Nicknames of Vancouver

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There are many nicknames for the city of Vancouver, the largest city in British Columbia and third-largest metropolitan area in Canada. Some reflect the city's history, climate, geography, economy, and demographics. Others have their origins in cultural aspects of the city and its inhabitants.

Historical[edit]

The first non-aboriginal settlement in the area was known as Gastown. This name continues today as a nickname for Vancouver, although more specifically for a certain area adjacent to the Downtown Eastside.

Geographical and climate[edit]

  • Rain City (or Raincouver or the Wet Coast) - Vancouver receives on average 1,199mm of rainfall a year (YVR).[1] Especially during the winter months, the city has a reputation for wet weather.
  • Saltwater City (鹹水埠; Jyutping: Haam shui Fahw) - The name for Vancouver used by early Chinese immigrants to the city.[3]

Industrial[edit]

  • Hollywood North[4] - the city is home to the fourth-largest film and television production industry in North America, after L.A., New York and Toronto.[5]

Cultural[edit]

  • Lotusland - coined by Vancouver Sun writer Allan Fotheringham, Lotusland refers to Homer's Odyssey, in which the hero, Odysseus, visits a land whose inhabitants are befuddled by a narcotic lotus (the "Land of the Lotus-Eaters"). It sometimes is used to describe all of British Columbia.[7]
  • Left Coast - Referring to the (perceived) left leaning political views of the city inhabitants.
  • City of Glass - taken from the title of a Douglas Coupland book, this name reflects the dominant steel-and-glass architectural aesthetic of the city's downtown.[8]
  • No Fun City - a long-time nickname[9] which can refer to a variety of things depending on use and context. It can refer to some of the city's cultural policies that result in a less lively local music scene,[9] to a perceived "lame" nightlife.[10]

Demographical[edit]

  • Hongcouver - A name with some xenophobic connotations, it came into use in the 1980s and 1990s. Although Vancouver has had a large Asian community from its earliest days, the Chinese population surged as large numbers of Hong Kong citizens immigrated prior to the British handover of that city in 1997.[11]

Diminutives[edit]

  • Van - common usage throughout the area
  • Vancity - popular with the Canadian hip hop community (also the name of a credit union, Vancity)
  • The Couve - the middle section of the city's name, popular with young locals as well as tourists.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Canadian Climate Normals 1971–2000". Environment Canada. 2009-04-30. Retrieved July 28, 2010. 
  2. ^ "Editors' Picks: City history and landmarks". Georgia Straight. Retrieved July 28, 2010. 
  3. ^ By Any Other Name: Salt Water City, Vancouver is Awesome, 6 December 2011
  4. ^ "B.C. Facts". Province of British Columbia. Retrieved July 28, 2010. 
  5. ^ BC Film Commission
  6. ^ Hampson, Sarah (October 22, 2007). "Prince of pot or dope of Vansterdam?". Toronto: Globe and Mail. Retrieved July 28, 2010. 
  7. ^ Grant, Kelly; Mehler Paperny, Anna. "How cities grow – up is in". Toronto: Globe and Mail. Retrieved July 28, 2010. 
  8. ^ Rowe, Dan. "A career spent being curious about Vancouver". Vancouver Sun. Retrieved July 28, 2010. 
  9. ^ a b James, Melissa. "No Fun City - About". No Fun City. Retrieved December 6, 2012. 
  10. ^ Moxley, Mitch. "Welcome To Vancouver: 'No Fun City'". Huffington Post. Retrieved December 6, 2012. 
  11. ^ Cernetig, Michael. "Chinese Vancouver: A decade of change". Vancouver Sun. Retrieved July 28, 2010.