List of Arkansas Razorbacks head football coaches

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Coach Petrino in a red Arkansas jacket and hat on the field with a player at rear.
Former head coach Bobby Petrino

The Arkansas Razorbacks college football team represents the University of Arkansas in the West Division of the Southeastern Conference (SEC). The Razorbacks compete as part of the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division I Football Bowl Subdivision. The program has had 30 head coaches, and 2 interim head coaches, since it began play during the 1894 season.[1] Since December 2012, Bret Bielema has served as head coach of the Razorbacks.[2]

The team has played more than 1,160 games over 117 seasons.[1] In that time, eleven coaches have led the Razorbacks in postseason bowl games: Fred Thomsen, John Barnhill, Bowden Wyatt, Frank Broyles, Lou Holtz, Ken Hatfield, Jack Crowe, Danny Ford, Houston Nutt, Reggie Herring and Bobby Petrino.[3] Five coaches won conference championships: Thomsen, Wyatt, Broyles, Holtz and Hatfield won a combined ten as a member of the Southwest Conference.[1] Frank Broyles won the Razorbacks' lone national championship in 1964.[1][4]

Broyles is the leader in seasons coached and games won, with 144 victories during his 19 years with the program.[1] Hatfield has the highest winning percentage of those who have coached more than one game, with .760.[1] John Tomlin has the lowest winning percentage of those who have coached more than one game, with .222.[1] Of the 31 different head coaches who have led the Razorbacks, Hugo Bezdek,[5] Francis Schmidt,[6] Wyatt,[7] Broyles,[8] and Holtz[9] have been inducted as head coaches into the College Football Hall of Fame in South Bend, Indiana.

Key[edit]

Key to symbols in coaches list
General Overall Conference Postseason[A 1]
# Order of coaches[A 2] GC Games coached CW Conference wins PW Postseason wins
DC Division championships OW Overall wins CL Conference losses PL Postseason losses
CC Conference championships OL Overall losses CT Conference ties PT Postseason ties
NC National championships OT Overall ties[A 3] C% Conference winning percentage
dagger Elected to the College Football Hall of Fame O% Overall winning percentage[A 4]


Coaches[edit]

List of head football coaches showing season(s) coached, overall records, conference records, postseason records, championships and selected awards[A 5]
# Name Season(s) GC OW OL OT O% CW CL CT C% PW PL PT DC
[A 6]
CC NC Awards
1 Futrall, John C.John C. Futrall 1894–1896 7 5 2 0 .714 0
2 Wilson, B. N.B. N. Wilson 1897–1898 6 4 1 1 .750 0
3 Searles, ColbertColbert Searles 1899–1900 9 5 2 2 .667 0
4 Thomas, CharlesCharles Thomas 1901–1902 17 9 8 0 .529 0
5 McDaniel, D. A.D. A. McDaniel 1903 7 3 4 0 .429 0
6 Brown, A. D.A. D. Brown 1904–1905 17 6 11 0 .353 0
7 Longman, FrankFrank Longman 1906–1907 17 6 8 3 .441 0
8 Bezdek, HugoHugo Bezdekdagger 1908–1912 43 29 13 1 .686 0
9 Pickering, E. T.E. T. Pickering 1913–1914 18 10 8 0 .556 0
10 McConnell, T. T.T. T. McConnell 1915–1916 15 8 6 1 .567 1 3 0 .250 0 0 0 0 0
11 Paine, Norman C.Norman C. Paine 1917–1918 12 8 3 1 .708 0 2 1 .167 0 0 0 0 0
12 Craig, James B.James B. Craig 1919 7 3 4 0 .429 1 2 0 .333 0 0 0 0 0
13 McLaren, GeorgeGeorge McLarendagger 1920–1921 16 8 5 3 .594 4 1 1 .750 0 0 0 0 0
14 Schmidt, FrancisFrancis Schmidtdagger 1922–1928 65 41 21 3 .654 14 13 2 .518 0 0 0 0 0
15 Thomsen, FredFred Thomsen 1929–1941 127 56 61 10 .480 26 42 3 .387 0 0 1 2 0
16 Cole, GeorgeGeorge Cole 1942 10 3 7 0 .300 0 6 0 .000 0 0 0 0 0
17 Tomlin, JohnJohn Tomlin 1943 9 2 7 0 .222 1 4 0 .200 0 0 0 0 0
18 Rose, GlenGlen Rose 1944–1945 21 8 12 1 .405 3 7 1 .318 0 0 0 0 0
19 Barnhill, JohnJohn Barnhill 1946–1949 42 22 17 3 .560 10 13 1 .438 1 0 1 1 0
20 Douglas, OtisOtis Douglas 1950–1952 30 9 21 0 .300 4 14 0 .222 0 0 0 0 0
21 Wyatt, BowdenBowden Wyattdagger 1953–1954 21 11 10 0 .524 7 5 0 .583 0 1 0 1 0
22 Mitchell, JackJack Mitchell 1955–1957 30 17 12 1 .583 8 9 1 .472 0 0 0 0 0
23 Broyles, FrankFrank Broylesdagger 1958–1976 207 144 58 5 .708 91 36 5 .708 4 6 0 7 1 – 1964 AFCA Coach of the Year (1964)[14]
24 Holtz, LouLou Holtzdagger 1977–1983 83 60 21 2 .735 37 18 1 .670 3 2 1 1 0 College Football Coach of the Year (1977)[15]
FWAA Coach of the Year (1977)[16]
Sporting News College Football Coach of the Year (1977)[17]
Walter Camp Coach of the Year Award (1977)[18]
25 Hatfield, KenKen Hatfield 1984–1989 73 55 17 1 .760 36 10 0 .783 1 5 0 2 0
26 Crowe, JackJack Crowe
[A 7]
1990–1992 24 9 15 0 .375 6 10 0 .375 0 1 0 0 0 0
Int Kines, JoeJoe Kines
[A 7]
1992 10 3 6 1 .350 3 4 1 .438 0 0 0 0 0 0
27 Ford, DannyDanny Ford 1993–1997 57 26 30 1 .465 16 23 1 .413 0 1 0 0 0 0
28 Nutt, HoustonHouston Nutt
[A 8]
1998–2007 123 75 48 .610 42 38 .525 2 5 3 0 0 AP SEC Coach of the Year (2001, 2006)[24]
SEC Coach of the Year (2001, 2006)[24]
Int Herring, ReggieReggie Herring
[A 8]
2007 1 0 1 .000 0 0 .000 0 1 0 0 0
29 Petrino, BobbyBobby Petrino 2008–2011 51 34 17 .667 17 15 .531 2 1 0 0 0
30 Smith, John L.John L. Smith 2012 12 4 8 .333 2 6 .250 0 0 0 0 0
31 Bielema, BretBret Bielema 2013–present 12 3 9 .250 0 8 .000 0 0 0 0

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Although the first Rose Bowl Game was played in 1902, it has been continuously played since the 1916 game, and is recognized as the oldest bowl game by the NCAA. "—" indicates any season prior to 1916 when postseason games were not played.[10]
  2. ^ A running total of the number of head coaches, with coaches who served separate tenures being counted only once. Interim head coaches are represented with "Int" and are not counted in the running total. "—" indicates the team played but either without a coach or no coach is on record. "X" indicates an interim year without play.
  3. ^ Overtime rules in college football were introduced in 1996, making ties impossible in the period since.[11]
  4. ^ When computing the win–loss percentage, a tie counts as half a win and half a loss.[12]
  5. ^ Statistics correct as of the end of the 2011–12 college football season.
  6. ^ Divisional champions have advanced to the SEC Championship Game since the institution of divisional play beginning in the 1992 season. Since that time, Arkansas has competed as a member of the SEC West.[13]
  7. ^ a b Jack Crowe resigned as head coach on September 6, 1992, following a 10–3 loss to The Citadel. Joe Kines served as interim head coach for the remainder of the season, finishing with three wins, six losses and one tie.[19][20]
  8. ^ a b Houston Nutt resigned as head coach on November 26, 2007. Reggie Herring served as interim head coach for the 2008 Cotton Bowl Classic loss against Missouri.[21][22][23]

References[edit]

General

Specific

  1. ^ a b c d e f g 2011 Razorback Football Media Guide, pp. 169–170
  2. ^ "Bret Bielema takes Arkansas job". ESPN.com. ESPN.com news services. December 4, 2012. Retrieved December 4, 2012. 
  3. ^ 2011 Razorback Football Media Guide, pp. 171–182
  4. ^ National Collegiate Athletic Association (2010). 2010 NCAA Division I Football Bowl Subdivision Records (PDF). Indianapolis, Indiana: NCAA.org. pp. 68–77. Retrieved July 31, 2011. 
  5. ^ "Hall of Famers: Hugo Bezdek". National Football Foundation's College Football Hall of Fame. Retrieved July 31, 2011. 
  6. ^ "Hall of Famers: Francis Schmidt". National Football Foundation's College Football Hall of Fame. Retrieved July 31, 2011. 
  7. ^ "Hall of Famers: Bowden Wyatt". National Football Foundation's College Football Hall of Fame. Retrieved July 31, 2011. 
  8. ^ "Hall of Famers: Frank Broyles". National Football Foundation's College Football Hall of Fame. Retrieved July 31, 2011. 
  9. ^ "Hall of Famers: Lou Holtz". National Football Foundation's College Football Hall of Fame. Retrieved July 31, 2011. 
  10. ^ National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) (2011). Bowl/All-Star Game Records (PDF). Indianapolis, Indiana: NCAA. pp. 5–10. Archived from the original on August 22, 2011. Retrieved August 21, 2011. 
  11. ^ Whiteside, Kelly (August 25, 2006). "Overtime system still excites coaches". USA Today (McLean, Virginia). Archived from the original on November 24, 2009. Retrieved September 25, 2009. 
  12. ^ Finder, Chuck (September 6, 1987). "Big plays help Paterno to 200th". The New York Times (New York City). Archived from the original on October 22, 2009. Retrieved October 22, 2009. 
  13. ^ Harwell, Hoyt (November 20, 1990). "SEC sets division lineups". The Tuscaloosa News. p. 1C. Retrieved July 31, 2011. 
  14. ^ "Past National COTY Winners". American Football Coaches Association. Retrieved August 26, 2011. 
  15. ^ "Beier named Ohio's best grid coach". The Toledo Blade. February 27, 1978. Retrieved August 26, 2011. 
  16. ^ "Holtz tops Akers in coach voting". Pittsburgh Press. United Press International. January 22, 1978. Retrieved August 26, 2011. 
  17. ^ "Sporting News cites Lou Holtz". The Youngstown Daily Vindicator. Associated Press. January 10, 1978. Retrieved August 26, 2011. 
  18. ^ "Past Winners". Walter Camp Foundation. Retrieved August 26, 2011. 
  19. ^ "Kines will replace Crowe at Arkansas". The Gadsden Times. Associated Press. September 7, 1992. p. B1. Retrieved July 31, 2011. 
  20. ^ "Ford takes coaching job at Arkansas". The Free Lance–Star. Associated Press. December 1, 1992. p. B3. Retrieved July 31, 2011. 
  21. ^ "Nutt turns down offer to remain Razorbacks coach". ESPN.com. ESPN.com news services. November 27, 2007. Retrieved July 31, 2011. 
  22. ^ "Herring will coach Razorbacks in Cotton Bowl". ESPN.com. Associated Press. December 12, 2007. Retrieved July 31, 2011. 
  23. ^ "Temple powers Missouri's Cotton Bowl rout of Arkansas". ESPN.com. Associated Press. January 1, 2008. Retrieved September 12, 2011. 
  24. ^ a b Ole Miss Media Relations. "Houston Nutt named FCA Coach Of The Year". Northeast Mississippi Daily Journal. Retrieved August 26, 2011.