Mount Nōtori

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Mount Nōtori
農鳥岳
Mt.Noutoridake from Mt.Ainodake 01.jpg
Mount Nōtori from Mount Aino
Elevation 3,026 m (9,928 ft)[1]
Listing 200 Famous Japanese Mountains
Pronunciation [noːtoɽidake]
Location
Location Chūbu region, Honshū, Japan
Range Akaishi Mountains
Coordinates 35°37′16″N 138°14′13″E / 35.62111°N 138.23694°E / 35.62111; 138.23694Coordinates: 35°37′16″N 138°14′13″E / 35.62111°N 138.23694°E / 35.62111; 138.23694
Climbing
Easiest route Hike
Shiranesanzan (from left to right: Mount Nōtori, Mount Aino, Mount Kita), view from Mount Kenashi in Shizuoka Prefecture (November 2006)

Mount Nōtori (農鳥岳 Nōtori-dake?), or Nōtoridake, is one of the major peaks in the Akaishi Mountains, along with Mount Kita and Mount Aino. The 3,026 m (9,928 ft) peak[2] lies to the south of the other mountains, spanning the town of Hayakawa in Yamanashi Prefecture and Aoi-ku in the city of Shizuoka, Shizuoka Prefecture, Japan.

Geography[edit]

The top of the mountain is divided into two peaks. The southeastern peak, known as Mount Nōtori, is 3,026 m (9,928 ft), while the northwestern peak, known as Mount Nishinōtori (西農鳥岳 Nishinōtori-dake?), is 3,051 m (10,010 ft).[2] It is located in the Minami Alps National Park.[3]

The main mountains of the Akaishi Mountains are Mount Kitadake, Mount Aino and Mount Nōtori. The three mountains together are called "Shiranesanzan" (白根三山 Shiranesanzan?), which means "three white summits".

Mountain huts[edit]

The major mountain huts on the mountain are the Nōtori Huts (農鳥小屋 Nōtori Goya?) at the base of Mount Nishinōtori. Slightly further down the mountain are the Daimonzawa Huts (大門沢小屋 Daimonzawa Goya?).

Gallery[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Altitude of the main mountain in Japan (in Yamanashi prefecture)" (in Japanese). Geospatial Information Authority of Japan. Retrieved 2011-03-31. 
  2. ^ a b Mount Nōtori. (Japanese) Minami Alps Net. Accessed July 1, 2008.
  3. ^ "Minami Alps National Park". Ministry of the Environment (Japan). Retrieved 2011-03-31.