Pittsburgh Bureau of Fire

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Pittsburgh Bureau of Fire
Operational area
Country  United States
State  Pennsylvania
City Pittsburgh
Agency overview[1]
Established September 12, 1793
Annual calls 45,236 (2012)
Employees 630
Staffing Career
Fire chief Darryl Jones
EMS level BLS
IAFF 1
Facilities and equipment[1]
Divisions 1
Battalions 4
Stations 30
Engines 34
Trucks 11
Quints 3
HAZMAT 2
USAR 1
Fireboats 2
Website
Official website
Official IAFF

The Pittsburgh Bureau of Fire (PBF) provides fire protection, emergency medical services and hazardous material mitigation to the city of the City of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.[2] In all the department is responsible for 55.5 square miles (144 km2) with a population of 305,841 as of the 2013 Census estimation.[3] The Bureau holds the distinction of being the first fire department in the United States to unionize and thus has a International Association of Fire Fighters (IAFF) number of 1.[4]

History[edit]

The department started out as a volunteer fire department and officially transitioned to a fully paid department on May 23, 1870.[4] Over 30 years later in 1903 a group of Pittsburgh Firefighters sought to improve working and living conditions of those serving in the department. They formed an association known as the City Fireman’s Protective Association. By September 1903, the very first International Association of Fire Fighters union was organized, IAFF Local No. 1.[4]

Stations and apparatus[edit]

The quarters of Engine 3.

Below is a complete listing of all fire station and apparatus locations in the city of Pittsburgh according to Battalion.

Neighborhood Engine Truck Special Command Battalion
3 Strip District Engine 3 M.A.C. 1, M.A.C. 2 2
4 Uptown Engine 4 Truck 4 Deputy chief 2
6 Lawrenceville Engine 6 Truck 6 3
7 Stanton Heights Engine 7 Arson Unit 1, Arson Unit 2, Arson Unit 3 3
8 East Liberty Engine 8 Truck 8 Battalion 3 3
10 Upper Oakland Engine 10 PEMS Medic 5 2
12 Greenfield Engine 12 PEMS Medic 7 2
13 Hazelwood Engine 13 Truck 13 2
14 Oakland Truck 14 Battalion 2 2
15 Lincoln-Lemington Engine 15 3
16 Wilkinsburg Engine 16 3
17 Homewood Engine 17 Truck 17 3
18 Squirrel Hill Engine 18(Quint) 2
19 Swisshelm Park Engine 19 2
20 Hays Engine 20 PEMS Medic 12 4
22 Arlington Engine 22 4
23 Carrick Engine 23(Quint) Command Unit 200 4
24 South Side Engine 24 Truck 24 Battalion 4 4
26 Brookline Engine 26 Truck 26 4
27 Mt. Washington Engine 27(Quint) Aerial 2(Reserve) 4
28 Beechview Engine 28 4
29 Westwood Engine 29 Haz-Mat./Foam 29 4
30 Elliott Engine 30 Truck 30 1
31 Sheraden Engine 31 1
32 Spring Garden Engine 32 Truck 32 Haz-Mat./Spill Unit 1 1
33 Woods Run Truck 33 1
34 Observatory Hill Engine 34 1
35 Brighton Heights Engine 35 1
37 Manchester Engine 37 Haz-Mat./Foam Unit 37 Battalion 1 1
38 Northview Heights Engine 38 1

In pop culture[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Response Statistics". Pittsburgh Bureau of Fire. Retrieved 10 March 2015. 
  2. ^ "About the Bureau". Pittsburgh Bureau of Fire. Retrieved 10 March 2015. 
  3. ^ "Population Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2014-06-11. 
  4. ^ a b c "Pittsburgh Fire Fighters History". IAFF Local 1. Retrieved 10 March 2015.