Newland with Woodhouse Moor

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Newland with Woodhouse Moor
Civil parish
Coordinates: 53°41′49″N 1°26′24″W / 53.697°N 1.440°W / 53.697; -1.440Coordinates: 53°41′49″N 1°26′24″W / 53.697°N 1.440°W / 53.697; -1.440
Country England
Primary council City of Wakefield
County West Yorkshire
Region Yorkshire and the Humber
Status Civil parish
Main settlements none
Government
 • UK Parliament Normanton
 • EU Parliament Yorkshire and the Humber
Population
 • Total 0

Newland with Woodhouse Moor is a civil parish in the City of Wakefield in West Yorkshire, England, consisting of some open countryside west of Normanton, including Newland Hall.

The records of the Newlands estate go back 900 years, and indicate that it was established in 1213 by King John I as a community of the Knights Templar, and subsequently fell to the Knights Hospitaller, who maintained a preceptory there. Newland was only one of two preceptories in West Yorkshire, the other being that of the Knights Templar at Temple Newsam, and the only one established by the Knights Hospitaller.

'Double cross' shield of Knights Hospitaller which appeared on the buildings at Newland preceptory

Early in its history, the preceptory was the beneficiary of the largesse of a powerful patron, Roger Le Peytevin, lord of the manor of nearby Altofts.[1] Later, the longtime lords of the manor were the Levett family, who also had ties to nearby Normanton as well as to the chivalric order. On 2 October 1447, William Lyvett (Levett) was admitted tenant to the Knights Hospitaller at Newland and preceptor of the Hospitallers' community there.[2]

At the time of the Dissolution of the Monasteries, King Henry VIII dissolved the Newland preceptory and confiscated the property. It was subsequently sold to a member of the Bunny family of Newton. Later, the Silvester family purchased the estate, and in 1740 built Newland Hall as its principal residence. The 54-room Hall was demolished in 1917.[3] The farm buildings belonging to the former Newland Hall are Grade II listed buildings, as is the old stable block associated with the property, and which once carried the cross of the Knights Hospitaller.

The 2001 census recorded a population of zero for the parish, which was once an extra-parochial area.[4]

Newland Hall, built ca. 1740, demolished 1917.
Historical population
Year Pop.   ±%  
1861 78 —    
1871 46 −41.0%
1881 49 +6.5%
1891 57 +16.3%
1901 40 −29.8%
1911 37 −7.5%
1921 38 +2.7%
1931 41 +7.9%
1971 9 −78.0%

References[edit]

  1. ^ Wheater, William (1889). Temple Newsam: Its History and Antiquities. Leeds: Goodall and Suddick. 
  2. ^ Banks, William Stott (1871). Walks in Yorkshire; Wakefield and its neighbourhood. London: Longmans, Green, Reader & Dyer. 
  3. ^ "Newland Estate". Stanley History Online. Retrieved 2010-01-22. 
  4. ^ Office for National Statistics : Census 2001 : Parish Headcounts : Wakefield Retrieved 2009-09-11