Starship Traveller

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Starship Traveller
Ff22puffin.jpg
Original cover
Author Steve Jackson
Illustrator Peter Andrew Jones
Cover artist Peter Andrew Jones
Series Fighting Fantasy (number 4)
Genre Science fiction
Publisher Puffin Books
Publication date
1983 (1983)
ISBN ISBN 0-14-031637-X
Starship Traveller
Ff22wizard.jpg
Wizard Books' edition
Author Steve Jackson
Illustrator Peter Andrew Jones
Cover artist Chris Moore
Series Fighting Fantasy (number 22)
Genre Science fiction
Publisher Wizzard Books
Publication date
2002 (2002)
ISBN ISBN 1-84046-552-2

Starship Traveller is a single-player adventure gamebook written by Steve Jackson and illustrated by Peter Andrew Jones. Originally published by Puffin Books in 1983, the title is the fourth gamebook in the Fighting Fantasy series. It was later republished by Wizard Books in 2002.

Rules[edit]

Main article: Fighting Fantasy

This adventure was the first Fighting Fantasy title with a science fiction setting. It was the first title to introduce rules for gun-combat and spaceship combat. The player must also manage the statistics of multiple characters (Captain and crew) and the vessel itself. It is also possible to finish the adventure without having engaged in combat at all.

Story[edit]

Sucked through the nightmare of the Seltsian Void, the starship Traveller emerges at the other side of the black hole into an unknown universe.

YOU are the captain of the Traveller and her fate depends on YOU! Will you be able to discover the way back to Earth from the alien peoples and planets you encounter, or will the starship be doomed to roam uncharted space forever?

The player takes the role of a starship commander whose ship and crew are sucked through a black hole into an alternate universe. The player's goal is to return to collects clues from several different planets that will allow the plotting of a course to return home.

Reception[edit]

Marcus L. Rowland reviewed Starship Traveller for the January 1984 issue of White Dwarf, rating the title a 9 out of a possible 10. Rowland noted that this book was "apparently inspired by Star Trek," and that possible events in the game include "capture for gladitorial games, plague, summary execution as an illegal alien, and mutiny".[1]

See also[edit]

External links[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Rowland, Marcus (January 1984). "Open Box". White Dwarf (Games Workshop) (49): 14–15.