Purdue Boilermakers baseball

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Purdue Boilermakers
Founded: 1888 (1888)
Purdue Boilermakers athletic logo

University Purdue University
Conference Big Ten
Leaders Division
Location West Lafayette, IN
Head Coach Doug Schreiber (16th year)
Home Stadium Alexander Field
(Capacity: 1,500)
Nickname Boilermakers
Colors

Black and Gold

            
NCAA Tournament Appearances
1987, 2012
Conference Tournament Champions
2012
Conference Champions
1909, 2012

The Purdue Boilermakers baseball team is the varsity intercollegiate baseball program of Purdue University in West Lafayette, Indiana, United States. The program's first season was in 1888, and it has been a member of the NCAA Division I Big Ten Conference since the start of the 1906 season. Its home venue is Alexander Field, located on Purdue's campus. Doug Schreiber has been the team's head coach since the start of the 1999 season. The program has appeared in 2 NCAA Tournaments. It has won one conference tournament championship and 2 regular season conference titles. As of the start of the 2013 Major League Baseball season, 17 former Boilermakers have appeared in Major League Baseball.

History[edit]

Early history[edit]

The program's first season of play was 1888, and the team played without a head coach until 1892, when W. M. Phillips became the head coach. Also in 1892, the program began playing at newly dedicated home venue Stuart Field. The first game at Stuart was against Butler on April 16, 1892. Purdue won the game 14–9.[1][2]

Dutch Fehring, head coach of the program from 1936–1942.

After Phillips' two-year tenure as head coach (1892–1893), the program played without a head coach until 1900, when W. H. Fox assumed the position for two seasons (1900–1901). The program then had several different head coaches until Hugh Nicol began a nine-year tenure in 1906. Nicol's first season was also the program's first as a member of the Big Nine Conference (renamed the Big Ten Conference following the 1917 season, when Michigan rejoined the conference after a twelve-season hiatus). In 1909, Purdue won its first Big Ten Championship.[1] Future Major League Baseball player Walt Tragesser played on the 1909 team.[3]

Nicol left the head coaching position following the 1914 season, and B. P. Pattison (previously the head coach at West Virginia) coached the team for the next two seasons (1915–1916).[1][4]

In 1916, Pattison's final season, Purdue had an 8–4 record in Big Ten games. However, Purdue had generally struggled in Big Ten games since joining the conference and continued to do so. The Boilermakers had a winning conference record only 11 times from 1917–1978. In that span, the team opened two new home venues. On April 6, 1940, the team defeated Wabash College 7–4 in its first game at Ross–Ade Field, later renamed Lambert Field. On April 14, 1965, the Boilermakers lost 4–2 to Notre Dame in the team's first game at the modern Lambert Field.[1] Both Old Lambert Field and the modern Lambert Field were named for Ward Lambert, head coach of the program for 19 seasons (1917, 1919–1935, 1945–1946).[2]

Dave Alexander era[edit]

In 1978, Dave Alexander became the program's head coach. When the Big Ten split into two, five-team divisions in 1981, the team finished 2nd behind Michigan, Purdue's best conference finish since 1928. As a result of the second-place finish, the team qualified for the inaugural Big Ten Tournament, which was also the program's first postseason appearance. The team finished the tournament with a 1–2 record.[1][5] Purdue qualified for two more conference tournaments in the 1980s (1986, 1987) and reached its first NCAA Tournament in 1987. Playing in the Mideast Regional, Purdue went 0–2, losing 13–3 to Texas A&M and 8–7 to Western Carolina.[6]

Steve Green era[edit]

Alexander stepped down from the head coaching position following the 1991 season as the program's all-time wins leader with 407. He was replaced by Steve Green. During Green's tenure, the team qualified for three Big Ten Tournaments (1993, 1995, 1997). However, after a 2–9 start to the 1998 season, Green struck a player in an altercation following a loss to Evansville. He resigned following the altercation.[1][7] Interim coach Bob Shepherd was the head coach for the rest of the 1998 season, and the team had a 21–20 record during Shepherd's tenure to finish 23–29 overall.[1]

Doug Schreiber era[edit]

Prior to the 1999 season, Purdue hired Doug Schreiber as its permanent head coach. In the 2000s decade, Schreiber's teams appeared in seven Big Ten Tournaments and finished second in the conference three times (2001, 2005, 2008).[1]

In 2012, Purdue had its most successful season. On April 15, Schreiber won his 407th and 408th games in a doubleheader sweep of Illinois, passing Dave Alexander as the program's winningest head coach.[8] The team, after winning both the regular season conference championship and the Big Ten Tournament, was given a #1 seed in the NCAA Tournament and hosted a regional. Due to Lambert Field's not meeting NCAA standards and construction delays on the program's new home venue, Alexander Field, Purdue hosted the regional at U.S. Steel Yard in Gary, Indiana.[9] After winning its opening round game against Valparaiso, Purdue lost consecutive games to Kent State and Kentucky and was eliminated from the tournament.[10] Purdue finished the season with a 45 wins, a school record.[11]

Conference affiliations[edit]

Venues[edit]

Since the program began play in 1888, it has had four venues, each on the university's campus.

Stuart Field[edit]

Main article: Stuart Field

From 1892–1939, the team played at Stuart Field on the university's campus. Currently, the Elliott Hall of Music stands on the former site of Stuart Field.[2]

Old Lambert Field[edit]

The Boilermakers played at Old Lambert Field from 1940–1964.[2] At the beginning of its use, Old Lambert Field was known as Ross–Ade Field (named for David E. Ross and George Ade, also the benefactors of Ross–Ade Stadium, the school's football venue).[12] Old Lambert Field was located next to Lambert Fieldhouse.[2]

Lambert Field[edit]

The program played at Lambert Field from prior to the 1965 season until the end of the 2012 season. Named for former Purdue baseball and men's basketball coach Ward Lambert, the venue had a capacity of 1,100 spectators. It was torn down in summer 2012. The field was located next to the current location of Purdue's Student Fitness and Wellness Center.[2]

Alexander Field[edit]

In 2013, the program began playing at Alexander Field. The venue was scheduled for completion prior to the 2012 season, but construction delays caused the completion date to be pushed back.[13] The venue has a capacity of 1,500 spectators.[14]

Head coaches[edit]

The program's most successful coach is current head coach Doug Schreiber, who has 442 victories at the school, as of the end of the 2013 season. Schreiber passed Dave Alexander on the Purdue wins list on April 15, 2012, when Purdue swept a doubleheader against Illinois.[8]

Purdue's longest tenured head coach is Ward Lambert, who coached the team for a total of 19 seasons in three separate coaching stints.[1]

Year(s) Coach Seasons W-L-T Pct
1888–1891 None 4 12–6 .667
1892–1893 W. M. Phillips 2 6–6 .500
1894–1899 None 6 16–19 .457
1900–1901 W. H. Fox 2 19–10 .655
1902 Bill Priel 1 10–4–1 .714
1903–1904 J. C. Kelsey 2 15–16 .484
1905 Philip O'Neil 1 9–7 .563
1906–1914 Hugh Nicol 9 67–36 .650
1915–1916 B. P. Pattison 2 19–15 .559
1917, 1919–1935,
1945–1946
Ward Lambert 19 163–158–7 .508
1918 John Pierce 1 6–7 .462
1936–1942 Dutch Fehring 7 84–76–5 .525
1943–1944 C. S. Doan 2 15–16–1 .484
1947–1950 Mel Taube 4 52–40–3 .565
1951–1955 Hank Stram 5 53–58–2 .477
1956–1959 Paul Hoffman 4 52–49–2 .525
1960–1977 Joe Sexson 18 221–318–8 .410
1978–1991 Dave Alexander 14 407–378–7 .518
1992–1998 Steve Green 6+ 136–201–1 .404
1998 Bob Shepherd <1 21–20 .512
1999–present Doug Schreiber 15 442–396 .527
TOTALS
21
125
1852–1816–37
.505

Current coaching staff[edit]

  • Head coachDoug Schreiber
  • Assistant coach – Tristan McIntyre
  • Assistant coach – Wally Crancer
  • Volunteer assistant coach – Payton Bieker

Yearly record[edit]

Season Coach Overall Conference Standing Postseason
Independent (1888–1905)
1888 None 5–2
1889 None 3–0
1890 None 2–2
1891 None 2–2
1892 W. M. Phillips 2–2
1893 W. M. Phillips 4–4
1894 None 3–3
1895 None 1–2
1896 None 1–1
1897 None 3–3
1898 None 3–3
1899 None 5–7
1900 W. H. Fox 10–5
1901 W. H. Fox 9–5
1902 Bill Priel 10–4–1
1903 J. C. Kelsey 3–8
1904 J. C. Kelsey 12–8
1905 Phil O'Neil 9–7
Independent: 86–68–1
Big Ten Conference (1906–present)
1906 Hugh Nicol 4–3 1–1 t–4th
1907 Hugh Nicol 6–6 3–3 5th
1908 Hugh Nicol 10–3 7–3 3rd
1909 Hugh Nicol 11–2 7–2 1st
1910 Hugh Nicol 9–3 5–3 2nd
1911 Hugh Nicol 9–3 6–3 3rd
1912 Hugh Nicol 5–5 4–5 4th
1913 Hugh Nicol 6–5–1 4–5–1 4th
1914 Hugh Nicol 7–6 5–6 4th
1915 B. P. Pattison 7–8 4–7 6th
1916 B. P. Pattison 12–7 8–4 5th
1917 Ward Lambert 5–7 3–5 6th
1918 John Pierce 6–7 1–5 t–6th
1919 Ward Lambert 3–9 0–7 8th
1920 Ward Lambert 6–10–1 2–9–1 6th
1921 Ward Lambert 10–11 4–7 6th
1922 Ward Lambert 12–10 7–5 4th
1923 Ward Lambert 9–8 6–5 5th
1924 Ward Lambert 9–7 5–5 6th
1925 Ward Lambert 5–11 1–9 10th
1926 Ward Lambert 11–4–2 7–4–1 t–3rd
1927 Ward Lambert 9–5–1 5–5 t–4th
1928 Ward Lambert 10–4 6–4 2nd
1929 Ward Lambert 10–8 4–6 t–6th
1930 Ward Lambert 7–9 3–7 t–7th
1931 Ward Lambert 3–7 0–5 10th
1932 Ward Lambert 8–5 6–4 t-3rd
1933 Ward Lambert 6–6–1 4–3 6th
1934 Ward Lambert 9–6–2 4–5–1 7th
1935 Ward Lambert 12–13 3–9 10th
1936 Dutch Fehring 6–21–1 1–10 t–8th
1937 Dutch Fehring 12–14 2–9 10th
1938 Dutch Fehring 14–10 6–5 t–3rd
1939 Dutch Fehring 12–8–3 5–5 t–6th
1940 Dutch Fehring 14–9 2–7 9th
1941 Dutch Fehring 15–10–1 4–8 9th
1942 Dutch Fehring 11–14 5–7 t–5th
1943 C. S. Doan 9–5 1–5 7th
1944 C. S. Doan 6–11–1 4–5 t–6th
1945 Ward Lambert 9–12 3–10 9th
1946 Ward Lambert 10–6 2–4 7th
1947 Mel Taube 13–10 5–8 8th
1948 Mel Taube 14–7–1 9–5 4th
1949 Mel Taube 14–9–2 7–5 4th
1950 Mel Taube 11–14 2–8 8th
1951 Hank Stram 10–12–1 2–6 10th
1952 Hank Stram 12–11 7–5 4th
1953 Hank Stram 5–13 2–9 t–8th
1954 Hank Stram 13–13 4–11 t–9th
1955 Hank Stram 13–9–1 5–8 8th
1956 Paul Hoffman 13–15 4–11 9th
1957 Paul Hoffman 9–5–1 3–3 6th
1958 Paul Hoffman 12–18 6–8 8th
1959 Paul Hoffman 18–11–1 5–8–1 8th
1960 Joe Sexson 12–8–1 4–4–1 6th
1961 Joe Sexson 8–17 3–11 10th
1962 Joe Sexson 14–14–1 4–11 9th
1963 Joe Sexson 16–14 5–10 9th
1964 Joe Sexson 15–10 8–7 t–4th
1965 Joe Sexson 14–11–2 5–7 t–7th
1966 Joe Sexson 9–14–3 2–9–1 9th
1967 Joe Sexson 14–18 7–9 7th
1968 Joe Sexson 4–21–1 0–12 10th
1969 Joe Sexson 9–20 7–11 t–8th
1970 Joe Sexson 16–18 8–10 t–6th
1971 Joe Sexson 17–20 6–12 7th
1972 Joe Sexson 11–18 3–9 9th
1973 Joe Sexson 8–26 2–16 10th
1974 Joe Sexson 14–18 4–10 10th
1975 Joe Sexson 7–24 1–15 10th
1976 Joe Sexson 19–20 5–9 8th
1977 Joe Sexson 14–27 2–16 10th
1978 Dave Alexander 16–26 3–13 10th
1979 Dave Alexander 19–30 6–12 7th
1980 Dave Alexander 27–24 7–9 5th
1981 Dave Alexander 30–30–1 8–6–1 2nd (East) Big Ten Tournament
1982 Dave Alexander 36–23 6–10 t–3rd (East)
1983 Dave Alexander 22–33–2 5–11 4th (East)
1984 Dave Alexander 29–26–2 6–10 5th (East)
1985 Dave Alexander 33–25 8–8 t–2nd (East)
1986 Dave Alexander 37–27 9–7 2nd (East) Big Ten Tournament
1987 Dave Alexander 36–24–1 10–6 2nd (East) NCAA Regional
1988 Dave Alexander 26–34 6–22 10th
1989 Dave Alexander 34–25 11–17 8th
1990 Dave Alexander 27–30–1 8–18–1 8th
1991 Dave Alexander 35–21 14–14 6th
1992 Steve Green 30–24 13–15 6th
1993 Steve Green 36–22 16–12 3rd Big Ten Tournament
1994 Steve Green 16–39 8–20 10th
1995 Steve Green 27–30 15–13 t–3rd Big Ten Tournament
1996 Steve Green 22–32–1 8–19 9th
1997 Steve Green 30–25 17–11 t–3rd Big Ten Tournament
1998 Steve Green/Bob Shepherd 23–29 9–18 10th
1999 Doug Schreiber 24–30 10–17 t–7th
2000 Doug Schreiber 35–23 17–11 t–3rd Big Ten Tournament
2001 Doug Schreiber 32–24 19–7 2nd Big Ten Tournament
2002 Doug Schreiber 24–32 13–19 9th
2003 Doug Schreiber 29–26 13–18 7th
2004 Doug Schreiber 29–28 17–14 5th Big Ten Tournament
2005 Doug Schreiber 27–30 17–11 2nd Big Ten Tournament
2006 Doug Schreiber 31–27 15–17 t–5th Big Ten Tournament
2007 Doug Schreiber 22–32 11–20 8th
2008 Doug Schreiber 32–26 21–10 2nd Big Ten Tournament
2009 Doug Schreiber 25–26 11–12 6th Big Ten Tournament
2010 Doug Schreiber 33–24 12–12 t–5th Big Ten Tournament
2011 Doug Schreiber 37–20 14–10 3rd Big Ten Tournament
2012 Doug Schreiber 45–14 17–7 1st NCAA Regional
2013 Doug Schreiber 17–34 6–18 10th
Big Ten Conference: 1765–1748–36 703–983–9
Total: 1852–1816–36

      National champion  
      Conference regular season champion         Conference regular season and conference tournament champion
      Division regular season champion       Division regular season and conference tournament champion
      Conference tournament champion

Notable former players[edit]

Below is a list of notable former Boilermakers and the seasons in which they played for Purdue.[1][3]

Clyde Goodwin, the program's first Major League Baseball player
Josh Lindblom, who played for the program from 2007–2008

2012 MLB Draft[edit]

In the 2012 Major League Baseball Draft, a program-record seven Purdue players were selected: C Kevin Plawecki by the New York Mets (1st round), 3B Cameron Perkins by the Philadelphia Phillies (6th round), P Nick Wittgren by the Miami Marlins (9th round), P Lance Breedlove by the Pittsburgh Pirates (23rd round), 2B Eric Charles by the San Diego Padres (29th round), OF Barrett Serrato by the Texas Rangers (30th round), and P Brad Schreiber by the Minnesota Twins (40th round).[15] P Blake Mascarello signed with the Phillies as an undrafted free agent. Mascarello, along with six of the seven draftees (all but Schreiber) signed professional contracts.[16]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j "2012 Purdue Baseball Record Book". PurdueSports.com. Purdue Sports Information. Archived from the original on 2012-07-20. Retrieved 20 July 2012. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f Lambert Field (Baseball) at purduesports.com, URL accessed October 24, 2009. Archived 10/24/09
  3. ^ a b "Purdue University Baseball Players Who Played in the Major Leagues". Baseball-Almanac.com. Archived from the original on 2012-07-20. Retrieved 20 July 2012. 
  4. ^ "2012 West Virginia Baseball Media Guide". West Virginia Sports Information. Archived from the original on 2012-07-11. Retrieved 11 July 2012. 
  5. ^ "2012 Big Ten Baseball Record Book". p. 107. Archived from the original on 2012-06-27. Retrieved 27 June 2012. 
  6. ^ "NCAA Men's College World Series Records". NCAA. 2009. pp. 207–208. Retrieved 22 April 2012. 
  7. ^ "Baseball Coach Hits Own Player, Resigns". The Southeast Missourian. The Associated Press. 20 March 1998. Retrieved 20 July 2012. 
  8. ^ a b Hamnik, Al (25 April 2012). "Schreiber Has Boilermakers Poised for NCAA Tourney Bid". NWITimes.com. The Northwest Indiana Times. Archived from the original on 2012-07-20. Retrieved 20 July 2012. 
  9. ^ Amante, Maria (31 May 2012). "Gary, Steel Yard Help Purdue Host NCAA Regional Baseball Tourney". The Post-Tribune. Archived from the original on 2012-07-20. Retrieved 20 July 2012. 
  10. ^ "2012 NCAA Regional Results". D1Baseball.com. Archived from the original on 2012-07-20. Retrieved 20 July 2012. 
  11. ^ "Season Recap: Boilers Win Two Big Ten Titles During Historic Campaign". PurdueSports.com. Purdue Sports Information. 12 June 2012. Archived from the original on 2012-07-20. Retrieved 20 July 2012. 
  12. ^ Prister, Tim (26 September 2006). "Foe Info: Purdue". Rivals.com. Archived from the original on 2012-07-20. Retrieved 20 July 2012. 
  13. ^ "Purdue Baseball: The Regional Problem". HammerAndRails.com. 18 April 2012. Archived from the original on 2012-07-20. Retrieved 20 July 2012. 
  14. ^ Judith Barra Austin, Tom Schott (30 September 2011). "New Purdue Baseball Field to Be Named for Former Coach's Parents". Purdue.edu. The Purdue Exponent. Archived from the original on 2012-07-20. Retrieved 20 July 2012. 
  15. ^ "2012 MLB Draft by School: 2-4". CollegeBaseballInsider.com. Archived from the original on 2012-07-20. Retrieved 20 July 2012. 
  16. ^ "New MiLB Boilers Receive Their First Assignments; Black Part of Division Winner". PurdueSports.com. 18 June 2012. Archived from the original on 2012-07-20. Retrieved 20 July 2012.