Stihl Timbersports Series

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The Stihl Timbersports Series is a series of woodsman or wood chopping competitions where the athletes compete in the use of axes and saws in manners typical for lumberjacks. It was founded in 1985, and currently include six different disciplines, with both professional and collegiate divisions. The terms 'timbersports' and 'timber sports' are trademarked by Stihl Inc.

History[edit]

STIHL TIMBERSPORTS Logo.jpg

Stihl Timbersports was incepted in 1985, and the earliest broadcasts were made from a field in Wisconsin, USA, using a single camera on a forklift. At this time, there was no overall Series championship. Instead, awards were given for performances in individual events on venues around the country. Stihl, however, had a vision of a series that would bring the best athletes together and let them compete in several events and thus determine who was the best overall lumberjack.

With the help of Granite State Lumberjack Shows, the Series evolved and has become a very prestigious competition. Athletes from all around the world take part in the Series with European athletes taking part in the Series since 2005.

The Series has also spawned a college series, the Stihl Timbersports Collegiate Series, involving over 60 collegiate woodsman teams in the US and Canada. The winner of this series automatically receives a seed for next year's professional series.

The Series is currently featured on ESPN and attracts millions of viewers worldwide. It is recognized as the longest running show on ESPN other than SportsCenter.[1] Tommy Sanders has served as on-air host of The Series since 1992.

Events[edit]

The Series currently involves six disciplines.[2][3][4]

  • Springboard - The competitor uses two spring boards to ascend to the top of a nine foot pole and chop a firmly attached 12" diameter block from the top of the pole. The block must be chopped from both sides.
  • STIHL Stock Saw - Competitors begin with both hands on the log. When the signal is given, the sawyers, using identical STIHL professional MS660 chain saws, make two cuts through identical logs. No more than 4" of wood, which is marked by a black line, can be cut.
  • Underhand Chop - The competitor stands, feet apart, on a 12"-14" log. At the signal, he begins chopping through the log. Before chopping all the way through he must turn and complete the cut from the other side. Time ends when the log is severed completely.
  • Single Buck - Competitors make one cut through 18"-20" of white pine using a single man cross cut saw. The competitor may have a helper to wedge the log and keep the saw lubricated. Time ends when the block is clearly severed.
  • Standing Block Chop - Competitors race to chop through 12"-14" of white pine. The competitor must chop from both sides of the log and the time ends when the block is severed.
  • Hot Saw - In this event the competitor uses a customized chain saw with a modified engine. At the signal, the competitor starts the saw and makes three cuts. The competitor must cut no more than 6" from the log which is marked with a black line.

World Records for white pine[edit]

  • Springboard - 32.77 seconds, set by David Bolstad in 2000, with a wood diameter of 11".[5]
  • Stock Saw - 9.445 seconds, set by Martin Komarek in 2010, with a wood diameter of 16".[5]
  • Standing Block Chop - 12.11 seconds, set by Jason Wynyard in 2003, with a wood diameter of 12".[5]
  • Underhand Chop - 12.28 seconds, set by David K. Bolstad in 1999, with a wood diameter of 13".[5]
  • Single Buck - 9.395 seconds, set by Jason Wynyard in 2007, with a wood diameter of 19".[5]
  • Hot Saw - 5.085 second, set by Matt Bush in 2003, with a wood diameter of 19".[5]

Series Champions[edit]

1985 - United States Mike Sullivan
1986 - United States Mel Lentz
1987 - United States Rolin Eslinger
1988 - United States Mel Lentz
1989 - United States Rolin Eslinger
1990 - United States Mel Lentz
1991 - United States Mel Lentz
1992 - United States Mel Lentz
1993 - United States Rolin Eslinger
1994 - United States Matt Bush
1995 - United States Mel Lentz
1996 - United States Harry Burnsworth
1997 - New Zealand Jason Wynyard
1998 - New Zealand Jason Wynyard
1999 - New Zealand Jason Wynyard
2000 - New Zealand Jason Wynyard
2001 - New Zealand David Bolstad
2002 - New Zealand Jason Wynyard
2003 - New Zealand David Bolstad
2004 - New Zealand David Bolstad
2005 - United States Matt Bush
2006 - New Zealand Jason Wynyard
2007 - New Zealand David Bolstad
2008 - New Zealand David Bolstad
2009 - New Zealand Jason Wynyard
2010 - New Zealand Jason Wynyard
2011 - New Zealand Jason Wynyard
2012 - New Zealand Jason Wynyard
2013 - Australia Brad De Losa
2014 - New Zealand Jason Wynyard

World Relay Champions[edit]

2010 - New Zealand New Zealand
2011 - Australia Australia
2012 - New Zealand New Zealand
2013 - New Zealand New Zealand
2014 - Australia Australia

European Champion[edit]

2002 - Switzerland Thomas Gerber
2003 - Czech Republic Martin Komarek
2004 - Czech Republic Martin Komarek
2005 - Czech Republic Martin Komarek
2006 - Czech Republic Martin Komarek
2007 - Germany Dirk Braun
2008 - Germany Dirk Braun

European Champion Crew[edit]

2004 -  United Kingdom
2005 -  France
2006 -   Switzerland
2007 -   Switzerland
2008 -  Czech Republic

See also[edit]

References[edit]

External links[edit]