RAF Middleton St. George

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RAF Middleton St. George
Ensign of the Royal Air Force.svg
IATA: noneICAO: none
Summary
Airport type Military
Owner Air Ministry
Operator Royal Air Force
Royal Canadian Air Force
Location Middleton St. George
Coordinates 54°30′33″N 001°25′46″W / 54.50917°N 1.42944°W / 54.50917; -1.42944
Map
RAF Middleton St. George is located in County Durham
RAF Middleton St. George
RAF Middleton St. George
Location in County Durham
Runways
Direction Length Surface
ft m
00/00 0 0 Concrete
00/00 0 0 Concrete
00/00 0 0 Concrete
RAF. Middleton St. George August 1960

RAF Middleton St. George was a Royal Air Force (RAF) Bomber Command station during World War II. It was located in County Durham, five miles east of Darlington, England.

The airfield began its life as Royal Air Force Station Goosepool, and in 1941 became RAF Middleton St. George. The aerodrome opened as a Bomber Command station in 1941. In 1943 it was allocated to No. 6 Group, Royal Canadian Air Force. A sub-station was located at RAF Croft, Yorkshire. Squadrons based here include: 76 Squadron, which flew Halifaxes, 78 Squadron, which flew Whitleys, 419 Squadron RCAF, which flew Wellingtons, Halifaxes, and Lancasters, 420 Squadron RCAF, which flew Wellingtons, and 428 Squadron RCAF, which flew Wellingtons, Halifaxes, and Lancasters.

After the war, the aerodrome served various squadrons and units including No. 13 Operational Training Unit (OTU), No. 2 Air Navigation School, No. 4 Flight Training School, and squadrons that used Meteors, Hunters, Javelins and Lightnings.

The RAF left the station in 1964, but the aerodrome was reopened in 1966 as a civil airport. The airfield was named Teesside International Airport in the 1960s, and was renamed Durham Tees Valley Airport in 2004. In 1986 the entire RAF Middleton St George Married Quarter housing estate was sold to The Welbeck Estate Group.

Units and aircraft[edit]

Unit Dates Aircraft Variant Notes
No. 33 Squadron RAF 1958–1962 Gloster Javelin FAW.7 and FAW.9 from 1960 Twin-engined jet fighter/interceptor.[1]
No. 76 Squadron RAF 1941–1942 Handley Page Halifax Mks.I and II Four-engined piston heavy bomber.[2]
No. 78 Squadron RAF 1941 Armstrong Whitworth Whitley Mk.V Twin-engined medium bomber.[2]
1942 Handley Page Halifax Mk.II Four-engined piston heavy bomber.[2]
No. 92 Squadron RAF 1957
1958-1960
Hawker Hunter F.6 Single-engined jet fighter/fighter-bomber.[3]
No. 264 Squadron RAF 1957 Gloster Meteor NF.14 Twin-engined jet night-fighter.[4]
No. 419 Squadron RCAF 1942–1944 Handley Page Halifax Mk.II Four-engined piston heavy bomber.[5]
1944–1945 Avro Lancaster Mk.X Four-engined piston heavy bomber.[5]
No. 420 Squadron RCAF 1942–1943 Vickers Wellington Mks.III and later X before move to North Africa Twin-engined medium bomber.[5]
No. 428 Squadron RCAF 1943–1944 Handley Page Halifax Mks.V and II Four-engined piston heavy bomber.[5]
1944–1945 Avro Lancaster Mk.X Four-engined piston heavy bomber.[5]

References[edit]

Citations[edit]

  1. ^ Jefford 1988, p. 36.
  2. ^ a b c Jefford 1988, p. 48.
  3. ^ Jefford 1988, p. 52.
  4. ^ Jefford 1988, p. 80.
  5. ^ a b c d e Jefford 1988, p. 91.

Bibliography[edit]

  • Halley, James J. (1988). The Squadrons of the Royal Air Force & Commonwealth, 1918-1988. Tonbridge, Kent, UK: Air-Britain (Historians) Ltd. ISBN 0-85130-164-9. 
  • Jefford MBE, Wg Cdr C G (1988). RAF Squadrons. A comprehensive record of the movement and equipment of all RAF squadrons and their antecedents since 1912. Shrewsbury: Airlife. ISBN 1-85310-053-6. 
  • Moyes, Philip J.R. (1976). Bomber Squadrons of the RAF and their Aircraft. London: Macdonald and Jane's (Publishers) Ltd. ISBN 0-354-01027-1. 

External links[edit]