Songs from the Black Hole

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Songs from the Black Hole
Studio album by Weezer
Released Not released
Recorded December 1994 - June 1996
Genre Alternative rock, power pop
Label Geffen Records
Producer Weezer

Songs from the Black Hole is an unfinished, unreleased album by the American alternative rock band Weezer, once intended to follow their 1994 self-titled debut album. It was to be a science fiction rock opera that expressed songwriter Rivers Cuomo's mixed feelings about success, feeling he was "lost in space". Its six characters were to be voiced by Cuomo, Brian Bell and Matt Sharp of Weezer, Rachel Haden of That Dog and the Rentals, Joan Wasser of the Dambuilders, and Weezer collaborator Karl Koch.

Cuomo recorded demos for Songs from the Black Hole over Christmas 1994, and Weezer worked on the album in recording sessions over the following year. At the end of 1995, Cuomo enrolled at Harvard University, where his songwriting became darker and more confessional. Feeling the Black Hole concept was "too whimsical", he abandoned it in favor of Pinkerton (1996), featuring mostly new songs written at Harvard. Two Songs from the Black Hole tracks were released as B-sides for singles from Pinkerton, and many of Cuomo's demos were eventually released on the compilation albums Alone - The Home Recordings of Rivers Cuomo (2007), Alone II: The Home Recordings of Rivers Cuomo (2008) and Alone III: The Pinkerton Years (2011).

In 2007, Rolling Stone named Songs from the Black Hole one of rock music's "mythical lost masterpieces".

Background[edit]

Weezer's self-titled debut album was released in 1994 and became a commercial and critical success. Songwriter Rivers Cuomo told Rolling Stone that success had "stirred up a lot of mixed feelings in me 'Yay, I'm happy' as well as 'I'm not sure this is the life I want to lead.'"[1] Touring with Weezer, Cuomo had listened to the operas Aida (1871) and Madama Butterfly (1904), the rock opera Jesus Christ Superstar (1970), and the musical Les Misérables (1980); he admired "how these works married music and drama, how the different characters would sing to each other instead of talk and how the story unfolded through song."[2] He decided that a musical drama could be "the larger scale composition I wanted to write for Weezer's second record: a new-wave influenced rock musical in which I could explore my feelings about relationships, stardom, and my life in Weezer."[2]

Concept[edit]

"I Just Threw Out the Love of My Dreams" is a synthesizer-led rock song with Rachel Haden on lead vocals and Cuomo on backing vocals.

Songs From the Black Hole was to be a science fiction rock opera with tracks that segued seamlessly, ending with a coda that revisited the album's major musical themes.[3]

In the year 2126, the spaceship Betsy II embarks on a galaxy-wide mission. Crew members Wuan (to be voiced by Weezer guitarist Brian Bell) and Dondó (bassist Matt Sharp) are in high spirits, but the ship's captain, Jonas (Cuomo), has mixed feelings. The ship's robot, M1 (Weezer collaborator Karl Koch), urges the crew to stay focused on their objective. Jonas becomes involved in a love triangle with the two female crew members, "good girl" Laurel (Rachel Haden of That Dog and the Rentals), and the ship's cook, "bad girl" Maria (Joan Wasser of the Dambuilders), with whom he fathers a child. When the ship finally reaches its destination, Jonas is disillusioned and longs to return to a simpler life.[4]

Cuomo said the story was a metaphor for "taking off, going out on the road and up the charts with a rock band, which is what was happening to me at the time I was writing this and feeling like I was lost in space."[5] The ship's name Betsy II is taken from Weezer's first tour bus, nicknamed Betsy; M1 represents Weezer's management and record label; Wuan and Dondó represent the part of Cuomo that was excited about rock and roll success; Jonas represents his doubts and longing; Laurel and Maria represent his relationships with women.[2]

Recording and abandonment[edit]

Cuomo recorded demos for Songs from the Black Hole on an 8-track at his family home in Connecticut over Christmas 1994. Most of the songs were written before Songs for the Black Hole was conceived and "reshaped" to fit the new concept.[6] Cuomo performed every part himself, pitch-shifting his voice for the female characters.[7] In January 1995, he purchased Electro-Harmonix and Korg synthesizers, wanting to add a "sci-fi" element to Weezer's guitar rock sound.[2] By February, he had completed an initial track list.[7] While Weezer was on tour in Europe later that month, bassist Matt Sharp returned to America due to a family emergency, leaving the band stranded in Hamburg for a week. Cuomo and drummer Pat Wilson rented a recording studio and recorded additional demos, including a version of "Blast Off!" using a vocoder for the robot character of M1.[7]

Weezer recorded Songs from the Black Hole tracks at the Electric Lady Studios in New York City, but were not satisfied with the results.

In March 1995, Cuomo had extensive surgery to lengthen his leg, followed by months of painful physiotherapy sessions. This affected his songwriting, as he would spend long periods hospitalized under the influence of painkillers.[8] According to Cuomo, around this time the rock opera concept "started to feel too whimsical for where I was emotionally, going through the pain of the procedure ... I went to a more serious and dark place."[1]

Recording sessions for Weezer's second album began in August 1995 in New York City's Electric Lady Studios, where their debut album was recorded, but were not productive.[7] Further sessions were held in September and October, and Weezer recorded versions of "Blast Off!", "Longtime Sunshine", "I Just Threw Out the Love of My Dreams", "Tired of Sex" and "Getchoo". Weezer had not yet abandoned Songs from the Black Hole, but the songs were recorded with "no story, no theatrics, no characters."[9]

At the end of 1995, wanting to "escape the limelight", Cuomo enrolled at Harvard University to study classical composition.[9] Becoming socially isolated, and still recovering from surgery, Cuomo's songwriting became "darker, more visceral and exposed, less playful".[10] In January 1996, Weezer restarted recording in Los Angeles at Sound City Studios with new material. The Songs from the Black Hole tracks "Superfriend", "She's Had a Girl" and "Dude, We're Finally Landing" were recorded, but shelved.[10]

By May 1996, Cuomo had settled on a new direction for Weezer's second album, expressing his loneliness and frustration at Harvard, and Songs from the Black Hole was abandoned.[7] The decision was influenced by that year's release of Return of the Rentals, the debut album by Sharp's band the Rentals, as Cuomo felt it shared many musical and lyrical themes.[1]

Weezer's second album, Pinkerton, was released on September 24, 1996. It includes "Tired of Sex", "Getchoo" and "No Other One" – songs written before Songs from the Black Hole was conceived, altered to fit the concept, and finally altered again for inclusion on Pinkerton.[6] In June 1996, after Pinkerton's completion, Weezer recorded the Songs from the Black Hole tracks "I Just Threw Out the Love of My Dreams" (with Rachel Haden on vocals) and "Devotion" as B-sides for the singles "El Scorcho" and "The Good Life" respectively.[10]

Demo releases[edit]

In 1998, Cuomo discussed releasing a compilation album of his demos with Weezer's record label Geffen Records, including Songs from the Black Hole tracks, but the label feared it would "dilute" the Weezer brand.[6] On December 18, 2007, after further negotiation with Geffen, Cuomo released Alone - The Home Recordings of Rivers Cuomo, a collection of his demos recorded from 1992 to 2007.[11] The album includes five Songs From the Black Hole demos: "Longtime Sunshine", "Blast Off!", "Who You Callin' Bitch?", "Dude, We're Finally Landing", and "Superfriend". Cuomo considered releasing the unfinished Songs from the Black Hole in its entirety, but felt "it wouldn't really stand up, like it wouldn't be a very good listen."[12]

On November 25, 2008, Cuomo released a second album of demos, Alone II: The Home Recordings of Rivers Cuomo, including "Oh Jonas", "Please Remember" and "Come to My Pod".[13] On November 2, 2010, Geffen released a "Deluxe" edition of Pinkerton, including a version of "Longtime Sunshine" recorded at Electric Lady Studios in August 1995 and Cuomo's demo of "You Won't Get With Me Tonight".[14]

On December 12, 2011, Cuomo released a third album of demos, Alone III: The Pinkerton Years, including a "Suite from the Black Hole" comprising "Oh No, This Is Not For Me", "Tired of Sex", "She's Had a Girl", "What is This I Find?", "Now I Finally See" and "Longtime Sunshine". The album was sold exclusively with a book, The Pinkerton Diaries, which collects Cuomo's writings from the era, including Songs from the Black Hole lyrics and sheet music.[15]

Legacy[edit]

In 2007, Rolling Stone named Songs from the Black Hole one of rock music's "mythical lost masterpieces." In 2012, Complex included the album on its list of "50 Unreleased Albums We'd Kill to Hear", writing that "most of Weezer's best material was recorded during the Blue Album to Pinkerton era. Naturally, we'd love to see more Weezer records from the period."[16] In June 2014, the NME included the album on its list of "25 Unreleased Albums We'd Really Love To Hear", but conceded that Pinkerton was "not exactly the worst second prize."[17]

Reviewing Alone, Pitchfork felt that "Blast Off!" was the album's "crown jewel", writing that "it is such a fleeting rush of distortion-driven joy that the edges of the supposed dialogue are entirely blurred, and are hardly essential to enjoy it ... [it is] at least on par with Pinkerton's stellar B-sides (many of which would have made up Songs from the Black Hole)."[18] Reviewing Alone II, Pitchfork found that its Songs from the Black Hole demos were "all goofy, off-the-cuff, and charming."[19]

Cover versions[edit]

The American band Tera Melos included a cover of "Blast Off!" on their EP IDIOMS vol. I (2009). In 2013, the Weezer tribute act Operation Space Opera released an album recreating Songs from the Black Hole in its entirety based on Cuomo's demos and writing.[20]

Track lists[edit]

Cuomo compiled track list 1 in February 1995 and track list 2 in late 1995.[7]

Track list 1[edit]

No. Title Length
1. "Blast Off!!"    
2. "You Won't Get With Me Tonight"    
3. "Maria's Theme"    
4. "Come to My Pod"    
5. "This is Not For Me"    
6. "Tired of Sex"    
7. "Superfriend"    
8. "She's Had a Girl"    
9. "Good News!"    
10. "Now I Finally See"    
11. "Getchoo"    
12. "I Just Threw Out the Love of My Dreams"    
13. "No Other One"    
14. "Devotion"    
15. "What is This I Find?"    
16. "Longtime Sunshine"    
17. "Longtime Sunshine (Reprise)"    

Track list 2[edit]

No. Title Length
1. "Blast Off!!"    
2. "Who You Callin' Bitch?"    
3. "Oh Jonas"    
4. "Please Remember"    
5. "Come to My Pod"    
6. "Oh No, This is Not For Me"    
7. "Tired of Sex"    
8. "She's Had a Girl"    
9. "Dude, We're Finally Landing"    
10. "Now I Finally See"    
11. "I Just Threw Out the Love of My Dreams"    
12. "Superfriend"    
13. "Superfriend (Reprise)"    
14. "You Won't Get With Me Tonight"    
15. "What is This I Find?"    

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Greene, Andy (2 November 2010). "Rivers Cuomo Looks Back at 'Pinkerton'". Rolling Stone. Retrieved 9 July 2014. 
  2. ^ a b c d Alone II: The Home Recordings of Rivers Cuomo liner notes
  3. ^ Luerssen 2004, p. 137.
  4. ^ Alone: The Home Recordings of Rivers Cuomo booklet and liner notes
  5. ^ Rolling Stone. November 2007. 
  6. ^ a b c Heisel, Scott. "Web Exclusive: A conversation with Rivers Cuomo". Alternative Press. Retrieved 2007-11-01. 
  7. ^ a b c d e f "Weezer Recording History page 7". weezer.com. Retrieved 11 July 2014. 
  8. ^ Luerssen 2004, pp. 148–149.
  9. ^ a b "Weezer Recording History page 8". Weezer.com. Retrieved 11 July 2014. 
  10. ^ a b c Pinkerton Deluxe liner notes
  11. ^ Kharas, Kev. "Weezer's Rivers Cuomo to release solo album". Drowned in Sound. Archived from the original on 17 October 2007. Retrieved 2007-10-16. 
  12. ^ "Rivers is in Japan". January 24, 2008. Retrieved July 11, 2014. 
  13. ^ Thompson, Paul (October 28, 2007). "Rivers Cuomo Talks Alone II, Weezer, That Hair". Pitchfork Media. Retrieved July 13, 2014. 
  14. ^ Breihan, Tom (September 27, 2010). "Weezer Reveal Pinkerton Reissue Details". Pitchfork Media. Retrieved July 13, 2014. 
  15. ^ Pelly, Jenn (November 11, 2011). "Rivers Cuomo Releasing Pinkerton Diaries Book and Demos Comp Alone III". Pitchfork Media. Retrieved July 13, 2014. 
  16. ^ "50 Unreleased Albums We'd Kill to Hear". Complex. August 8, 2014. 
  17. ^ "25 Unreleased Albums We'd Really Love To Hear". NME. Retrieved 7 July 2014. 
  18. ^ Crock, Jason (13 December 2007). "Alone: The Home Recordings of Rivers Cuomo". Pitchfork. Retrieved 9 July 2014. 
  19. ^ Crock, Jason (8 December 2014). "Alone II: The Home Recordings of Rivers Cuomo". Pitchfork. Retrieved 9 July 2014. 
  20. ^ Munro, Tyler (September 7, 2012). "Ambitious fans remake Weezer's lost rock opera, "Songs From The Black Hole"". Aux. Retrieved July 11, 2014. 
Sources

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