
Riyad Bil Mohammed Tahir Nasseri[32]
Abdul Bin Mohammed Bin Abess Ourgy[37]
  • One of the factors considered for his continued detention was: "Detainee denies that he trained at the Khalden training camp."
Umar Abdullah Al Kunduzi[38]
  • One of the factors favoring the continued detention of Umar Abdullah Al Kunduzi was: "The detainee and others were led out of the Tora Bora region by the leader of the Khalden training camp, who has been linked to Usama Bin Laden, Abu Zubaydah and several other major al Qaida leaders."
Omar Nasiri[39][40]
Idris Ahmed Abdu Qader Idris[41]
  • One of the allegations against Idris Ahmed Abdu Qader Idris was: "The detainee ###############, voluntarily traveled from Italy to Afghanistan in May 1999 to attend the Khaldan training camp."
Abdul Rahman Mohamed Saleh Naser[42]
Lufti Bin Ali[43]
  • One of the factors favoring Lufti Bin Ali's continued detention was: "The detainee was identified by a senior al Qaida lieutenant as having studied at the Khaldan camp in 1998 or 1999."
Faiz Mohammed Ahmed Al Kandari[44][45]
  • One of the allegations against Faiz Mohammed Ahmed Al Kandari was: "The detainee later traveled into Afghanistan and received weapons training at the Khaldan training camp. Usama Bin Laden personally provided religious instruction and trainee [sic] at this camp."
  • One of the factors favoring Faiz Mohammed Ahmed Al Kandari's continued detention was: "The detainee traveled to the Khalden training camp in Afghanistan where he received weapons training on the Kalashnikov, Dusaka (AKA Docka), Grinov, BKC automatic rifles, and RPG’s, and anti-aircraft guns. Usama Bin Laden provided religious instruction and gave advice and encouragement to the Jihadists."
Adil Charkaoui[46]
Raouf Hannachi[46]
  • Made the travel arrangements for Ahmed Ressam, the "millennium bomber", to receive training at the "Khaldun training camp".
  • Alleged to have received military training in Afghanistan himself.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Son of Al Qaeda, Frontline (PBS)
  2. ^ The Terrorist Within, The Seattle Times
  3. ^ a b c "U.S. v. Haquari, Examination". USDC SDNY. July 3, 2001. Retrieved February 27, 2010. 
  4. ^ a b c U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit (February 2, 2010). "U.S. v. Ressam". Retrieved February 27, 2010. 
  5. ^ a b "Ressam Testimony in Mokhtar Haouari Trial". Southern District of New York. July 2001. Retrieved February 27, 2010. 
  6. ^ a b c d "Abu Zubaydah Unclassified Verbatim Combatant Status Review Tribunal Transcript". Department of Defense. 2007. 
  7. ^ a b c Khalid Sulaymanjaydh Al Hubayshi Unclassified Verbatim Combatant Status Review Tribunal Transcript, pp. 65–73, Department of Defense[dead link]
  8. ^ a b c Noor Uthamn Muhammed Unclassified Verbatim Combatant Status Review Tribunal, p. 15, Department of Defense
  9. ^ 9/11 Commission Report: Final Report of the National Commission on Terrorist Attacks Upon the United States, 22 July 2006
  10. ^ a b Brynjar Lia, Architect of Global Jihad: The Life of Al-Qaida Strategist Abu Mus'ab al-Suri pg. 242–243, Columbia University Press, 2008
  11. ^ "Noor Uthamn Muhammed Charge Sheets", Department of Defense Website
  12. ^ "New York Times Guantanamo Docket". Projects.nytimes.com. Retrieved 2012-04-04. 
  13. ^ 'I was never in al-Qaeda,' newly freed Khadr says: Released after 14 months in Pakistani jails, he calls himself an aspiring businessman[dead link], Globe and Mail, December 9, 2005
  14. ^ Khadr clears Charkaoui, casts doubt on case, press release from Justice for Mohamed Harkat, July 14, 2004
  15. ^ Ordinary lad — or jihad conscript? mirrored Toronto Star, December 2, 2003
  16. ^ Testimony of Abdurahman Khadr as a witness in the trial against Charkaoui, July 13, 2004
  17. ^ a b c d Another Angle on al-Zawahiri's Call to Action, Stratfor, December 21, 2005
  18. ^ Going to Camp, Seattle Times, July 7, 2002
  19. ^ a b c d e The Khaldan Alumni (.pdf)[dead link], Toronto Star, December 9, 2005
  20. ^ "Biographies of High Value Terrorist Detainees Transferred to the US Naval Base at Guantanamo Bay" (PDF) (Press release). Office of the Director of National Intelligence. September 6, 2006. Retrieved December 16, 2006. 
  21. ^ National Commission on Terrorist Attacks Upon the United States – notes to chapter 7, 9/11 Commission
  22. ^ Hijacking suspect 'was bin Laden bodyguard', The Guardian, September 30, 2001
  23. ^ Jacinto, Leela (27 September 2010). "Key figures in al Qaeda's North African branch". CIMIC. Retrieved 21 January 2013. 
  24. ^ World Trade Center and Pentagon Attacks, Global Security
  25. ^ 911 Commission: Notes to Chapter 7, 911 Commission
  26. ^ Summarized transcript (.pdf), from Rafiq Bin Bashir Bin Jalud Al Hami's Administrative Review Board hearing – page 151
  27. ^ National Commission on Terrorist Attacks Upon the United States – notes to chapter 7, 911 commission
  28. ^ Indictment of ZACARIAS MOUSSAOUI, US Department of Justice
  29. ^ Factors for and against the continued detention (.pdf) of Mohammed Abd Al Al Qadir Administrative Review Board – page 18
  30. ^ Summarized transcripts (.pdf) from Khalid Sulaymanjaydh Al Habayshi Combatant Status Review Tribunal – pages 65–70
  31. ^ Summary of Evidence memo (.pdf) prepared for Noor Uthman Muhammaed's Combatant Status Review Tribunal – October 19, 2004 page 264
  32. ^ a b Summary of Evidence memo (.pdf) prepared for Riyad Bil Mohammed Tahir Nasseri's Combatant Status Review Tribunal – October 21, 2004 page 148
  33. ^ Summary of Evidence memo (.pdf) prepared for Abdullah Ali Al Utaybi's Combatant Status Review Tribunal – September 28, 2004 page 237
  34. ^ Factors for and against the continued detention (.pdf) of Ridah Bin Saleh Al Yazidi Administrative Review Board, May 4, 2005 – page 51
  35. ^ Summary of Evidence (.pdf) prepared for Hisham Sliti's Combatant Status Review Tribunals – November 19, 2004 – page 62
  36. ^ Factors for and against the continued detention (.pdf) of Ahmed Hassan Jamil Suleyman Administrative Review Board – page 45
  37. ^ Factors for and against the continued detention (.pdf) of Abdul Bin Mohammed Bin Abess Ourgy Administrative Review Board, May 2, 2005 – page 48
  38. ^ Factors for and against the continued detention (.pdf) of Umar Abdullah Al Kunduzi Administrative Review Board – pages 59–61
  39. ^ Reid Morden, Running with, and from, al-Qaeda, The Globe and Mail, November 25, 2006
  40. ^ Infiltrating Al-Qaeda: At a terrorist camp, a French spy meets the battling Khadr brothers[dead link], Macleans (magazine), November 27, 2006
  41. ^ Summary of Evidence memo (.pdf) prepared for Idris Ahmed Abdu Qader Idris's Combatant Status Review Tribunal – September 30, 2004 page 246
  42. ^ Factors for and against the continued detention (.pdf) of Abdul Rahman Mohamed Saleh Naser Administrative Review Board May 18, 2005 – page 35
  43. ^ Factors for and against the continued detention (.pdf) of Lufti Bin Ali Administrative Review Board – page 19
  44. ^ documents (.pdf) from Faiz Mohammed Ahmed Al Kandari's Combatant Status Review Tribunal
  45. ^ Factors for and against the continued detention (.pdf) of Faiz Mohammed Ahmed Al Kandari Administrative Review Board – page 31
  46. ^ a b Dozens of Canadians join Jihad terror camps Immigrants recruited, RCMP says, Justice for Mohamed Harkat