Marvel Fanfare

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Marvel Fanfare (Volume 1 + 2)
Cover for Marvel Fanfare #53 (October 1990). Art by John Buscema
Publication information
Publisher Marvel Comics
Schedule (Vol. 1) bimonthly
(Vol. 2) monthly
Format Series
Genre
Publication date (Vol. 1) March 1982 - January 1991
(Vol. 2) September 1996 - February 1997
Number of issues (Vol. 1) 60
(Vol. 2) 6
Main character(s) various Marvel Comics characters
Creative team
Writer(s) various
Artist(s) various
Editor(s) (Vol. 1) Al Milgrom
(Vol. 2) James Felder

Marvel Fanfare is the title of two comic book series published by Marvel Comics. Both versions of Marvel Fanfare were anthology, showcase titles featuring a variety of characters from the Marvel universe.

Volume One[edit]

Marvel Fanfare featured characters and settings from throughout the Marvel Universe, and included stories of varying lengths by a vast array of different creators.[1] The title was published every two months from March 1982 to December 1991 and ran for 60 issues. It was edited throughout its run by Al Milgrom, who also wrote and drew an illustrated column in most issues, entitled "Editori-Al". Marvel Fanfare's original working title was Marvel Universe, which was later appropriated by Marvel editor-in-chief Jim Shooter for the encyclopedia series The Official Handbook of the Marvel Universe.[2]

The series began with a Spider-Man/Angel team-up story by Chris Claremont and Michael Golden.[3] Other Spider-Man appearance in the title included team-ups with the Scarlet Witch in issue #6 (January 1983)[4] and the Hulk in issue #47 (November 1989).[5] A Silver Surfer story by Steve Englehart and John Buscema that was originally intended for the character's own series appeared in Marvel Fanfare #51.[6]

Marvel Fanfare was envisioned as a showcase of the comics industry's best talent. Each issue featured 36 pages of material with no advertisements and it was printed on magazine-style slick paper. it was more than twice as expensive as standard comic books ($1.25 in 1982 when most titles were 60 cents and $2.25 in 1991 when most were $1).

Editor Milgrom wrote of his experience with the series:

Volume Two[edit]

Marvel Fanfare Volume Two was published monthly for 6 issues between 1996 and 1997. This version of the title was edited by James Felder.

Like the first volume the title featured different creative teams in each issue and starred different characters from around the Marvel universe. However, the talent were mostly newcomers, the paper was cheap and it cost half the price of most other comics (99 cents when most comics cost $1.95).

The title is notable for featuring the early work of writer Joe Kelly and penciller Scott Kolins.

Collected Editions[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ DeFalco, Tom; Gilbert, Laura, ed. (2008). "1980s". Marvel Chronicle A Year by Year History. Dorling Kindersley. p. 206. ISBN 978-0756641238. It was an anthology that featured work by talented newcomers as well as work by the company's most popular creators. 
  2. ^ DeFalco, Tom. "Bullpen Bulletins Special," Marvel Comics cover dated March 1984.
  3. ^ Manning, Matthew K.; Gilbert, Laura, ed. (2012). "1980s". Spider-Man Chronicle Celebrating 50 Years of Web-Slinging. Dorling Kindersley. p. 126. ISBN 978-0756692360. The debut issue featured the inspired pairing of writer Chris Claremont and artist Michael Golden as they teamed up two other fan-favorites, the X-Men's Angel and Spider-Man. 
  4. ^ Manning "1980s" in Gilbert (2012), p. 132: "Behind an impressive cover by artist P. Craig Russell was a single-issue tale by writer Mike W. Barr and co-plotter and penciler Sandy Plunkett. Encountering a vacant-eyed Scarlet Witch on a Manhattan rooftop, Spider-Man was shocked when she attacked him."
  5. ^ Manning "1980s" in Gilbert (2012), p. 179: "Revered artist Michael Golden let Spider-Man shine when he teamed up with writer Bill Mantlo to pit Spider-Man against the Incredible Hulk once again."
  6. ^ Englehart, Steve (n.d.). "Silver Surfer 1-31". SteveEnglehart.com. Archived from the original on January 27, 2013. Retrieved January 27, 2013. That first issue was shelved and I started over with a new #1. That "earthbound" first issue later appeared as an "imaginary story" in Marvel Fanfare. 
  7. ^ Marvel Fanfare at the Grand Comics Database

External links[edit]