Main Core

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Main Core is the code name of a database maintained since the 1980s by the federal government of the United States. Main Core contains personal and financial data of millions of U.S citizens believed to be threats to national security.[1] The data, which comes from the NSA, FBI, CIA, and other sources, is collected and stored without warrants or court orders. The database's name derives from the that that it contains “copies of the 'main core' or essence of each item of intelligence information on Americans produced by the FBI and the other agencies of the U.S intelligence community. The Main Core database is believed to have originated with the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) in 1982.

As of 2008 there were reportedly eight million Americans listed in the database as possible threats, often for trivial reasons, whom the government may choose to track, question, or detain in a time of crisis.

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At Johns Hopkins University a debate took place concerning the National Security Agency’s bulk surveillance program, professor David Cole detailed the kind of information the government can legally obtain simply by collecting metadata - who you call, when you call them, how long the call lasts for, how often the calls between the two parties are made, who are your closest friends, who are your family members, where do you go, what do you do, what websites do you use, who you email, who you communicate with on facebook, and what you search for on Google. The former CIA and NSA director, Michael Hayden, openly admitted after professor David Cole's comment on metadata that “We kill people based on metadata”.

Fixed[edit]

This post has been reverted back to how it was on 14 May 2014, by The Black Death. Do not spin doctor information, there is always a copy of the original somewhere ready to replace the propaganda version of truth.

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References[edit]

  1. ^ Shorrock, Tim (July 23, 2008). "Exposing Bush's historic abuse of power". Salon.com. Retrieved 2010-12-19. 

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