Mark Hunt (politician)

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This article is about the West Virginia state legislator. For the New Zealand MMA fighter, see Mark Hunt. For the English footballer, see Mark Hunt (footballer).
Mark Hunt
Member of the West Virginia House of Delegates
from the 36th[1] district
Incumbent
Assumed office
January 12, 2013
Preceded by Joe Talbott
Member of the West Virginia House of Delegates
from the 30th district
In office
January 2009 – January 2013
Member of the West Virginia House of Delegates
from the 30th district
In office
January 2005 – January 2007
Member of the West Virginia House of Delegates
from the 31st district
In office
January 1995 – January 2001
Personal details
Born (1960-01-23) January 23, 1960 (age 55)
Charleston, West Virginia
Nationality American
Political party Democratic
Residence Charleston, West Virginia
Alma mater University of Charleston
Marshall University
Columbia University
Profession Attorney
Website markahunt.net

Mark Allen Hunt[2] (born January 23, 1960 in Charleston, West Virginia) is an American politician and a Democratic member of the West Virginia House of Delegates representing District 36 since January 12, 2013. Hunt served consecutively from January 2009 until January 2013, and non-consecutively from January 1995 until January 2001 and from January 2005 until January 2007 in District 30 and District 31 seats. Hunt was a candidate for West Virginia Senate in 2000 and a candidate for the United States House of Representatives for West Virginia's 2nd congressional district in 2006.

Education[edit]

Hunt earned his BA from the University of Charleston, his MA from Marshall University, and attended Columbia University.

Elections[edit]

  • 2012 Redistricted to District 36 with fellow District 30 incumbent Representatives Nancy Guthrie and Danny Wells, Hunt placed second in the seven-way May 8, 2012 Democratic Primary with 2,834 votes (20.4%),[3] and placed first in the six-way three-position November 6, 2012 General election with 9,325 votes (19.7%) ahead of Representatives Wells (D) and Guthrie (D) and Republican nominees Robin Holstein, Stevie Thaxton, and Steve Sweeney.[4]
  • 1994 Hunt was initially elected in the District 31 Democratic Primary and the November 8, 1994 General election, and re-elected in the November 5, 1996 General election.
  • 1998 Hunt was challenged in the three-way 1998 Democratic Primary, but won, and won the November 3, 1998 General election against Libertarian candidate John Sturgeon.
  • 2000 To challenge Senate District 8 incumbent Republican Senator Vic Sprouse, Hunt ran in the 2000 Democratic Primary and won, but lost the November 7, 2000 General election to Senator Sprouse, who held the seat from 1997 until 2009.
  • 2004 April 30 his third son Jackie Lee Hunt was born. When District 30 Representative Foster ran for West Virginia Senate and left a district seat open, Hunt placed in the fourteen-way 2004 Democratic Primary and was elected in the fourteen-way seven-position November 2, 2004 General election which re-elected incumbents Jon Amores (D), Bonnie Brown (D), and Bobbie Hatfield (D), and nominees Corey Palumbo (D), Sharon Spencer (D), Danny Wells (D), and unseated Representative Calvert (R).
  • 2006 To challenge West Virginia's 2nd Congressional District incumbent Republican United States Representative Shelley Moore Capito, Hunt ran in the 2006 Democratic Primary but lost to Mike Callaghan; Congresswoman Capito was re-elected in the November 7, 2006 General election.
  • 2008 When Representative Palumbo ran for West Virginia Senate and Representative Amores retired, leaving two district seats open, Hunt placed fifth in the seventeen-way May 13, 2008 Democratic Primary with 10,512 votes (8.5%),[5] and placed fifth in the fifteen-way seven-position November 4, 2008 General election with 21,635 votes (8.0%) behind Democratic nominee Doug Skaff and incumbent Representatives Wells, Brown (D), and Hatfield (D), and ahead of incumbents Spencer (D) and Guthrie (D), all seven Republican nominees and Mountain Party candidate John Welbourn.[6]
  • 2010 Hunt placed sixth in the thirteen-way May 11, 2010 Democratic Primary with 5,158 votes (10.0%),[7] and placed sixth in the fourteen-way seven-position November 2, 2010 General election with 17,197 votes (7.8%) behind incumbent Representative Skaff (D), Republican nominee Eric Nelson, incumbents Wells (S), Hatfield (D), and Brown (D), and ahead of and incumbent Guthrie(D), unseated Representative Spencer (D) and the remaining Republican nominees.[8]

Involvement with Clonaid[edit]

In 2001, the FDA discovered that the equipment in Raelian-founded Clonaid's human cloning lab in Nitro, West Virginia.[9] had been bought by Hunt, who wanted to clone his deceased 10-month-old son, Andrew. Following the investigation, Mark Hunt made an agreement with the FDA-OCI to not clone his son within the United States.[9]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Mark Hunt". Charleston, West Virginia: West Virginia Legislature. Retrieved March 31, 2014. 
  2. ^ "Danny Wells' Biography". Project Vote Smart. Retrieved March 31, 2014. 
  3. ^ "Statewide Results Primary Election May 8, 2012 Official Results". Charleston, West Virginia: Secretary of State of West Virginia. Retrieved March 31, 2014. 
  4. ^ "Statewide Results General Election November 6, 2012 Official Results". Charleston, West Virginia: Secretary of State of West Virginia. Retrieved March 31, 2014. 
  5. ^ "Statewide Results Primary Election May 13, 2008 Official Results". Charleston, West Virginia: Secretary of State of West Virginia. Retrieved March 31, 2014. 
  6. ^ "Statewide Results General Election November 4, 2008 Official Results". Charleston, West Virginia: Secretary of State of West Virginia. Retrieved March 31, 2014. 
  7. ^ "Statewide Results Primary Election May 11, 2010 Official Results". Charleston, West Virginia: Secretary of State of West Virginia. Retrieved March 31, 2014. 
  8. ^ "Statewide Results General Election November 2, 2010 Official Results". Charleston, West Virginia: Secretary of State of West Virginia. Retrieved March 31, 2014. 
  9. ^ a b Kolata, Gina, and Chang Kenneth, For Clonaid, a Trail of Unproven Claims, New York Times. Retrieved 11 October 2007.

External links[edit]