Robert Beach

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Bob Beach
Member of the West Virginia Senate
from the 13th[1] district
Incumbent
Assumed office
January 2011
Serving with Roman Prezioso
Preceded by Michael A. Oliverio, II
Member of the West Virginia House of Delegates
from the 44th district
In office
January 2001 – January 2011
Member of the West Virginia House of Delegates
from the 44th district
In office
May 1998 – December 1998
Preceded by Robert C. Beach
Personal details
Born (1959-07-21) July 21, 1959 (age 55)
Morgantown, West Virginia
Nationality American
Political party Democratic
Spouse(s) Rachel Plybon Beach
Children Jennifer, Melanie, Courtney, Sam, Bob
Residence Morgantown, West Virginia
Alma mater Fairmont State College
Religion Methodist

Robert D. "Bob" Beach (born July 21, 1959 in Morgantown, West Virginia) is an American politician and a Democratic member of the West Virginia State Senate representing District 13[2] since January 2011. Beach served consecutively in the West Virginia Legislature ,House of Delegates from January 2001 until January 2011, and non-consecutively from his May 1998 appointment to fill the vacancy caused by the passing of his father the late Delegate Robert C. Beach until December 3, 1998 in the West Virginia House of Delegates within the 44 Delegate District. Bob is married to Rachel Plybon Beach and together reside in Morgantown, WV with children Bob & Sam. Bob also has three older children(Jennifer, Melanie, Courtney) from a previous marriage to Karen J. Mercer in 1980.

Education[edit]

Beach attended Fairmont State College -Spruce School of Real Estate - Andrew Young School of Leadership Studies

Elections[edit]

  • 2000 Beach captured the Democratic Primary nomination to the West Virginia House of Delegates and was elected in November 7, 2000 General election with incumbents Delegates Fleischauer (D), Fletcher (R), and Marshall (D), and unseating Delegate Houston (D).
  • 2002 When Delegate Marshall ran for West Virginia State Senate and Delegate Fletcher left the Legislature leaving two district seats open, again Beach captured the 2002 Democratic Primary nomination West Virginia House of Delegates and was re-elected in the November 5, 2002 leading the General election ticket followed by incumbents Delegate Fleischauer (D), returning Delegate Houston, and Republican nominee Cindy Frich.
  • 2004 Beach captured the 2004 Democratic Primary nomination to the West Virginia House of Delegates and was re-elected in November 2, 2004 General election with re-elected incumbent Frich (R), and Houston (D), and reseated former Delegate Marshall (D), unseating Delegate Fleischauer.
  • 2006 When Delegate Houston left the Legislature and left a district seat open, Beach again captured the 2006 Democratic Primary nomination to the West Virginia of Delegates and was re-elected in November 7, 2006 General election alongside incumbent Marshall (D), returning Delegate Fleischauer, and Democratic nominee Alex Shook
  • 2008 Beach captured the May 13, 2008 Democratic Primary nomination to the West Virginia House of Delegates with 7,139 votes (18.8%),[3] finishing third November 4, 2008 General election with 16,168 votes (17.9%) behind incumbent Delegates Shook and Marshall, and ahead of Delegate Fleischauer.[4]
  • 2014 Beach captured the May Democratic Primary Nomination after being unopposed. November 4, 2014 Beach successfully defeated challenger and former WV State GOP Chairman Kris Warner in the General Election for the 13th WV Senate District Seat. The 13th District is made up of a portion of both Marion and Monongalia Counties.
  • Senator Beach has served in a variety of legislative positions; including Chairman of Agriculture and Transportation. Member of the Legislative Oversight Commission on Education Accountability and the WV Holocaust Education Commission.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Robert Beach". Charleston, West Virginia: West Virginia Legislature. Retrieved April 10, 2014. 
  2. ^ "Bob Beach's Biography". Project Vote Smart. Retrieved April 10, 2014. 
  3. ^ "Statewide Results Primary Election May 13, 2008 Official Results". Charleston, West Virginia: Secretary of State of West Virginia. Retrieved April 10, 2014. 
  4. ^ "Statewide Results General Election November 4, 2008 Official Results". Charleston, West Virginia: Secretary of State of West Virginia. Retrieved April 10, 2014. 
  5. ^ "Statewide Results Primary Election May 11, 2010 Official Results". Charleston, West Virginia: Secretary of State of West Virginia. Retrieved April 10, 2014. 
  6. ^ "Statewide Results General Election November 2, 2010 Official Results". Charleston, West Virginia: Secretary of State of West Virginia. Retrieved April 10, 2014. 

External links[edit]