Roman Catholic Diocese of Civitavecchia-Tarquinia

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Diocese of Civitavecchia-Tarquinia
Dioecesis Centumcellarum-Tarquiniensis
Cattedrale civitavecchia-1.jpg
Civitavecchia Cathedral
Location
Country Italy
Ecclesiastical province Immediately subject to the Holy See
Statistics
Area 876 km2 (338 sq mi)
Population
- Total
- Catholics
(as of 2006)
85,746
82,752 (96.5%)
Parishes 26
Information
Denomination Catholic Church
Rite Roman Rite
Established 20 December 1825
Cathedral Cattedrale di S. Francesco d’Assisi (Civitavecchia)
Co-cathedral Concattedrale di Ss. Margherita e Martino (Tarquinia)
Current leadership
Pope Francis
Bishop Luigi Marrucci
Emeritus Bishops Girolamo Grillo
Website
www.civitavecchia.chiesacattolica.it

The Italian Catholic Diocese of Civitavecchia-Tarquinia (Latin: Dioecesis Centumcellarum-Tarquiniensis) is in Lazio, and has existed under this name since 1986. The diocese is directly subject to the Holy See.[1]

History[edit]

Centumcellæ was the ancient name of Civitavecchia.[2] Catacombs have been found here.

In 314 Epictetus, its bishop, was present at the Council of Arles. Another Epictetus, Bishop of Centumcellæ towards the middle of the fourth century, was an Arian and a counsellor of Emperor Constantius.

In 1086 the see was suppressed and Civitavecchia was united to the diocese of Toscanella, and in 1193 to the diocese of Viterbo. In 1825 Pope Leo XII re-established the see, uniting it to Porto and Santa Rufina.

In 1854 the union with Santa Rufina was severed and Civitavecchia was united with the diocese of Corneto. No bishops of Corneto are known for the ancient Christian period; it was made a diocese in 1435.[3][4] Until 1986 the united diocese was known as Tarquinia e Civitaveccia .

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Catholic Hierarchy page, Civitavecchia-Tarquinia
  2. ^ Liber Pontificalis, ed. Louis Duchesne, I, 150-52.
  3. ^ Catholic Encyclopedia article
  4. ^ Catholic Hierarchy page, Civitavecchia-

 This article incorporates text from a publication now in the public domainHerbermann, Charles, ed. (1913). Catholic Encyclopedia. Robert Appleton Company.