San Francisco general election, November 2013

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The November 2013 San Francisco general elections were held on November 5, 2013, in San Francisco, California. The elections included one seat on the San Francisco Board of Supervisors, assessor-recorder, city attorney, and treasurer; and four ballot measures.

Board of Supervisors[edit]

District 4[edit]

San Francisco District 4 (2012).svg

District 4 consists primarily of the Sunset district. Incumbent supervisor Katy Tang ran in her first election after being appointed by Mayor Ed Lee in the wake of Carmen Chu's resignation to be San Francisco Assessor-Recorder.

District 4 supervisorial special election, 2013
Candidate Votes Percentage
Katy Tang (incumbent) 8,725 80.42%
Ivan Seredni 1,753 16.16%
Michael Murphy (write-in) 272 2.51%
Other write-in 99 0.91%
Total votes 10,849 100.00%
Voter turnout 31.76%

Assessor-Recorder[edit]

One-term incumbent Carmen Chu, who was initially appointed by Mayor Ed Lee in February 2013, ran for her initial election unopposed.

San Francisco Assessor-Recorder special election, 2013
Candidate Votes Percentage
Carmen Chu (incumbent) 95,849 98.05%
write-in 3,110 1.95%
Valid votes 98,959 76.75%
Invalid or blank votes 29,978 23.25%
Total votes 128,937 100.00%
Voter turnout 29.30%

City Attorney[edit]

Three-term incumbent Dennis Herrera ran for reelection unopposed.

San Francisco City Attorney election, 2013
Candidate Votes Percentage
Dennis Herrera (incumbent) 95,323 96.91%
write-in 3,044 3.09%
Valid votes 98,367 76.29%
Invalid or blank votes 30,570 23.71%
Total votes 128,937 100.00%
Voter turnout 29.30%

Treasurer[edit]

Two-term incumbent José Cisneros ran for reelection unopposed.

San Francisco Treasurer election, 2013
Candidate Votes Percentage
José Cisneros (incumbent) 91,421 96.97%
write-in 2,957 3.13%
Valid votes 94,378 73.20%
Invalid or blank votes 34,559 26.80%
Total votes 128,937 100.00%
Voter turnout 29.30%

Propositions[edit]

Propositions: ABCD
Note: "City" refers to the San Francisco municipal government.

Proposition A[edit]

Proposition A would require the Retiree Health Care Trust Fund to be fully funded or for certain budgetary criteria to be met before payments from the fund may be made.

Proposition A
Choice Votes  %
Referendum passed Yes 82,426 68.24%
No 38,367 31.76%
Valid votes 120,793 93.68%
Invalid or blank votes 8,144 6.32%
Total votes 128,937 100.00%

Proposition B[edit]

Proposition B would create a special district at 8 Washington Street, allowing for the development of residential units and commercial facilities with higher building height limits than currently zoned. Unlike Proposition C below, this measure is a ballot initiative filed by the project developer incorporating certain details of the entire project beyond building height limits.

Proposition B
Choice Votes  %
Referendum failed No 79,738 62.79%
Yes 47,257 37.21%
Valid votes 126,995 98.49%
Invalid or blank votes 1,942 1.51%
Total votes 128,937 100.00%

Proposition C[edit]

Proposition C would increase building height limits at 8 Washington Street. Unlike Proposition B above, this measure is a referendum on an ordinance passed by the San Francisco Board of Supervisors and only involves building height limits.

Proposition C
Choice Votes  %
Referendum failed No 84,083 66.96%
Yes 41,497 33.04%
Valid votes 125,580 97.40%
Invalid or blank votes 3,357 2.60%
Total votes 128,937 100.00%

Proposition D[edit]

Proposition D would make it City policy to utilize all available opportunities to lower the City's cost of prescription drugs and to ask state and federal representatives to sponsor legislation to reduce drug prices paid by the government.

Proposition D
Choice Votes  %
Referendum passed Yes 97,084 79.84%
No 24,690 20.16%
Valid votes 122,494 95.00%
Invalid or blank votes 6,443 5.00%
Total votes 128,937 100.00%

External links[edit]