Lodi, California

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City of Lodi
City
Lodi Arch
Lodi Arch
Motto: "Livable, Lovable, Lodi"[1]
Location in San Joaquin County and the state of California
Location in San Joaquin County and the state of California
Coordinates: 38°7′44″N 121°16′51″W / 38.12889°N 121.28083°W / 38.12889; -121.28083Coordinates: 38°7′44″N 121°16′51″W / 38.12889°N 121.28083°W / 38.12889; -121.28083
Country United States
State California
County San Joaquin
Incorporated December 6, 1906[2]
Government
 • Type Council-Manager
 • Mayor Phil Katzakian[3]
 • State Senate Cathleen Galgiani (D)[4]
 • Assembly Jim Cooper (D)[4]
 • U. S. Congress Jerry McNerney (D)[5]
Area[6]
 • Total 13.825 sq mi (35.805 km2)
 • Land 13.611 sq mi (35.252 km2)
 • Water 0.214 sq mi (0.553 km2)  1.54%
Elevation[7] 49 ft (15 m)
Population (2010)
 • Total 62,134
 • Estimate (2011) 62,473
 • Density 4,500/sq mi (1,700/km2)
Time zone PST (UTC-8)
 • Summer (DST) PDT (UTC-7)
ZIP codes 95240–95242
Area code 209
FIPS code 06-42202
GNIS feature ID 0277608
Website www.lodi.gov

Lodi /ˈld./ LOHD-eye is a city located in San Joaquin County, California, in the northern portion of California's Central Valley. The population was 62,134 at the 2010 census. As of January 1, 2011, the California Department of Finance's population estimate is at 62,473.

Lodi is best known for being a center of wine production (the "Zinfandel Capital of the World"),[8] although its vintages have traditionally been less prestigious than those of Sonoma and Napa counties. However, in recent years, the Lodi Appellation has become increasingly respected for its Zinfandel wine and other eclectic varietals.[9] National recognition came from the Creedence Clearwater Revival song "Lodi." Nearby Woodbridge is the home of the well known winery, Woodbridge by Robert Mondavi. Mondavi grew up in Lodi, and Mondavi Winery is considered[by whom?] one of the most influential in the American wine industry.

Lodi gained international attention in 2005 when local residents Hamid and Umer Hayat were arrested and charged in the first terrorism trial in the state of California.

History[edit]

When a group of local families decided to establish a school in 1859, they settled on a site near present-day Cherokee Lane and Turner Road. In 1869, the Central Pacific Railroad was in the process of creating a new route, and pioneer settlers Ezekiel Lawrence, Reuben Wardrobe, A.C. Ayers and John Magley offered a townsite of 160 acres (0.65 km2) to the railroad as an incentive to build a station there. The railroad received a "railroad reserve" of 12 acres (49,000 m2) in the middle of town, and surveyors began laying out streets in the area between Washington to Church and Locust to Walnut. Settlers flocked from nearby Woodbridge, Liberty City, and Galt, including town founders John M. Burt and Dan Crist.[10]

Initially called Mokelumne and Mokelumne Station after the nearby river, confusion with other nearby towns prompted a name change, which was officially endorsed in Sacramento by an assembly bill. Several stories have been offered as to the origins of the town's new name. One refers to a locally stabled trotting horse that had set a four mile (6 km) record, but as the horse reached the peak of its fame in 1869, it is unlikely that the notoriety would have still been evident in 1873. Alternatively, Lodi is a city in northern Italy where Napoleon defeated the Austrians in 1796 and won his first military victory. More than likely, some of the earliest settler families were from Lodi, Illinois[disambiguation needed], and they chose to use the same name as their hometown.[11]

In 1906, the city was officially incorporated by voters, passing 2 to 1. The fire department was established in 1911, and the city purchased the Bay City Gas and Water Works in 1919. Additional public buildings constructed during this period include the Lodi Opera House in 1905, a Carnegie library in 1909, and a hospital in 1915.[12]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1910 2,697
1920 4,850 79.8%
1930 6,788 40.0%
1940 11,079 63.2%
1950 13,798 24.5%
1960 22,229 61.1%
1970 28,691 29.1%
1980 35,221 22.8%
1990 51,874 47.3%
2000 56,999 9.9%
2010 62,134 9.0%
Est. 2013 63,338 [13] 1.9%
State Census data [3]

2010[edit]

The 2010 United States Census[14] reported that Lodi had a population of 62,134. The population density was 4,494.5 people per square mile (1,735.3/km²). The racial makeup of Lodi was 44,715 (71.9%) White, 517 (0.8%) African American, 560 (0.9%) Native American, 4,293 (6.9%) Asian, 105 (0.2%) Pacific Islander, 11,164 (18.0%) from other races, and 2,833 (4.6%) from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 22,613 persons (36.4%).

The Census reported that 61,457 people (98.9% of the population) lived in households, 187 (0.3%) lived in non-institutionalized group quarters, and 490 (0.8%) were institutionalized.

There were 22,097 households, out of which 8,462 (38.3%) had children under the age of 18 living in them, 10,952 (49.6%) were opposite-sex married couples living together, 2,917 (13.2%) had a female householder with no husband present, 1,389 (6.3%) had a male householder with no wife present. There were 1,530 (6.9%) unmarried opposite-sex partnerships, and 105 (0.5%) same-sex married couples or partnerships. 5,547 households (25.1%) were made up of individuals and 2,567 (11.6%) had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.78. There were 15,258 families (69.1% of all households); the average family size was 3.35.

The population was spread out with 17,282 people (27.8%) under the age of 18, 5,863 people (9.4%) aged 18 to 24, 15,931 people (25.6%) aged 25 to 44, 14,681 people (23.6%) aged 45 to 64, and 8,377 people (13.5%) who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 34.3 years. For every 100 females there were 95.5 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 92.1 males.

There were 23,792 housing units at an average density of 1,721.0 per square mile (664.5/km²), of which 12,091 (54.7%) were owner-occupied, and 10,006 (45.3%) were occupied by renters. The homeowner vacancy rate was 2.3%; the rental vacancy rate was 8.2%. 32,153 people (51.7% of the population) lived in owner-occupied housing units and 29,304 people (47.2%) lived in rental housing units.

There approximately 4,336 adults who haven't passed ninth grade, including Nick Diaz,[15] 5,175 that have some high school education, 8,910 individuals that have completed a high school education only, 8,367 with some college, 2,777 have an Associate Degree, individuals with a Bachelor's Degree number 3,797, those with a graduate degree 1,685. the total percentage with a high school diploma or higher are 79% of the population.

2000[edit]

As of the 2000 census, 68,000 people or 14,339 families resided in the city, in 20,692 households. The population density was 4,657.9 people per square mile (1,798.0/km²). There were 21,378 housing units at an average density of 1,747.0 per square mile (674.4/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 74.42% White, 0.60% African American, 0.87% Native American, 5.05% Asian, 0.12% Pacific Islander, 13.99% from other races, and 4.95% from two or more races. 27.13% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

Of the 20,692 households counted in the 2000 census, 35.8% included children under the age of 18, 51.7% were married couples living together, 12.2% had a female householder with no husband present, and 30.7% were non-families. 25.4% of all households were made up of individuals and 11.2% had someone living alone who were 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.71 and the average family size was 3.25.

In the city, the population was spread out with 28.2% under the age of 18, 9.6% from 18 to 24, 28.1% from 25 to 44, 19.8% from 45 to 64, and 14.3% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 34 years. For every 100 females there were 95.3 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 91.8 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $39,570, and the median income for a family was $47,020. Males had a median income of $37,738 versus $27,073 for females. The per capita income for the city was $18,719. 16.7% of the population and 12.3% of families are below the poverty line. Out of the total population, 23.3% of those under the age of 18 and 9.6% of those 65 and older were living below the poverty line.

Geography[edit]

Lodi is flat terrain at an elevation of approximately 50 feet (15 m) above mean sea level datum.[16] Historically the area has had some grazing land uses as well as grain production.[17]

There has long been a movement in the area to preserve a "greenbelt" as a buffer zone between Lodi and Stockton in order to keep the two cities separate.[18]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city covers an area of 13.8 square miles (36 km2), 98.46% of it land, and 1.54% of it water.

Climate[edit]

Lodi has cool, wet winters, often characterized by dense ground fog, and very warm, dry summers. Due to the city's proximity to the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, summer temperatures usually dip into the fifties at night. Fog and low overcast sometimes drifts in from San Francisco Bay during the summer and it can be breezy at times especially during the night.

Average January temperatures are a maximum of 55 °F (13 °C) and a minimum of 37 °F (3 °C). Average July temperatures are a maximum of 91 °F (33 °C) and a minimum of 57 °F (14 °C). There are an average of 65.3 days with highs of 90 °F (32 °C) or higher and an average of 30.5 days with lows of 32 °F (0 °C) or lower. The record high temperature was 111 °F (44 °C) on June 15, 1961. The record low temperature was 11 °F (−12 °C) on January 11, 1949.

Annual precipitation averages 18 in (46 cm), falling on an average of 59 days. The wettest year was 1983 with 35.4 in (90 cm) and the dryest year was 1976 with 7.18 in (18.2 cm). The most rainfall in one month was 15.01 in (38.1 cm) in January 1911. The most rainfall in 24 hours was 3.76 in (9.6 cm) on December 11, 1906. Snow is very rare in Lodi, but 1.5 in (3.8 cm) fell on January 12, 1930. January is the wettest month.[19]

Climate data for Lodi, California
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Record high °F (°C) 72
(22)
82
(28)
87
(31)
96
(36)
104
(40)
111
(44)
110
(43)
109
(43)
108
(42)
101
(38)
87
(31)
76
(24)
111
(44)
Average high °F (°C) 55
(13)
62
(17)
67
(19)
74
(23)
81
(27)
87
(31)
91
(33)
90
(32)
87
(31)
79
(26)
64
(18)
55
(13)
74
(23)
Average low °F (°C) 37
(3)
40
(4)
43
(6)
45
(7)
50
(10)
54
(12)
57
(14)
56
(13)
53
(12)
48
(9)
41
(5)
36
(2)
47
(8)
Record low °F (°C) 11
(−12)
18
(−8)
22
(−6)
28
(−2)
32
(0)
37
(3)
40
(4)
40
(4)
34
(1)
29
(−2)
22
(−6)
13
(−11)
11
(−12)
Rainfall inches (mm) 3.56
(90.4)
3.29
(83.6)
2.99
(75.9)
1.16
(29.5)
0.61
(15.5)
0.13
(3.3)
0.06
(1.5)
0.08
(2)
0.34
(8.6)
1.05
(26.7)
2.35
(59.7)
2.60
(66)
18.22
(462.8)
Avg. rainy days 10 9 9 6 3 1 0 0 1 3 7 9 59
Source #1: http://www.weather.com/weather/wxclimatology/monthly/graph/USCA0623
Source #2: (rain days) http://www.wrcc.dri.edu/cgi-bin/cliMAIN.pl?ca5032

Industry[edit]

Early industries in Lodi included a saw mill, flour mill, vineyards, orchards, and cattle ranching.

The Lodi Land and Lumber Company saw mill was built on the south bank of the Mokelumne River in 1877, and relied on logs floated down from the Sierras during the rainy season. The mill was powered by a steam engine, and has a capacity of 40,000 board feet (94 m3) per day.[11]

The "Flame Tokay" grape was introduced from Algeria in 1857, and was a central feature of the vineyards that gradually rose to prominence because of the sandy loam soil and the location directly east of the Suisun Pass. For a brief period during the late 19th century the vines were usurped in favor of watermelons and wheat, but price cuts and labeling problems encouraged farmers to plant more vines.[12]

The early 20th century saw the establishment of several large manufacturers and general service providers with national distribution capabilities, such as Supermold, the Pinkerton Foundry, Lodi Truck Service, the Lodi Iron Works, Pacific Coast Producers, Holz Rubber Company, Valley Industries, and Goehring Meat Company.[20]

Today the Lodi area is home to several large manufacturing, general services, and agricultural companies, including Archer Daniels Midland, Blue Shield of California, Dart Container (www.dartcontainer.com/), General Mills, Holz Rubber Company, Kubota Tractors, Lodi Iron Works, Miller Packing Company, Pacific Coast Producers, Tiger Lines, Valley Industries, and Woodbridge-Robert Mondavi.[21]

Lodi is the birthplace of A&W Root Beer and A&W Restaurants established in 1919, which subsequently became one of the first franchised fast food restaurants.[22]

Top employers[edit]

According to the City's 2011 Comprehensive Annual Financial Report,[23] the top employers in the city are:

# Employer # of Employees
1 Lodi Unified School District 2,762
2 Lodi Memorial Hospital 1,329
3 Pacific Coast Producers 1,000
4 Blue Shield of California 850
5 Cottage Bakery 540
6 General Mills 480
7 City of Lodi 440
8 Farmers & Merchants Bank of Central California 353
9 Wal-Mart 245
10 Target 209

Entertainment and culture[edit]

Farmers market[edit]

The Farmers Market is held every Thursday evening from June 7 through Sept. 27 on School Street in Downtown Lodi. It is hosted and run by the Lodi Chamber of Commerce. It offers a large collection of fresh produce as well as baked goods, crafts, food vendors, and live entertainment.

Grapes and wine[edit]

Lodi and its surroundings are well known for the cultivation of grapes and production of wine. Starting in the early 20th century, and right up to the early 1980s, Lodi promoted itself as the "Tokay Capital of the World" due to the abundance of the Flame Tokay variety[24] in the area.[25] With the replacement by other varietals, primarily Zinfandel, Lodi now refers to itself as the wine-grape capital of California.

Every September the popular Lodi Grape Festival is held and includes rides, food, and wine tasting. Also popular is the Spring Wine Show (held in late March/early April, so as not to coincide with Easter every year), which showcases the area's 50-plus award-winning wineries.[26]

Museums[edit]

The Hill House Museum, a restored Queen Anne Victorian built around 1906 for a wealthy Lodian, contains historical exhibits relating to the history of the town, including the house's original furniture.[27]

The San Joaquin County Historical Society and Museum, the largest museum complex in the county, is just south of Lodi, at the Micke Grove Regional Park, and traces the history of the area through many exhibits and interactive displays.

World of Wonders, a downtown science museum modeled after the San Francisco Exploratorium, features interactive science exhibits, classrooms, and a retail store.[28] The museum first opened on January 4, 2009.[29]

Taste of Lodi[edit]

Taste of Lodi is one of the area's most prestigious food and wine events. The event supports tourism growth in the Lodi's community and features over 40 award-winning Lodi wineries along with food selections from some of the area's finest restaurants and caterers. The event also has wine seminars, chefs demonstrations, live music and a Port, Cigar and Chocolate Pavilion.[30]

Theater[edit]

Changing Faces Theater Company is a non-profit, student-run organization, which is supported by the Lodi Arts Commission. An annual two week production occurs each summer and is cast with mostly local children ranging from age six up to college students and, sometimes, a few adults. The production is normally staged at Jessie's Grove Winery where a number of additional activities are typically held at the same time.[31]

Lodi Musical Theatre Company is also prominent in the Lodi theatre community, staging shows at Hutchins Street Square such as "West Side Story" and "Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat".

Zinfest[edit]

Conceived in 2005 by the Lodi Winegrape Commission, this wine event is held at Lodi Lake and features Lodi's finest Zinfandel wines.[32] Usually held on the third weekend of May, this event includes a Friday night dinner called "Vintner's Grille".

Media[edit]

Pop culture[edit]

Music[edit]

A Creedence Clearwater Revival song, "Lodi", was named for Lodi, California, although the songwriter John Fogerty admits he had never actually visited the city and simply thought it was "the coolest sounding name."[33] Still, the song, with its chorus "Oh, Lord, stuck in Lodi again," has been the theme of various events in the city including a past Grape Festival. This puts an upbeat face on how the protagonist in the song laments both the coincidence of his running out of money and luck in Lodi, and what must not have been that warm a reception. He "came into town [on] a one-night [musical] stand," but his "plans fell through," presumably because Lodi didn't buy enough tickets to hear him. He also laments how now that he's in Lodi, it "looks like they took my friends."

Television[edit]

Lodi was also shown in E! network's reality TV show, The Girls Next Door.[citation needed]

The hit television program, Sons of Anarchy, is set in a fictional town a short distance from Lodi. In the show, Lodi is home of the Grim Bastards and Calavaras MC, two other gangs.

Sister cities[edit]

Lodi has two sister cities, as designated by Sister Cities International:

Notable natives and residents[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Griffin, Pete (May 26, 2011). "What's In a Name? Slogans Can Make or Break a City, Experts Say". Fox News. Retrieved March 19, 2014. 
  2. ^ "California Cities by Incorporation Date" (Word). California Association of Local Agency Formation Commissions. Retrieved August 25, 2014. 
  3. ^ "City of Lodi City Council". City of Lodi. Retrieved November 7, 2014. 
  4. ^ a b "Statewide Database". UC Regents. Retrieved November 18, 2014. 
  5. ^ "California's 9th Congressional District - Representatives & District Map". Civic Impulse, LLC. Retrieved March 12, 2013. 
  6. ^ "2010 Census Gazetteer File - Places - California". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved October 9, 2014. 
  7. ^ "Lodi". Geographic Names Information System, U.S. Geological Survey. Retrieved December 18, 2014. 
  8. ^ The 12 Zins of Lodi. Accessed February 7, 2008.
  9. ^ Lodi Wine and Visitor Center
  10. ^ Hillman, Raymond W.; Leonard Covello (1985). Cities and Towns of San Joaquin County since 1847. Fresno, CA 93727: Panorama West Books. p. 31. ISBN 0-914330-84-5. 
  11. ^ a b Hillman, Raymond W.; Leonard Covello (1985). Cities and Towns of San Joaquin County since 1847. Fresno, CA 93727: Panorama West Books. p. 32. ISBN 0-914330-84-5. 
  12. ^ a b Hillman, Raymond W.; Leonard Covello (1985). Cities and Towns of San Joaquin County since 1847. Fresno, CA 93727: Panorama West Books. p. 35. ISBN 0-914330-84-5. 
  13. ^ "Annual Estimates of the Resident Population for Incorporated Places: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2013". United States Census Bureau, Population Division. May 2014. Retrieved December 6, 2014. 
  14. ^ "2010 Census Interactive Population Search: CA - Lodi city". U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved July 12, 2014. 
  15. ^ Pugmire, Lance (9 April 2009). "MMA fighter Nick Diaz says smoking marijuana is part of his plan". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved 15 March 2013. 
  16. ^ United States Department of the Interior, Geological Survey, North Lodi 7.5 Minute Quadrangle Topographic Map (1968, photorevised 1976)
  17. ^ Earth Metrics Inc., Environmental Site Assessment for the Hale Road area, Lodi, California, Report # 10414.002, January 10, 1990
  18. ^ Thigpen, Daniel (2008-11-20). "Lodi ramps up greenbelt talk". Stockton Record. Retrieved 2009-04-10. 
  19. ^ "Average Weather for Lodi, CA - Temperature and Precipitation". Weather.com. Retrieved 2012-08-17. 
  20. ^ Hillman, Raymond W.; Leonard Covello (1985). Cities and Towns of San Joaquin County since 1847. Fresno, CA 93727: Panorama West Books. pp. 35–36. ISBN 0-914330-84-5. 
  21. ^ Lodi Chamber of Commerce. Accessed February 7, 2008.
  22. ^ Andrew F. Smith (2006). Encyclopedia of junk food and fast food. Greenwood. p. 1. ISBN 978-0-313-33527-3. 
  23. ^ "City of Lodi CAFR". Lodi.gov. Retrieved 2012-10-23. 
  24. ^ "Lodi’s forgotten fruit: Flame Tokays - Lodinews.com: News". Lodinews.com. 2010-10-13. Retrieved 2012-10-23. 
  25. ^ [1][dead link]
  26. ^ Adams, Haydn S. (2009-05-17). "Lodi Zinfest – Part 1 – The Winemakers dinner". Beyondnapavalley (WordPress). Retrieved 2011-05-03. 
  27. ^ "The Hill House". Lodihistory.org. Retrieved 2012-10-23. 
  28. ^ "WOW Science Museum". WOW Science Museum. Retrieved 2012-10-23. 
  29. ^ [2][dead link]
  30. ^ Kim Kavin (2008). The Everything Family Guide to Northern California and Lake Tahoe: A complete guide to San Francisco, Yosemite, Monterey, and Lake Tahoeand all the beautiful spots in between. Adams Media. ISBN 978-1-59869-714-8. 
  31. ^ "Changing Faces Theater Company". Changingfacestheater.org. Retrieved 2012-10-23. 
  32. ^ Kushman, Rick (2010-05-12). "The Good Life: Lodi ZinFest kicks off area's food and wine festivals". The Sacramento Bee. Retrieved 2011-05-03. 
  33. ^ Farrow, R. (2006)."Residents are proud to be ‘Stuck in Lodi’" Lodi News Sentinel. Retrieved June 7, 2007.
  34. ^ "Consolidation of Local Governments in Japan and Effects on Sister City Relationships," Consulate General of Japan, San Francisco
  35. ^ "Ronnie L. Launius". Find A Grave. Retrieved 1 January 2014. 

External links[edit]