Marianum

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For other uses, see Marianum (disambiguation).
This article is about the pontifical institute. For Ptolemy's town of Corsica, see Bonifacio, for the plant S. marianum, see Silybum marianum.

The Marianum is both the name of a Pontifical institute for the study of Mariology and the name of a prestigious journal of Marian theology.[1] The school and the journal share the same name since their formation was based on the work of Father Gabriel Roschini, who founded both the journal and the modern educational institute.

The name Marianum itself goes back to Pope Boniface IX, who in 1398 granted the Servants of Mary the right to confer theological degrees. This college in Rome was closed in 1870 by the victorious Italian government, which took over the Papal States, Rome and many papal institutions. It opened again under the name Sant' Alessio Falconieri in 1895.[2]

In 1939 Father Roschini founded the journal Marianum and directed it for thirty years. In 1950, he founded the Marianum Theological Faculty, which, on December 8, 1955 became a Pontifical faculty by Decree Coelesti Honorandae Reginae of the Sacred Congregation of Seminaries and Universities under the authority of Pope Pius XII. Father Roschini served as the rector. Since 1971, the pontifical institute has been open to lay persons.[3][4]

The Marianum theological faculty is now a well-known academic institution for the study of Mariology and is located at Viale 30 Aprile- 6, 00153, Rome. The Marianum offers both a Master's degree in Mariology (2-year academic program) and a doctorate in Mariology. This Mariological facility has a library with more than 85,000 volumes on Mariology and a number of magazines and journals that treat of theological and Mariological topics.

Notable Alumni[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Mariology Society of America". Retrieved December 1, 2010. 
  2. ^ Annuario Pontificio 2012, p.1906
  3. ^ Centers of Marian Study http://www.servidimaria.org/en/attualita/promotori2/promotori2.htm
  4. ^ Publisher’s Notice in the Second Italian Edition (1986), reprinted in English Edition, Gabriel Roschini, O.S.M. (1989). The Virgin Mary in the Writings of Maria Valtorta (English Edition). Kolbe's Publication Inc. ISBN 2-920285-08-4

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 41°52′55″N 12°28′31″E / 41.88194°N 12.47528°E / 41.88194; 12.47528