Manteca Bulletin

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Manteca Bulletin
Type Daily newspaper
Format Broadsheet
Owner(s) Morris Multimedia
Editor Dennis Wyatt
Founded November 1908, as Irrigation Bulletin
Headquarters 531 East Yosemite Avenue, Manteca, California, United States
Circulation 5,350 daily in 2011[1]
Website mantecabulletin.com

The Manteca Bulletin is the newspaper of record and daily newspaper for Manteca, California, United States. The Bulletin has been published for nearly 100 years. Once locally owned, the paper is now part of Morris Multimedia. The editor is Dennis Wyatt.

Community newspaper[edit]

The Bulletin is a community newspaper and places a heavy emphasis on local news. Like many community newspapers, the Bulletin does not report national or wire service news on its front page. However, the Bulletin will often localize national news if the story has a local impact, or to get local perspective. Non-local news is typically relegated to the inside pages and is often limited in scope.

Early history[edit]

To promote a large-scale water project that was the forerunner to today’s South San Joaquin Irrigation District, two men - F.L. Wurster and A.L. Cowell - joined forces to print the Irrigation Bulletin in November 1908. Originally printed in Stockton, California, the Bulletin was essentially a series of flyers distributed statewide promoting the irrigation of 70,000 acres (280 km2) of sandy loam soil around Manteca.[2]

With the help of the South San Joaquin Chamber of Commerce, the Bulletin expanded into a standard-size weekly newspaper on June 3, 1910, when it was moved from Stockton to Ripon. The paper continued to promote the South San Joaquin Irrigation District, which was founded in 1909, and carried news of the district's bond sales to investors throughout California.[2]

Water began flowing in 1915 and the South County's population boomed. Several newspapers arose to serve this community, among them the Escalon Times, Lathrop Sun and Ripon Record. The Bulletin changed its name to the Manteca Bulletin on November 6, 1914, and merged on March 22, 1918, with the Manteca Enterprise, which had been founded November 1, 1911.[2]

In 1923, George Murphy Sr. partnered with Louis Meyer to purchase the Manteca Bulletin. This began 50 years of ownership by the Murphy family; on April 1, 1972, when George Murphy Jr. sold the Bulletin to Charles Morris and his family-owned Morris Multimedia.[2]

Opinions and plagiarism[edit]

In response to an outcry over plagiarism in the newspaper's opinion pages, the Bulletin published an editorial acknowledging the problem in 2009.[3] The Bulletin as since stopped publishing these letters in their online edition while still allowing the letters in the print edition.[citation needed]

The newspaper's editorials are characterized by a conservative stance on immigration and social issues. For example, Managing Editor Dennis Wyatt wrote that if immigrants "preferred their lives in whatever country they heralded where they weren’t required to speak English to communicate in a business, in school, on a job or with the government then perhaps they should have thought twice about coming to the United States."[this quote needs a citation]

In early 2012, the newspaper's opinion pages featured excerpts from the book "Suicide of a Superpower" by Pat Buchanan, including chapters titled "The End of White America" and "The Death of Christian America", after Mr. Buchanan was fired from MSNBC for publishing this material.[citation needed]

Competition[edit]

The paper competes locally with the Modesto Bee, The Record, and the San Joaquin Herald, as well as the weekly Ripon Record.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Annual Audit Report, June 2011". Larkspur, Calif.: Verified Audit Circulation. Retrieved April 30, 2012. 
  2. ^ a b c d "About Us". MantecaBulletin.com. Retrieved May 2, 2012. 
  3. ^ Wyatt, Dennis (23 December 2009). "Of plagiarism personal attacks & lack of civility". Manteca Bulletin. Retrieved 2009-12-28. 

External links[edit]